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BETTER  BEFRESU3^XT  IBERCHAXDiSiXG: 

Sweeter  C mdy  Profits  with  “Dime”  Bars  and  Vending  Machine 

the  Post  Office,  at  New  York  City.  U.  S.  W..  under  the  art  of  March  .1.  1879,  Pn 
ff  S xth  Avenue.  Rockefeller  Center,  Sciu  York  10,  A'.  Y.  Subscription  frrices:  $5.( 
If  copy,  25  cents.  All  contents  copyriiihted  1956  by  Cniiilcy  Publishing  Coinfany.  In 


JANUARY  7,%I956 


Q If;  throughli^l  his  days,  a man  in  business  tells  the  truth  as  he  sees 


d as  he  gives  it,  works  for  his  industry  for  its  own 
his,  he  gets  what  is  known  as  a good  reputation. 


it,  keeps  his  wg 
sake  cdong  wiA 


It  is  like  that,  too,  with  journals  of  business.  Publications  that 


A 


matter  have  the  attributes  of  personality. 


Q Motion  PiCTfce  Herald  is  happy  in  the  consciousness  of,  and  re 
sponsibility  tojpi  good  name.  , . 


for  JANUARY 


New  Theatre  Desiofi  for  and  in  Wide-Screen  Technique 
A Way  to  Bring  Simplification  into  the  New  Projection 
Adding  Glamorscop&  to  the  New  Processes  of  Exhibition 


FOREVER  DARLING 


SYNCHRONIZE  YOUR  PLAYDATE  TOj 


Lucille  Ball 


Desi  Arnaz 


James  Mason 


HOW  TO  MAKE  MONEY! 

FIRST  BIG  COMEDY 
OF  THE  NEW  YEAR ! 

Act  fast!  The  release  date  of  “FOREVER  DARLING”  is 
February  10th  and  the  most  complete  campaign  ever  devised, 
with  brand  new  ticket-selling  ideas,  is  synchronized  with  its 
national  saturation  distribution.  M-G-M’s  previous  Lucille 
Ball-Desi  Arnaz  success  “The  Long,  Long  Trailer”  had  terrific 
exploitation  tie-ups  that  ballyhooed  it  into  a box-office  money- 
maker, but  you  haven’t  seen  anything  like  this.  The  Quaker 
Cereal  tie-up  alone  with  its  “free  movie  ticket  for  junior  with 
paying  adult”  will  boom  box  offices  everywhere.  Study  the 
details  that  follow,  get  the  press  book  with  even  more  am- 
munition and  get  your  share  of  the  gravy!  Preliminary  pro- 
motion starts  below. 

LUCY-DESI  "IN  PERSON"  TOUR 

They  can’t  go  everywhere  but  they’ve  picked  key  places 
where  the  penetration  will  spread  the  widest.  Here’s  just  their 
beginning.  Starting  Sunday,  Jan.  29th,  a 1-day  appearance 
in  Chicago,  Cleveland,  Detroit,  Pittsburgh,  Philadelphia  and 
2 days  in  Jamestown,  N.Y. 

JAMESTOWN  WORLD  PREMIERE 

Full  scale  World  Premiere  in  Jamestown,  N.Y.,  birthplace 
of  Lucille  Ball,  on  Feb.  7th.  Rousing  “Welcome  Home!”  with 
radio,  newsreels,  TV  and  wire  services  blanketing  the  nation. 
Backed  by  City  Fathers,  with  entire  town  participating. 

PRESS  PARTY  ON  U.S.S.  CONSTITUTION 

On  Feb.  9th  aboard  the  U.S.S.  Constitution  in  New  York 
harbor,  a special  press  party  to  honor  Lucy-Desi  in  person, 
with  150  people  prominent  in  newspaper,  TV,  radio,  civic, 
fashion  and  society  worlds. 

BROADWAY  PREMIERE 

Following  that,  and  on  the  same  night,  Lucy-Desi  will  attend 
a gala  Broadway  premiere  of  their  big  new  comedy  attraction. 


SOMETHING  NEW 


FREE  MOVIE  TICKETS  INSIDE 


QUAKER  CEREAL  PACKAGES 


M-G-M’s  sensational  and  unprecedented  national  tie-up 
on  “Forever  Darling”  (“Forbidden  Planet”,  too!)  puts 
money  right  into  your  till.  Every  package  of  Quaker  Oats 
or  Mother’s  Oats,  Quaker  Puffed  Wheat  or  Quaker 
Puffed  Rice,  Muffets  Shredded  Wheat  and  Quaker  Pack- 
0-Ten  will  carry  a free  movie  ticket  for  youngsters  under 
12  years  old,  provided  he  or  she  is  accompanied  by  a 
paying  adult.  This  “Free  Movie”  offer  is  the  best  shot- 
in-the-arm  for  business  in  years.  Quaker  Oats  in  a 
tremendous  national  advertising  campaign  will  use 
newspaper  and  magazine  ads  and  many  kinds  of  display 
accessories  for  supermarkets  and  grocers.  Its  staff  of  75 
merchandising  men  and  485  salesmen  will  cooperate 
with  M-G-M  and  theatre  play  dates.  Following  is  the 
stupendous  newspaper,  magazine,  TV  and  radio  penetra- 
tion which  covers  the  nation : 


1.  FULL  PAGE  LOOK  AD  (on  sale  February  7)  Reader- 
ship  19,500,000. 


2.  SUNDAY  COMICS— In  124  Sunday  newspapers  across 
the  nation  on  Feb.  12th,  a 4- color  ad  with  100  million 
readership. 


3.  SUNDAY  SUPPLEMENTS- Family  Weekly,  Feb.  19 
issue,  in  101  newspapers  with  7,500,000  readership. 


TV’s  “SGT.  PRESTON  OF  THE  YUKON” -On 
CBS-TV  at  7:30  to  8:00  P.  M.  EST  every  Thursday 
over  72  stations  starting  Feb.  2 and  for  10  weeks  a 
plug  for  the  movie  offer  reaches  15  million  viewers. 


RADIO’S  “HERE’S  HOLLYWOOD”  — On  500 
Mutual  radio  stations  from  12:05  to  12:10  P.M.  daily 
EST,  Mon.  through  Fri.  from  Feb.  1st  through  April 
2,  an  estimated  962,000  listeners  in  740,000  homes. 


EXTRA!  SUNDAY  COMICS— In  88  newspapers  na- 
tionwide March  18  a second  4-color  ad  with  85  million 
readership.  


Imagine:  $400,000  Extra  Plan 

Additionally,  Quaker  Oats  has  made  an  allocation  of 
$400,000  as  a display  allowance  in  a special  plan  to 
obtain  the  strongest  possible  dealer  assistance.  Dealer 
materials  to  span  America;  7,500  grocery  store  Spectacu- 
lars, in  the  form  of  a theatre  box-office.  50,000  commercial 
Stack  Cards  featuring  the  movie  offer.  Flash  Sheets  for 
salesmen.  7,500  Spectacular  Robots.  50,000  Stack  Cards. 


i 


'S 

Ui 


lEB.  lO"*!  ACT  FAST! 

JVI-G-M's  “NEW  IDEA”  MASS  CAMPAIGN! 


5,000  DEPARTMENT  STORES  IN 
BIG  NATIONAL  TIE-UPS 

: AMAZING  TIE-UP!  Join  the  hundreds  of 
j theatres  whose  play-dates  synchronize  with 
|j  M-G-M’s  terrific  St.  Valentine’s  Day  promotion. 

(''Forever  Darling”  is  the  perfect  title  for  it!) 

'i  5,000  department  stores  pai'ticipate.  A special 
''  kit  is  av^able  to  them  which  incorporates  yom’ 
theatre  tie-in.  Imagine  the  benefit  yom’  box-office 
will  get  from  the  following: 

NIGHT  DRESS- MUNSINGWEAR.  “Forever  Darling” 
nightdress  and  peignoir.  Inspired  by  Lucille  Ball’s  wardrobe. 
Featured  in  full  color  in  February  Harper’s  Bazaar.  Ideal  for 
Valentine’s  Day  and  subsequent  promotions. 

CANDY- ROSEMARIE  DE  PARIS,  INC.  “Forever  Darling” 
candy.  Special  assortment  for  your  Valentine’s  Day  tie-up, 
also  for  other  play-dates.  Contact:  Rosemarie  de  Paris,  Inc., 
16  New  Street,  East  Boston  28,  Massachusetts. 

COATS- BENDER  & HAMBURGER  CO.  “Forever  Darling” 
Travel  Costume  and  Evening  Coat.  Interpreted  from  Lucille 
Ball’s  costumes.  Contact;  Bender  & Hamburger  Co.,  498 
Seventh  Ave.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

BRIDE’S  MAGAZINE-BRIDE’S  MAGAZINE.  Offering  free 
promotional  material,  cards  and  ad  reproductions  on  “Forever 
Darling”  to  stores  who  write  directly.  Contact:  Wells  Dror- 
baugh,  Jr.,  Bride’s  Magazine,  527  Fifth  Ave.,  New  York  17. 

PA  JAMAS- HARWOOD  MFG.  CORP.  “Forever  Darling” 
pajamas  for  him  and  her.  Free  window  display  cards  and  news- 
paper mats.  Contact:  Harwood  Mfg.  Corp.,  261  Fifth  Ave., 

; New  York.  N.  Y. 

. DRESSES-  WESTOVER  FASHIONS,  INC.  “Forever  Darling” 
dress.  Contact:  Westover  Fashions,  Inc.,  1400  Broadway,  New 
York  18,  N.  Y. 

'RCA  VICTOR  RECORDS— RCA  VICTOR  recording  by  the 
I Ames  Brothers  with  Hugo  Winterhalter  & Orchestra  of  the 
; Bong  “Forever  Darling”  plugged  in  the  picture.  45  or  78  rpm. 

I llecord  No.  RCA  20/47-6400. 

DRAPERIES- WAVERLY  BONDED  FABRICS.  2 “Forever 
, Darling”  patterns  in  Glosheen  fabrics  for  draperies.  Contact: 

; Waverly  Bonded  Fabrics,  60  West  40th  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

; BEDSPREADS-  MARCUS  BEDSPREAD  & DRAPERY  CORP. 
i “Forever  Darling”  bedspread  sets.  Contact:  Marcus  Bed- 
, spread  & Drapery  Corp.,  261  Fifth  Ave.,  New  York  16,  N.  Y. 

DOLLS- ALEXANDER  DOLLS.  “Forever  Darling”  bridal 
doU,  21"  tall  miniature  of  LuciUe  BaU  dressed  in  wedding 
gown,  jewelry  and  bridal  veil.  Contact:  Alexander  Doll  Co., 

, Inc.,  153  East  24th  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

I 

ASH  TRAY— WESTCORT  CO.  Ceramic  Ash  Tray.  “Forever 
I Darling”  new-idea  ash  receiver.  Contact:  Westcort  Co.,  4 East 
j|  52nd  St.,  New  York  22,  N.  Y. 

ARM  CHAIR- JAMESTOWN  ROYAL  UPHOLSTERY  CORP. 
Specially  designed  “Forever  Darling”  arm  chair.  Contact: 
Jamestown  Royal  Upholstery  Corp.,  Jamestown,  N.  Y. 


JEWELRY—  LEO  GLASS  & CO.,  INC.  Fashion  Jewelry. 
“Forever  Darling”  necklace  & earring  sets.  Contact:  Leo  Glass 
& Co.,  Inc.,  37  East  18th  St.,  New  York  3,  N.  Y. 

DELL  COMIC  BOOK- DELL  PUBLISHING  CO.  “Forever 
Darhng”  lOq  comic  book,  on  sale  January  12,  1956.  100  DeU 
sales  promotion  men,  coast-to-coast  wiU  help  with  tie-in 
displays  and  other  promotions.  Contact;  DeU  Publishing  Co., 
261  Fifth  Ave.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

WEDDING  GOWN- MURRAY  HAMBURGER  & CO.,  INC. 
“Forever  Darling”  wedding  gown  adapted  from  the  fabulous 
$4,000  gown  worn  by  LuciUe  BaU.  Also  matching  cap;  brides- 
maids’ gowns.  Advertised  in  January  Bride’s  Magazine.  Con- 
tact: Murray  Hamburger  & Co.,  Inc.,  498  Seventh  Ave.,  New 
York,  N.  Y. 

M-G-M  RECORDS-M-G-M  RECORDS  has  recorded  Desi 
Arnaz’s  rendition  of  the  title  song  “Forever  Darhng.”  Vocal 
by  Desi  and  The  Pied  Pipers.  Available  through  local 
M-G-M  Records  distributors.  No.  M-G-M  12144 — 78  rpm. 
No.  K 12144—45  rpm. 

Other  Tie-Ups: 

' DODGE  DEALER- DODGE  CARS.  New  1956  model  seen 
in  the  picture  to  be  featured  in  street  baUyhoo,  salesroom 
windows,  other  extensive  promotions. 

SHEET  MUSIC -LEO  FEIST,  INC.  “Forever  Darling” 
sheet  music  with  movie-credit  cover.  Contact:  Leo  Feist,  Inc., 
799  Seventh  Ave.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

NATIONAL  M-G-M  AD  SATURATION 

In  addition  to  the  countless  mUlions  reached  by  the  many 
tie-ups,  M-G-M  wiU  blast  the  national  and  fan  magazines 
with  ticket-seUing  ads,  plus  a teaser  and  display  newspaper 
campaign  geared  to  the  Feb.  10th  national  release  date. 
“Picture  of  the  Month”  column  alone  wiU  have  a readership  of 
close  to  50  miUion,  in  Good  Housekeeping,  True  Story, 
McCaU’s,  Woman’s  Home  Companion,  Parents’,  Redbook 
and  Seventeen.  TV  Gmde’s  9 miUion  readers  wiU  be  reached 
through  the  38  regional  editions  keyed  to  national  release 
and  actual  play-dates. 


M-G-M  WEEK-FEB.  5-11 

"An  M-G-M  'Picture  on  Every  Screen  of  the  World" 


LUCILLE  DESI  JAMES 
BALL*  ARNAZ  • MASON 

in 

"FOREVER  DARLING” 

Co-Starring  LOUIS  CALHERN 

JOHN  EMERY  • JOHN  HOYT  • NATALIE  SCHAFER 

Screen  Story  and  Screen  Ploy  by  HELEN  DEUTSCH 
Photographed  in  EASTMAN  COLOR  • Print  by  TECHNICOLOR 
Directed  by  Produced  by  Astoctofe  Producer 

ALEXANDER  HALL  • DESI  ARNAZ  • JERRY  THORPE 

A Zanra  Productions,  Inc.  Picture 
Filmed  in  Hollywood  by  Desilu 

(Available  in  Perspecla  Stereophonic  or  1-Channel  Sound) 


SOON  THE  WHOLE  WIDE  WORL 


The  fabulous  filming 
OF  THE  Age  of  Titans, 
FROM  THE  ‘ILIAD’  OF  HOMER 


Three  YearS-and 
Six  Million  dollars 

TO  PRODUCE! 

All  the  Tumultuous 
Wonders  and 
Tremendous  Drama 

IN  THE  STORY 
OF  HISTORY’S 
MOST  Famous 
Runaway  Lzovers! 


The 


ClllNllSif^ 

WarnerColorv 


STARRING 

ROSSANA  PODESTA  A JACK  SERNAS 


AS  *>-so 

PARIS -SIR 


WILL  KNOW  ITS  rOREATNESS! 

* ' ■ i 


^ Never  before  in  motion 
picture  history  has  an  attrac- 
tion received  such  industry- 
wide recognition! 


STARRING 


MUSIC  BY 
MAX  STEINER 


For  the  first  time  in  history! 


PUBLIC  and  CRITICS  ACREE! 


Winner  of  Both  Film  Daily’s 
National  Critics  Poll  and 
Annual  Audience  Awards! 


GOOD  MORNING, 
MISS  DOVE 


‘A  ROBERT  STACK 


PIAY  her  to  win  for  YOU! 

LOVE  IS  A MANY- 
SPLENDORED  THING 


*4  jf- 

r/ 


ii>? 


Her  Awcj'-d-w 

Perfo’'-nar 

co-sfarring 


WILLIAM  HOLDEN 


,m1 


GREGORY  PECK 
"V  THE  MAN  IN  THE 
GRAY  FLANNEL  SUIT 


W:  Hits  in  Cinemascope  I 


COLOR  by  DE  LUXE 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD 


MARTIN  QUIGLEY,  Editor-in-Chkf  and  Publisher 


Vol.  202,  No.  I 


MARTIN  QUIGLEY,  JR.,  Editor 


January  7,  1956 


Outlook  for  1956 

This  is  the  time  for  studying  the  record  of  the  past 
twelve  months  and  for  a look  ahead  at  the  pros- 
pects for  the  new  year.  Despite  a promising  be- 
ginning, 1955  must  be  recorded  as  another  year  of  read- 
justment for  the  motion  picture  industry.  From  the 
over-all  viewpoint  the  year  just  past  saw  theatre  grosses 
at  a good  level — one  of  the  highest  annual  totals  since 
the  World  War  II  boom.  However,  rising  costs  and  film 
rentals  made  it  difficult  for  many  theatres  to  operate  at 
satisfactory  profit  levels. 

Those  who  are  searching  for  some  miracle  to  restore 
in  a flash  “the  good  old  days”  had  better  apply  their 
talents  in  other  fields.  There  is  nothing  on  the  horizon 
that  is  going  to  double  theatre  grosses  and  keep  them 
on  such  a plane.  Furthermore  there  is  no  possibility 
that  other  forms  of  diversion  which  compete  for  the 
public’s  time  and  money  will  suddenly  vanish.  On  the 
other  hand  they  will  multiply  and  increase  in  appeal. 

Present  indications  are  that  1956  grosses  should  aver- 
age out  modestly  above  those  of  1955. 

Factors  which  point  to  this  moderate  increase  are ; 

PRODUCT  SUPPLY 

Although  statistics  show  that  the  low  point  in  produc- 
tion numerically  speaking,  was  reached  by  the  Holly- 
wood studios  in  1954,  the  increase  in  1955  was  slight. 
Many  theatres  in  all  kinds  of  runs  have  had  difficulty 
during  the  year  in  booking  suitable  attractions.  This 
so-called  “product  shortage”  will  continue  but  in  dim- 
inishing intensity.  There  are  several  reasons  why  more 
product  should  come  to  the  market  place  in  1956;  Holly- 
wood has  gotten  over  its  pessimistic  attitude ; Successful 
actors,  actresses  and  others  are  turning  to  independent 
production;  Outside  deals  are  being  made  even  by  MGM  ; 
and  United  Artists  and  Allied  Artists,  among  others,  are 
stepping  up  their  production  rate. 

Foreign-made  product,  including  pictures  financed  by 
American  firms  but  made  with  local  talents  and  also  in- 
dependent foreign  filming,  is  likely  to  win  more  playing 
time  than  ever  before  on  American  screens. 

PRODUCT  QUALITY 

1956,  as  every  year,  will  have  its  disappointments  and 
its  pleasant  surprises  in  the  form  of  “sleepers.”  However, 
in  part  due  to  the  factors  enumerated  which  will  increase 
production,  prospects  are  that  at  least  some  of  the  mo- 
tion pictures  will  be  better. 

Another  circumstance  which  influences  product  quality 
is  that  Hollywood  has  gotten  over  the  idea  that  size  alone 
spelled  grosses.  The  success  during  1955  of  some  rela- 
tively “small”  films  (in  black  and  white)  gave  courage 
to  the  many  who  still  believe  that  a picture  should  be 
made  in  the  scope  demanded  by  its  story.  While  it  is  of 


course  true  that  the  big  colorful  spectacles  should  con- 
tinue to  earn  high  grosses,  no  one  should  look  down  on 
the  potential  possibilities  of  any  film. 

TECHNIQUES 

After  the  mad  scramble  of  3-D  and  then  the  introduc- 
tion of  CinemaScope  with  its  anamorphic  lenses  and 
stereophonic  magnetic  sound  1955  was  relatively  quiet 
on  the  new  techniques  front.  It  was  a period  of  consoli- 
dation and  improvement.  The  way  was  being  prepared 
for  the  next  step  forward : The  development  of  a “road- 
show” and  big  drive-in  film  standard.  By  the  time  1956 
is  ended  an  observer  should  be  in  a better  position  than 
now  to  judge  whether  the  ultimate  victor  may  be  hori- 
zontally projected  VistaVision,  55.625mm.  CinemaScope, 
65mm.  wide  film  in  the  Todd-AO  or  some  other  system. 

The  most  important  premiere  of  the  year — technologi- 
cally speaking — was  the  opening  of  “Oklahoma !”  to  a 
somewhat  mixed  reaction.  A significant  development 
was  the  first  test  demonstrations  of  55.625mm.  Cinema- 
Scope as  reduced  to  35mm. 

With  television  being  improved  constantly  from  the 
technical  as  well  as  entertainment  standpoint,  motion 
picture  technical  developments  from  here  on  will  be  of 
high  importance  in  maintaining  the  industry’s  status. 

TAXES 

Whether  any  further  reduction  may  be  obtained  in  the 
Federal  admissions  tax  either  directly  or  as  a result  of 
an  increase  in  exemption  is  uncertain.  But  so  is  every- 
thing in  Washington,  especially  in  an  election  year.  Even 
those  who  question  the  advisability  of  a tax  reduction 
campaign  at  this  time  are  pledged  to  make  one  a year 
hence.  Further  relief  from  the  Federal  admissions  tax 
and  a simultaneous  fending  off  of  state  and  municipal 
encroachments  in  this  area  are  of  pressing  importance. 

WORLD  MARKET 

Granted  peace — or  at  the  most  only  small  scale,  limited 
conflict — and  a reasonable  improvement  in  exchange  con- 
trols, 1956  should  set  a record  in  the  international  market. 
It  should  be  a record  year  not  only  for  American  but 
also  British,  Italian,  German  and  other  countries’  film 
export.  The  motion  picture  industry  may  be  the  first 
American  major  industry  to  gross  more  from  abroad 
than  from  home.  This  may  happen  in  1956  when  grosses 
overseas  might  exceed  50  per  cent  of  the  world  total. 
This  would  not,  however,  mean  50  per  cent  of  the  earn- 
ing because  of  relatively  higher  distribution  costs  abroad. 

No  predictions  are  made  about  increases  in  harmony 
among  groups  in  the  trade  or  between  exhibitors  and  dis- 
tributors. Thus  any  welcome  improvement  can  come  as 
a surprise.  It  could  happen  in  1956. 

— Martin  Quigley,  Jr. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD 


cjCetterd  to  the  .-J^efaid 


January  7,  1956 


Clearance  Problem 

To  THE  Editor: 

For  many  years,  this  situation  was  able 
to  command  a print  availability  on  top  pic- 
tures with  28  days  of  national  release  date. 
Our  competitive  Malco  town  of  Henderson 
had  only  seven  days  clearance  over  us  and 
the  Crescent  Amusement  town  of  Prince- 
ton had  no  clearance  over  us.  Now  through 
print  shortages,  these  circuit  towns  are  able 
to  secure  from  one  to  three  months  clear- 
ance. Despite  this  arrangement  the  com- 
panies still  demand  from  us  40-50  per  cent 
on  many  pictures,  and  because  of  local  com- 
petition, we  are  obliged  to  submit  to  these 
terms.  This  combination  of  circumstances, 
plus  the  arrival  of  “A”  Television  reception 
only  two  years  ago,  has  made  the  operation 
of  this  situation  not  only  unprofitable,  but 
we  are  actually  suffering  a loss.  Only  a 
change  in  conditions  or  some  local  improve- 
ment would  justify  the  continued  operation 
of  this  and  the  two  other  small  towns  I 
operate. — IV.  E.  HORSEFIELD,  Morgan 
Theatre,  Morganfield,  Ky. 


Fine  Editorial 

To  THE  Editor: 

Congratulations  on  the  fine  editorial,  “Mr. 
Johnston  Meets  the  Press”  which  was  pub- 
lished in  the  December  24  issue  of  The 
Herald. 

There  is  too  much  pessimistic  thinking 
today  in  our  business.  Mr.  Johnston  is  not 
the  only  person  who  has  issued  public  state- 


ments of  doom  for  our  business.  Our  eve- 
ning paper  the  other  night  had  Erskine 
Johnson’s  column  in  which  he  stated  a high 
official  of  one  of  the  major  Hollywood  stu- 
dios said  if  new  faces  were  not  soon  found, 
the  motion  picture  industry  was  doomed. 

It  is  also  advisable  that  all  trade  papers 
keep  an  optimistic  rather  than  pessimistic 
approach  to  the  situation. 

Already  statements  like  Eric  Johnston 
gave  out,  and  publicity  like  Erskine  Johnson 
wrote,  plus  articles  which  have  appeared 
in  trade  papers,  are  having  their  effect  on 
the  young  men  in  our  business,  some  of 
whom  are  leaving  to  enter  other  fields.  And 
certainly  with  all  the  pessimistic  publicity 
we  can’t  hope  to  attract  newcomers  to  our 
business. 

It’s  like  my  wife  said  to  me  the  other 
night:  “You  don’t  read  anything  happy 
about  the  movie  business  anymore,  do  you?” 
— EARLE  M.  HOLDEN , Lucas  and  Avon 
Theatres,  Savannah,  Ga. 


TV  Impact 

We  are  having  a hard  time  making  our 
movie  house  pay  because,  since  television 
has  come,  so  many  people  stay  at  home. 
Some  send  their  children,  but  they  get  in 
for  twelve  cents,  and  the  older  ones  stay  at 
home.  They  claim  they  can  see  the  same 
people  on  television.  We  locked  our  theatre 
up  for  seven  months  last  year  on  account  of 
the  crowds  being  so  small. — ELLA  LIND- 
SEY, Page  Theatre,  Page,  N.  D. 


Page 

THE  LITTLE  MAN  from  Mars  wrig- 


gles antennae  at  1955  12 

COLUMBIA  follows  RKO  in  selling 
films  to  TV  13 

SENATE  HEARING  on  exhibitor 
plaints  set  for  February  2 16 

MGM  led  film  parade  at  Music  Hall 
for  1955  16 

RAMSAYE  finally  vindicated  on 
legend  of  Friese  Greene  17 

HERALD  SURVEY  In  Britain  shows 
seven  English  films  in  top  12  20 

20TH-FOX  boosts  product  budget; 
CinemaScope  55  pushed  21 

NATIONAL  SPOTLIGHT— Notes  on 
personnel  across  country  29 

SERVICE  DEPARTMENTS 

Refreshment  Merchandising  42-50 

Film  Buyers'  Rating  35 

Hollywood  Scene  23 

Managers'  Round  Table  37 

The  Winners'  Circle  26 


In 


for  JANUARY 


Section  begins  opposite  50 
LOOKING  AHEAD  in  Theatre  Design 
PROJECTION  System  Simplification 
GLAMOR5COPE  for  Better  Showmanship 


FOR  THE  RECORD 

Motion  Picture  Herald  Presents 
The  Box  Office  Hits 


Battle  Cry  (W.B.) 

Blackboard  Jungle  (MGM) 

The  Bridges  at  Toko-Ri  (Par.) 

The  Country  Girl  (Par.) 

Lady  and  the  Tramp  (Disney) 

The  Lett  Hand  of  God  (20th-Fox) 
The  Long  Gray  Line  (Col.) 

Love  Is  a Many-Splendored  Thing 
(20th-Fox) 

Love  Me  or  Leave  Me  (MGM) 

A Man  Called  Peter  (20th-Fox) 

Mr.  Roberts  (V/.B.) 


of  1955 

Not  As  a Stranger  (U.A.) 
The  Seven  Little  Foys  (Par.) 
The  Seven  Year  Itch  (20th-Fox) 
A Star  Is  Born  (V\^.B.) 
Strategic  Air  Command  (Par.) 
To  Hell  and  Back  (U-!) 

There's  No  Business  Like  Show  Business 

(20th-Fox) 

20,000  Leagues  Under  the  Sea 

(Disney) 

Vera  Cruz  (U.A.) 


IN  PRODUCT  DIGEST  SECTION 

REVIEWS  (In  Product  Digest);  Ransom, 
The  Lone  Ranger,  The  Lieutenant  Wore 
Skirts,  The  Fighting  Chance,  The  Houston 
Story,  Diabolique,  This  Strange  Passion 


Showmen's  Reviews  729 

Short  Subjects  Chart  730 

What  the  Picture  Did  for  Me  731 

The  Release  Chart  732 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  Martin  Quigley,  Edi+«r-in- 
Chief  and  Publisher;  Martin  Quigley,  Jr.,  Editor;  Raymond 
Levy,  Executive  Publisher;  James  D.  Ivers,  News  Witor; 
Charles  S.  Aaronson,  Production  Editor;  Floyd  £.  St^e, 
Photo  Editor;  Ray  Gallagher,  Advertising  Manager;  Gijs 
H.  Fausel  Production  Manager.  Bureous:  Hollywood, 

Samuel  D.  Berns.  Manager:  William  R.  Weover.  Editor, 
Yucca-Vine  Building,  Telephone  HOIlywood  7-2145; 
Chicago,  120  So.  LoSolle  St.,  Urbcn  Farley,  Advertising 
Representative,  Telephone  Financial  6-3074;  Washington, 
J.  A.  Otten,  Notional  Press  Club;  London,  Hope_ Williams 
Burnup,  Manager;  Peter  Burnup,  Editor;  William_  Pay, 
News  Editor,  4 Golden  Square.  Correspondents  in  the 
principal  capitals  of  the  world.  Member  Audit  Bureau  of 
Circulations.  Motion  Picture  Herald  is  published  every 
Saturdoy  by  Quigley  Publishing  Compony,  Inc.,  Rocke- 
feller Center,  New  York  City  20.  Telephone  Circle  7-3100; 
Coble  address;  "Quigpubco,  New  York",  Martin  Quigley, 
President'  Martin  Quigley,  Jr.,  Vice-President;  Theo.  J. 
Sullivan,  Vice-Presidenit  and  Treasurer;  Raymond  Levy, 
Vice-President,  Leo  J.  Brody,  Secretary.  Cther  Quigley 
Publications:  Better  Theatres  and  Better  Refreshment  Mer- 
chandising, each  published  thirteen  times  a year  os  a 
section  of  Motion  Picture  Herald;  Motion  Picture  Doily, 
Television  Today,  Motion  Picture  Almanac,  Television 
Almanac,  Fame. 


[The  pictures  above  are  listed  alphabethically  by  title. \ 


8 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


(^n  the  JJ'i 


ovizon 


NEWSWEEK ' S NOD 

"Newsweek  Magazine,"  in  its 
January  9 issue,  gives  a very 
special  nod  in  the  direction  of 
Hollywood  and  the  very  special 
product  to  be  forthcoming  in 
1956.  The  magazine  informs  the 
layman  that  the  new  year  will  be 
the  year  of  the  Big  Frame  (55mm) 
and  Big  Budget  and  tells  of  ex- 
citing release  schedules  which 
include  "The  Ten  Commandments," 
"Giant,"  "The  Man  in  The  Gray 
Flannel  Suit,"  "Picnic,"  "The 
Benny  Goodman  Story,"  "The  Swan" 
and  "The  Conqueror."  But  receiv- 
ing the  major  share  of  the  atten- 
tion in  the  four-page  special 
report  is  Warner  Brothers  ' "Moby 
Dick"  and  its  fabled  director 
John  Huston.  This  picture,  says 
"Newsweek,"  may  well  be  "one  of 
the  great  pictures  of  the  decade 
if  not  the  century."  Quite  a 
send-off  ! 

1.000  FILMS  FOR  TV 

During  the  past  five  years, 
WCBS-TV  in  New  York  has  shown 
more  than  1,000  feature  films 
that  had  never  been  seen  before 
on  New  York  television,  accord- 
ing to  Sam  Cook  Digges,  general 
manager,  who  also  said  the  sta- 
tion presented  207  films  in  1955 
on  its  "Early  Show"  and  "Late 
Show. " 

NOT  WANTED 

The  Russians  and  their  allies 
wouldn't  show  most  American 
films  even  "if  we  gave  them 
free",  publisher  William  Ben- 
ton, returning  from  four  weeks 
in  the  USSR  and  eastern  European 
countries,  asserted  in  New  York 
recently.  He  declared  that  the 
Soviets  are  interested  only  in 
pictures  defaming  this  country, 
and  he  congratulated  the  Ameri- 
can film  industry  for  not  allow- 
ing "hand-picking"  of  its  prod- 
uct . 

GOING  TO  ^ PUBLIC 

J.  Arthur  Rank,  who  claims 
there  is  prejudice  here,  or  a 
conspiracy  or  some  species  of 
movement  to  prevent  showing  of 
British,  and  certainly  Rank, 
pictures  — Wednesday  morning 
went  to  the  American  people . Ad- 


vertising on  a full  page  of  the 
"New  York  Times",  his  company 
cited  with  stills  and  critical 
comment  pictures  such  as  "The 
Cruel  Sea",  "The  Purple  Plain", 
"Genevieve"  and  "Simba" , pointed 
out  their  renowned  stars,  inter- 
esting and  action-ful  stories, 
and  tumultuous  acclaim  in  other 
countries,  demolished  the  argu- 
ments about  "accents",  and  asked 
the  American  movie-goer  to  tell 
his  local  exhibitor  he  wants  to 
see  the  best  in  British  pictures. 

NEXT  YEAR,  BOOKS 

To  newswriters  of  the  tele- 
vision industry  recently  came 
old-fashioned  "ex-libris" 
(bookplates  to  you)  fashioned 
and  dedicated  in  modern  form  and 
verse.  Said  the  verse  (best 
wishes  for  the  holiday  season 
from  ABC-TV)  — "God  bless  my 
television  set/Most  fabulous  of 
toys/But  pity  me  if  I forget/ 
Bibliophilic  joys.  ..."  Could 
this  be  the  modern  television 
publicist  aghast  at  what  he  and 
his  master  have  wrought? 

APPRAISAL 

Mr.  Alfred  Hitchcock,  the  man 
who  is  presenting  these  days, 
television  shows  (on  film,  to  be 
sure)  has  indicated  a choice  of 
mediums,  publicly.  And  we  quote. 
The  other  day,  interviewed  in 
Hollywood  after  returning  from 
two  months  around  the  world,  the 
famed  suspense  man  told  the 
press:  "If  I find  TV  gets  too 
big.  I'll  drop  it."  Mr.  Hitch- 
cock's shows  currently,  cer- 
tainly keep  some  people  home, 
and  this  is  mere  speculation, 
from  pictures  in  theatres  such 
as  "The  Trouble  With  Harry". 

GOING  OUT 

Amusement  advertising  in 
Christmas  Day  editions  of  the 
"Chicago  Tribune"  set  a record 
this  year,  that  paper  informs 
us,  and  deduces:  "People  just 
don't  stay  home  the  way  they  used 
to  over  the  Christmas  holidays". 
The  paper  on  the  festive  day  car- 
ried more  than  11,000  lines. 
This  included  a full  page  in 
color  f 0 r the  1956  Hollywood  Ice 


WHEN  AND  WHERE 

January  14:  Induction  of  new  officers  of 
the  Variety  Club  of  San  Francisco,  Fair- 
mont Hotel,  San  Francisco. 

January  14:  Installation  of  new  officers  of 
The  Colosseum  of  Indianapolis,  Variety 
Club  headquarters,  Indianapolis. 

January  29:  Sixth  annual  Communion 

Brealcfast  for  Catholics  of  the  motion 
picture  industry  in  the  New  York  area, 
Waldorf-Astoria  Hotel,  New  York  City. 

January  29-31:  Annual  convention  of  the 
Theatre  Owners  of  North  and  South 
Carolina,  Hotel  Charlotte,  Charlotte, 
N.  C. 

January  30:  Regular  mid-winter  meeting 

of  the  lATSE  general  executive  board, 
Hollywood-Roosevelt  Hotel,  Hollywood. 

February  2:  Commencement  of  hearings, 

before  the  Senate  Small  Business  Sub- 
committee, on  trade  practice  complaints 
of  motion  picture  exhibitors,  Washing- 
ton, D.  C. 

February  5:  Fifth  annual  Communion 

Breakfast  for  Catholics  of  the  motion  pic- 
ture industry  In  the  Los  Angeles  area, 
Hollywood  Paladium,  Hollywood. 

February  7-9:  Annual  convention  of  United 
Theatre  Owners  of  Oklahoma,  Skirvin 
Hotel,  Oklahoma  Oity.  j 

February  20:  Testimonial  winner  to  M.  B. 
Horwitz,  veteran  Cleveland  motion  pic- 
ture exhibitor.  Hotel  Hollenden,  Cleve- 
land. 

February  21-23:  1956  National  Drive-In 

Convention,  Hotel  Cleveland,  Cleveland. 

March  6-7:  Annual  convention  of  the 

Kansas-Missouri  Theatre  Association, 
President  Hotel,  Kansas  City,  Mo. 


Review  at  the  Chicago  Stadium, 
and  another  in  black-and-white 
for  MGM's  "I'll  Cry  Tomorrow"  at 
the  United  Artists  Theatre. 

BILLION  DOLLAR  GROSS 

Total  sales  of  products  and 
services  by  Radio  Corporation 
of  America  for  1955  will  exceed 
a billion  dollars  for  the  first 
time  in  company  history.  Brig. 
General  David  Sarnoff , chairman 
of  the  board,  announced  in  a 
year-end  statement.  He  said  it 
was  equivalent  to  more  than 
$4,000,000  business  for  each 
working  day  of  the  year. 

Floyd  E.  Stone — Vincent 

Canby — William  R.  Weaver 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


9 


t 


HE’S  THE  CHAMPION  SHOWMAN.  That's  C.  E.  Rainey  on  the  right,  manager  of  the  Odeon 
Theatre  in  Norwich,  England;  and  he's  receiving  his  "Golden  Harvest"  Showmanship  Contest 
winner's  trophy  from  the  head  of  his  organization,  J.  Arthur  Rank,  at  the  annual  presentation 
in  London.  Some  250  managers,  district  and  home  office  executives  attended  the  luncheon  at 
the  Dorchester  Hotel  as  guests  of  John  Davis,  general  manager  of  the  Rank  Organization. 


by  the  Herald 


IT'S  "SIR  TOM  O'BRIEN"  for  the  Socialist 
Member  of  Parliament  well  known  to  the 
British  industry  for  bluntness  and  color — and 
as  general  secretary  of  the  National  Asso- 
ciation of  Theatrical  and  Kine  Employees. 
Queen  Elizabeth  last  weekend  awarded  Tom 
a knighthood. 


CLARENCE  J.  SCHNEIDER 
now  is  assistant  manager  of 
the  United  Artists  foreign  pub- 
licity department,  in  New  York. 
He  replaced  Ben  Halpern,  who 
this  week  took  over  European 
and  Near  Eastern  publicity,  in 
Paris.  Mr.  Schneider  was  for 
many  years  with  Columbia  In- 
ternational. 


THE  HEART  OF  SHOW  BUSINESS  (film  d ivision)  turned  out  the  other  night 
for  singer  Lillian  Roth's  story,  MGM's  "I'll  Cry  Tomorrow  at  the  Four  Star 
Theatre,  Los  Angeles.  It  was  a red  carpet  affair  for  the  personalities  to  the 
manner  accustomed.  Hosts  were  MGM  executive  producer  Dore  Schary,  in  the 
top  photo  with  producer  Lawrence  Weingarten,  right;  and  Miss  Roth,  below, 
shown  with  guests  Eddie  Fisher  and  Debbie  Reynolds. 


I 


m- 


) r 

t ' 


!■ 


I 


1 


i 


I 


I 


GARY  COOPER  told  trade  and  news  writers  last  week  in  New 
York,  where  he  performed  the  rites  at  publicity  functions  nec- 
essary to  promote  Warners'  "The  Court  Martial  of  Billy  Mitchell 
— that  the  late  Air  General  and  prophet  without  immediate 
honor  had  perception,  prescience,  and  even  genius,  and  the 
more  he  studied  the  history  the  more  he  appreciated  the  role 
and  the  man.  Mr.  Cooper,  whose  immersion  in  the  starring  role 
fascinated  his  listeners,  was  their  host  for  luncheon  at  Sardi  s. 


by  the  Herald 


JOSE  FERRER  AND  ROSE- 
MARY CLOONEY,  two  of  the 
hundreds  of  guests  at  the  Fox 
Beverly  Theatre,  Los  Angeles, 
opening  of  United  Artists' 
"The  Man  With  The  Golden 
Arm." 


THE  PERSONAL  PROMOTER; 
that's  Kirk  Douglas,  center  be- 
low, on  tour  for  his  first  pic- 
ture, Bryna  Productions'  "The 
Indian  Fighter."  In  Denver, 
he's  flanked  by  Tom  Smiley, 
left,  Wolfberg  Theatres  gen- 
eral manager,  and  Jack  Wod- 
ell,  district  manager.  Mr. 
Douglas  visited  12  cities. 


by  the  Herald 

NEW  YEAR'S  BUSINESS,  literally,  was  discussed  first  thing 
Tuesday  morning  by  Seymour  Poe,  above,  at  the  New  York 
office  of  Italian  Films  Export,  where  he  heads  a revived 
operation  as  its  executive  vice-president.  He  reported  that 
during  his  recent  three  weeks  abroad,  directors  in  Rome 
approved  his  policies  present  and  planned;  that  he  screened 
31  pictures  and  because  he  insists  on  extreme  selectivity 
chose  only  three;  that  directors  liked  his  suggestion  he  send 
to  Italy  for  general  guidance  of  producers  a genuine  Holly- 
wood story  editor;  that  his  company  now  can  give  guarantees 
to  European  producers,  and  meeting  in  Paris  later  with 
French  picture  makers  he  was  impressed  by  the  new  friendli- 
ness; that  he  is  considering  a German  importation  of  some 
consequence;  and  that  IFE  may  bring  in  12  features  this  year 
— all  good  enough  to  deserve  support.  He  added  his  com- 
pany in  February  will  begin  giving  exhibitors  press  kits  and 
personal  advice  on  getting  the  most  from  foreign  films.  And 
he  wanted  it  known  that  except  for  majors  and  "sub-majors" 
his  is  the  only  company  which  controls  its  ad  departments 
and  exchanges  in  key  cities  100  per  cent. 

DEAN  MARTIN  and  Jerry  Lewis,  suitably  attired  on  loca- 
tion near  Phoenix,  for  Paramount's  "Pardners,"  are  hosts  to 
Mabel  Mitchell,  advertising  and  publicity  director  for 
Arizona  Paramount  Theatres. 


THE  LITTLE  GUY  FROM  MARS 
WRIGGLES  ANTENNA  AT  1955 


by  VINCENT  CANBY 

"I  am  one  week  la+e  to  the  day,"  said  the  little  man  from 
Mars,  "but  you  can  blame  it  on  last  week's  crowds  pushing  into 
Radio  City  Music  Hall."  The  speaker,  of  course,  was  Etaoin 
Shrdiu,  Herald  correspondent  from  outer  space  who  dropped  by 
early  this  week  with  his  annual  report. 

"Just  look  at  me,"  he  said  irritably.  His  ordinarily  lavender 
complexion  was  a deathly  flesh  color;  his  antenna,  usually 
straight  and  in-tune,  looked  like  an  old  bedspring.  "Every 
time  I tried  to  get  through  the  mob,"  he  explained,  "I  was 
whisked  into  the  theatre  by  a nearsighted  mother.  It  was  my 
kismet  to  see  'Kismet'  a total  of  36  times." 

He  shrugged,  threw  his  crumpled  space  suit  over  the  back  of 
a chair  and  settled  down  for  the  serious  business  at  hand. 

"First  off,"  he  said  thoughtfully,  "I'd  say  we  have  a rather 
exciting  12-month  upcoming,  leading  off  with  the  start  February 
2 of  those  Senate  Small  Business  Subcommittee  hearings  on 
motion  picture  industry  trade  practices.  Heaven  only  knows 
what  the  effect  of  election  year  propaganda  will  have  on  them! 
If  the  campaign  becomes  bitter,  those  Senators  will  be  making 
a lot  of  promises  to  a lot  of  people,  including  irate  exhibitors. 


"THE  coming  months  should  also  see  some  clari- 
fication in  the  toll  TV  picture,"  he  continued,  and  added: 
"Politics  may  very  well  play  a role  here  too,  should  the  Federal 
Communications  Commission  decide  it  hasn't  the  authority  to 
decide  the  issue. 

"Also  from  Washington,  and  to  be  awaited  with  what  you 
fellows  call  'keen  interest,'  will  be  a Justice  Department  decision 
on  that  arbitration  system,  espoused  most  prominently  by  dis- 
tribution and  Theatres  Owners  of  America,  and  rejected  most 
articulately  by  Allied  States  Association.  The  question  is  whether 
or  not  the  draft  will  receive  Justice's  'green  light.'  " As  an 
after-thought,  he  said  that  during  one  of  the  showings  of  "Kis- 
met," an  anxious  dowager  unfortunately  had  sat  on  his  crystal 
ball:  "I'd  like  to  give  you  some  idea  about  what  to  expect,  but 
all  I get  now  are  weather  reports  from  Moline." 

On  the  year  just  completed,  however,  Etaoin  was  on  a firmer 
footing.  "My  choice  of  Man  of  the  Year,"  he  said,  "is  Judge  Leon 
R.  Yankwich  ('Millions  for  defense  but  not  one  cent  for  tribute'). 
Oops!"  Adjusting  a dial  on  his  stomach,  Etaoin  explained  that 
his  Time  Mechanism  needed  a new  washer.  What  he  had  meant 
to  quote  was  the  judge's  famous  "There  are  no  illegitimate  chil- 
dren, only  illegitimate  parents." 


JUDGE  YANKWICH'S  80-page  decision  absolv- 
ing the  film  companies  of  any  guilt  of  "unreasonable  restraint 
of  trade"  in  the  16mm  suit,  said  the  little  Martian,  provided  the 
top  and  certainly  the  most  welcome  news  story  of  the  year. 
"At  the  very  core,  it  was  a ridiculous  suit,"  he  commented. 

"I'd  say  the  next  most  important  single  event,"  he  continued, 
"was  the  purchase,  in  July  and  for  $25,000,000  in  cash,  of  RKO 
Radio  Pictures,  lock,  stock,  studios  and  film  library,  from  Howard 
Hughes  by  Thomas  F.  O'Neil  and  his  General  Tire  and  Rubber 
Company.  At  this  point,  now  that  the  film  library  has  finally 
been  disposed  of  (to  Matthew  Fox),  it  seems  the  company  is 
going  to  make  a conscientious  effort  to  regain  a position  among 
the  major  product  suppliers. 

"This  being  the  era  of  teams.  I'd  say  that  RKO  has  one  of 
the  most  promising,  headed  by  Daniel  T.  O'Shea,  as  president, 
and  William  Dozier,  as  executive  vice-president  in  charge  of 
production,  to  say  nothing  of  a roster  of  producers  to  be 
sparked  by  such  as  David  Seiznick." 

Etaoin  then  touched  on  the  resignation  of  Nicholas  Schenck 


as  president  of  Loew's  after  a tenure  in  office  of  28  years, 
followed  by  the  election  of  Arthur  Loew  as  his  successor.  "Mr. 
Schenck  will  continue  to  be  a dominant  force  in  the  industry" 
is  the  way  Etaoin  put  it,  and  he  added  that  there  was  "some- 
thing inherently  right"  in  the  succession  of  Mr.  Loew. 

"And  while  we're  on  the  subject  of  things  corporate,"  he 
continued,  "don't  overlook  the  resignation,  in  March,  of  A.  W. 
Schwalberg  as  president  of  Paramount  Film  Distributing  Com- 
pany, and  the  appointment  of  George  Weltner  as  head  of 
Paramount's  new,  single,  worldwide  sales  and  distributing  organ- 
ization. Nor  that  fairly  tumultuous  Republic  Pictures  annual 
meeting  in  April,  where  Herbert  Yates  was  reported  to  have 
threatened  to  quit  movies  for  TV.  Nor  the  peripatetic  Spyros 
Skouras'  purchase  in  July  for  his  20th  Century-Fox  of  the  Scliles- 
inger  theatre  interests  in  South  Africa." 

• 

SPEAKING  of  Mr.  Skouras  naturally  led  Etaoin  to 
the  subject  of  new  screen  techniques.  "As  I predicted — or,  at 
least,  as  I should  have  predicted — last  year,"  he  said,  "1955  was 
the  year  of  the  increased  area  negative,  led  off  (actually  in  late 
1954)  by  Paramount's  first  commercial  demonstrations  of  its 
double-frame,  horizontally  projected  VistaVision.  This  was  fol- 
lowed by  the  first  engagement  in  October  of  "Oklahoma!"  in 
the  65mm  Todd-AO  process;  the  announced  intentions  of  MGM 
to  shoot  in  its  own  65mm  process,  and  by  20th-Fox's  actual 
shooting  in  its  own  55mm  CinemaScope  of  the  forthcoming 
"Carousel." 

Elsewhere  in  his  discussion  of  the  techniques,  Etaoin  made 
mention  of  the  Cine-Miracle  process — the  reportedly  inexpensive 
Cinerama-like  process  being  backed  by  National  Theatres;  of  the 
continued  popularity  of  Cinerama  itself  in  its  second,  travelogue 
type  of  release,  "Cinerama  Holiday,"  and  of  the  "omnibus"  type 
of  prints  now  being  supplied  by  several  companies  and  which 
contain  both  optical  and  magnetic  sound  tracks.  "I  remain 
apprehensive  about  the  quality  of  these,"  he  added.  He  also 
spoke  briefly  of  Walt  Disney's  360-degree  Circarama,  which 
made  its  debut  this  summer  at  Disneyland:  "great  for  Martians." 

• 

ASKED  what  he  thought  about  the  intra-industry 
trade  practice  picture,  Etaoin  said  something  to  the  effect 
that  please,  he  had  just  eaten.  Then,  seriously:  "At  the  begin- 
ning of  1955  I was  really  quite  hopeful.  I remained  optimistic 
through  those  series  of  joint  exhibitors  talks  with  the  major  com- 
panies in  May,  June  and  July.  Then  whammo!  One  night  I 
went  to  bed  hearing  various  Allied  and  TOA  people  talking 
about  merger,  and  I wake  up  with  each  organization  promising 
'white  papers'  on  the  other's  misconduct.  To  top  it  off,  there's 
a ruckus  about  COMPO  dues. 

"So  where  are  we?  At  its  convention  in  October  TOA 
backed  up  arbitration,  reaffirmed  its  faith  in  COMPO  and  its 
antagonism  to  Government  regulation.  Two  weeks  later  Allied 
ridiculed  arbitration,  pulled  out  of  COMPO  and  promised  a 
drive  for  Federal  control.  How  naive  can  I be?" 

Etaoin  remarked  that  in  spite  of  all  this  the  COMPO  audience 
awards  campaign  in  November  was  a success  even  though  his 
favorite,  the  Creature,  didn't  place  in  either  of  the  male  cate- 
gories. ("One  man's  Creature  is  another  man's  William  Holden.") 

Night  was  falling  when  Etaoin  suddenly  remembered  he  had  a 
date  in  Washington,  to  give  Kefauver  a run-down  on  delinquency 
on  Mars.  "I’m  also  going  to  ask  him  if  he  ever  got  to  see  War- 
ners' 'Rebel  Without  a Cause,'  the  film  he  was  criticizing  at 
those  Hollywood  hearings  and  which  hadn't  even  been  made 
yet."  Time  was  running  out  as  the  little  Martian  began  to  fade 
away,  mumbling  something  about  production  costs  and  new 
lATSE  wage  contracts. 


12 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  7.  1956 


COLVMBIA  FOLLOWS  RKO 
IN  SALE-TO-TV  PARADE 


Through  Its  Screen  Gems 
Firm  Makes  Available 
104  Features  to  TV 

The  wedding  of  films  and  television  con- 
tinued to  make  news  this  week.  Columbia 
Pictures  said  it  had  authorized  its  wholly- 
owned  television  subsidiary,  Screen  Gems,  to 
release  a group  of  104  feature  films.  “This 
does  not  constitute  a sale,”  the  statement 
said,  “we  will  maintain  our  title  to  the  pic- 
tures and  to  all  residual  rights.”  The  titles 
of  the  pictures  were  not  disclosed. 

Last  week  RKO  sold  its  entire  library  for 
television  release  and  theatrical  distribution 
abroad. 

The  Columbia  statement  said  that  the 
release  of  the  films  to  television  “takes 
cognizance  of  the  changing  character  of 
our  business  and  the  need  for  all  com- 
panies to  remain  fluid  and  flexible.  As  a 
matter  of  good  business  judgment,  our 
management  has  decided  that  it  wants  to 
study  at  first  hand  the  potential  of  the 
television  market  as  it  relates  to  feature 
pictures  which  have  already  been  reissued 
theatrically  and  are  now  dormant  in  a so- 
called  ‘backlog.’  ” 

The  company  added  that  the  move  would 
also  provide  it  with  additional  working  cap- 
ital for  the  expanded  theatrical  production 
program  “in  which  we  are  now  engaged  and 
which  will  be  further  accelerated  in  the  im- 
mediate future.” 

Columbia  or  Screen  Gems  officials  could 
not  be  reached  for  further  elaboration  last 
week  but  it  was  confirmed  the  films  involved 
were  made  prior  to  August,  1948,  the  cut-off 
date  of  various  guilds  in  determining  fees  for 
pictures  sold  to  television. 

Paramount  Sells  Shorts  to 
U.  M.  & M.  TV  Corporation 

Another  major  company,  Paramount  Pic- 
tures, sold  outright  the  negative  rights  to 
1,600  shorts  produced  and  released  through 
September,  1950,  to  U.  M & M.  TV  Corp., 
it  was  announced  by  the  latter.  In  addition, 
U.  M.  & M.  has  been  granted  first  option 
rights  on  any  short  subjects  and  cartoons 
Paramount  may  wish  to  release  to  the  tele- 
vision markets  in  the  future.  The  television 
company  may  rent  the  films  for  television 
use  anywhere  in  the  world  and  for  theatre 
showings  outside  the  U.  S.  and  Canada, 
which  is  similar  to  the  RKO  deal. 

A.  W.  Schwalberg,  former  president  of 
Paramount  Film  Distributing  Corp.,  repre- 
sented Charles  M.  Amory,  U.  M.  & M.  presi- 
dent, in  negotiating  the  deal  with  Barney 
Balaban,  Paramount  president.  The  purchase 
was  said  to  represent  the  largest  number  of 
shorts  ever  released  to  television  markets. 

In  still  another  deal  Trans-Lux  Pictures 
bought  exclusive  television  and  theatrical 


distribution  rights  to  the  Encyclopedia 
Britannica  Films  library  for  a 10-year 
period,  it  was  announced  by  Richard  Brandt, 
Trans-Lux  Pictures  vice-president.  En- 
cyclopedia Britannica  specializes  in  educa- 
tional films. 

Under  the  deal,  Mr.  Brandt  said,  “we 
have  a right  to  choose”  which  educational 
films  will  be  marketed.  He  added  that  in 
addition  to  the  library  of  some  700  educa- 
tional shorts,  Trans-Lux  Pictures  will  have 
access  to  the  current  and  future  production 
of  Britannica  Films,  which  makes  from  50 
to  60  educational  shorts  per  year. 

The  television  distribution  rights  will  ac- 
crue to  Trans-Lux  in  six  to  eight  months 
while  theatrical  distribution  rights  go  into 
effect  immediately,  Mr.  Brandt  said.  He 
added  that  his  company  will  begin  the  the- 
atrical distribution  by  composing  a package 
of  10  to  20  films,  some  of  which  will  be 
marketed  in  conjunction  with  the  firm’s  fea- 
ture films. 

Exhibition  Worried  by 
RKO  Deal  Repercussions 

Reaction  in  exhibition  circles  to  the  ac- 
quisition of  the  RKO  films  varied  last  week. 
Some  officials  felt  that  many  films  in  the 
deal  will  make  stiff  competition  to  current 
theatrical  product  and  may  make  a serious 
dent  in  theatre  patronage. 

Gerald  Shea,  president  of  the  Shea  circuit, 
said,  however,  “If  RKO  is  going  to  use  the 
money  to  provide  working  capital  for  new 
pictures  which  will  go  to  theatres  first  with 
a proper  clearance  before  they  are  sold  to 
TV,  I think  it  could  be  a good  thing.”  He 
added  he  did  not  advocate  such  sales  to  tele- 
vision, but  that  there  is  nothing  that  can  be 
done  to  alter  such  deals  once  they  are  con- 
summated but  to  demand  that  proper  clear- 
ances be  given  to  theatres  before  any  the- 
atrical motion  pictures  are  shown  on  TV. 

One  exhibitor  organization  leader  said 
the  deal  represented  no  surprises.  It  was  ex- 
pected with  General  Teleradio’s  acquisition 
of  RKO  Radio  Pictures,  he  added,  and  it’s 


CBS  NEGOTIATING 
FOR  TERRYTOONS 

Negotiations  tor  the  purchase  by 
the  Columbia  Broadcasting  System  of 
all  the  assets  of  Paul  Terry's  Terry- 
toons,  Inc.,  were  reported  last  week 
to  be  reaching  the  final  stage,  al- 
though the  principals  could  not  be 
reached  for  comment.  It  is  under- 
stood the  network  would  take  over 
100  per  cent  stock  of  the  company, 
in  addition  to  more  than  1,100  car- 
toons and  merchandising  - licensing 
rights  to  the  Terrytoon  characters. 


hard  to  tell  what  the  consequences  at  the 
boxoffice  will  be  at  this  time. 

Other  exhibitors  were  more  pessimistic. 
These  exhibitors,  representing  first-run 
houses  to  suburban  situations,  felt  that  the 
impact  of  the  RKO  product  sale  may  even- 
tually force  some  small  houses  to  close  down, 
especially  in  areas  around  the  country  where 
there  is  a heavy  saturation  of  television. 
One  of  these  exhibitors  said,  “Some  of  these 
quality  RKO  Pictures,  such  as  the  Ginger 
Roger  s-Fred  Astaire  musicals,  will  give 
some  good  first-run  situations,  which  are 
presently  confronted  with  a shortage  of  con- 
tinuous good  product,  a good  fight  in  at- 
tracting patronage.” 

Sees  Possibility  of  Sales 
By  Other  Distributors 

One  circuit  operator  said  once  these  pic- 
tures start  their  exhibition  on  television  and 
begin  attracting  big  home  audiences,  “which 
normally  would  go  to  theatres  for  film  en- 
tertainment,” it  is  then  possible  that  other 
film  companies  might  sell  or  lease  their  film 
libraries  to  television.  “I  am  aware  that  the 
major  producer-distributors  have  said  that 
they  will  not  sell  their  old  films  to  televi- 
sion, but  they  sure  can  change  their  minds,” 
he  added. 

Top  executives  of  the  film  companies  in 
New  York  refused  to  comment  on  the  effect 
of  the  RKO  product  on  television  to  theatres 
and  whether  their  companies  would  change 
their  policy  in  regard  to  selling  their  feature 
libraries.  However,  one  top  network  execu- 
tive felt  that  the  chance  of  further  sales  com- 
parable to  the  RKO  deal  is  remote.  He  said 
there  is  not  enough  time  available  on  televi- 
sion at*  this  point  to  absorb  the  amount  of 
film  which  would  accrue  from  such  deals. 


O'Shea  Leaves  Paramount; 
Heads  Sales  for  Magna 

E.  K.  O’Shea,  sales  executive,  this  week 
disclosed  he  is  leaving  Patemount  and  with- 
in a few  weeks  will  be  at  Magna  Theatres 
Corporation  as  vice-president  and  world 
sales  manager.  He  is  leaving  after  nine 
years  and  with  the  “regret”  of  his  chief, 
Barney  Balaban,  Paramount  president.  Mr. 
O’Shea  came  to  the  company  when  it  pur- 
chased control  of  Liberty  Pictures.  Previ- 
ously, for  many  years,  he  was  with  Loew’s 
as  eastern  and  southern  sales  manager. 

The  new  association  is  assumed  to  mean 
acceleration  of  “Oklahoma !”  distribution 
plans.  Mr.  O’Shea  was  vice-president  of 
Paramount  Film  Distributing  Corporation. 
His  resignation  produced  the  following  re- 
alignment, announced  Wednesday:  Hugh 
Owen,  vice-president,  goes  from  western  to 
eastern  sales  managership;  and  Sidney  G. 
Deaneau,  who  had  been  Mr.  O’Shea’s  as- 
sistant, becomes  western  sales  manager. 


13 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


• 

m 

YES — Friday,  the  13th  of  January, 
1956,  is  the  lucky  day  when 
everyone  goes  to  one  big  nation- 
wide screening  — to  be  held 
simultaneously  in  theatres  in 
32  exchange  cities.  Exhibitors, 
press  and  opinion-makers  will  all 
be  there  to  see  the  only  musical 
ever  to  rival  “White  Christmas.” 

Invitations  for  “Anything  Goes” 
screenings  are  in  the  mail  now. 

If  yours  doesn’t  reach  you  soon, 
call  your  Paramount  branch... 
for  this  is  an  industry  festival 
no  one  wants  to  miss.  Dazzling 
stars  — opulent  production  — 
marvelous  music  — make 
“Anything  Goes”  the  greatest 
attraction  theatres  have  ever  been 
offered  for  Easter  playing  time. 


BING  CROSBY  - DONALD  O’CONNOR 
JEANMAIRE  • MITZI  GAYNOR 
PHIL  HARRIS  in 
“ANYTHING  GOES” 

In  VistaV'ision  and  Color  by  Technicolor  . Music 
and  Lyrics  by  Cole  Porter  . Produced  by  Robert 
Emmett  Dolan  • Directed  by  Robert  Lewis  • Musical 
Numbers  Staged  by  Nick  Castle  • Jeanmaire  ballet  and 
“I  Get  A Kick  Out  of  You”  Staged  by  Roland  Petit 
Screen  Story  and  Screen  Play  by  Sidney  Sheldon 
From  the  Play  by  Guy  Bolton  and  P.  G.  Wodehouse 
(Revised  by  Howard  Lindsay  and  Russell  Crouse) 
New  Songs  by  Sammy  Cahn  and  James  V^an  Heusen 
A Paramount  Picture 


SENATE 

STARTS 

Small  Business  Group  to 
Hear  Exhibitor  Plaints 
Against  Distributors 

by  J.  A.  OTTEN 

irASHlXGTOX : A Senate  Small  Busi- 
ness subcommittee  headed  by  Senator  Hu- 
bert H.  Humphrey  (D.,  i\Iinn.)  announced 
it  would  start  hearing  exhibitor  complaints 
against  distributor  trade  practices  February 
2. 

It  made  it  clear  that  spokesmen  for  the 
distributors  and  Federal  Government  offi- 
cials would  testify  at  later  hearings. 

No  Issues  Pre-Judged 

Senator  John  Sparkman  (D.,  Ala.), 
chairman  of  the  full  Senate  Small  Business 
Committee,  said  the  hearings  would  try  to 
develop  the  extent  to  which  the  film  industry 
recommendations  made  by  another  Small 
Business  subcommittee  some  three  years  ago 
have  been  carried  out.  Senator  Humphrey 
said  he  hoped  the  hearings  would  be  able  to 
resolve  some  of  the  problems  between  ex- 
hibitors and  distributors,  and  emphasized 
that  the  subcommittee  has  not  pre-judged 
any  of  the  issues. 

The  hearings  originally  and  unofficially 
scheduled  for  January  25,  grow  out  of  com- 
plaints by  Allied  States  Association  officials 
against  the  distributors.  Allied  persuaded 
the  Small  Business  committee  to  provide  a 
forum  for  the  airing  of  these  complaints, 
and  other  exhibitor  organizations  indicated 
that  they,  too,  wanted  to  be  heard. 

-Allied  has  been  pushing  a proposal  for 
the  enactment  of  legislation  authorizing  Fed- 
eral regulation  of  the  film  industry ; how- 
ever, the  Small  Business  group  has  no  power 
to  report  legislation,  and  so  this  part  of 
.•\llied’s  drive  will  have  to  be  taken  later  to 
other  committees. 

Hearings  Three  Years  Ago 

Extensive  public  hearings  on  the  prob- 
lems of  independent  exhibitors  were  held 
almost  three  years  ago  by  a subcommittee 
headed  by  Senator  Andrew  F.  Schoeppel 
fR..  Kans.),  Mr.  Sparkman  noted.  “Upon 
completion  of  that  investigation,’’  he  said, 
“the  full  committee  issued  a report  setting 
forth  its  recommendations  for  improving  the 
competitive  position  of  the  nation’s  motion 
picture  exhibitors.  At  this  time,  as  exhibi- 
tors renew  their  complaints  against  certain 
industry  distribution  practices,  it  seems 
clearly  appropriate  to  determine  the  extent 
to  which  such  recommendations  of  the  com- 
mittee have  been  effectuated.” 

Mr.  Sparkman  said  that,  “accordingly, 
the  full  committee  has  agreed  to  grant  the 
request  of  the  exhibitors  for  an  opportunity 
to  present  their  problems  before  a public 


STERY 
FEB.  2 

forum.”  He  had  assigned  the  job  to  Mr. 
Humphrey’s  subcommittee  on  retailing  and 
distribution,  he  added. 

Mr.  Humphrey  declared,  “In  launching 
this  inquiry,  the  subcommittee  has  carefully 
avoided  any  prejudgment  of  any  of  the  issues 
to  be  raised  during  the  hearings.  Moreover, 
the  subcommittee  does  not  entertain  any  pre- 
conceived notion  of  the  ultimate  facts  to  be 
established  in  the  course  of  the  hearings. 
The  sole  purpose  of  the  undertaking  will  be 
to  try  to  resolve  problems  which  may  be 
shown  to  exist  between  distributors  and 
motion  picture  exhibitors,  most  of  whom  are 
small,  independent  businessmen,”  he  declared 
further. 

The  subcommittee’s  plans,  Mr.  Humphrey 
said,  call  for  testimony  from  all  parties  di- 
rectly interested  in  theatre  owners’  prob- 
lems. Among  the  witnesses  to  be  heard  at 
hearings  starting  February  2,  he  declared, 
will  be  representatives  of  the  various  thea- 
tre owner  associations  as  well  as  a number 
of  unaffiliated  exhibitors. 

Specific  names  will  be  made  public  later, 
he  said.  He  added  that  “in  subsequent  hear  - 
ings,  the  subcommittee  intends  to  receive 
testimony  from  spokesmen  for  the  motion 
picture  distributors  and  also  from  Federal 
Government  officials  having  anti-trust  re- 
sponsibilities in  the  motion  picture  industry.” 

Had  Urged  Arbitration 

Mr.  Sparkman’s  statement  that  one  pur- 
pose of  the  new  investigation  is  to  study 
the  extent  to  which  the  earlier  investiga- 
tion’s recommendations  have  been  carried 
out  was  particularly  interesting  in  view  of 
the  fact  that  the  earlier  subcommittee  rec- 
ommended, among  other  things,  the  estab- 
lishment of  an  industry  arbitration  system. 
It  also  said  that  film  rentals  didn’t  seem  a 
proper  subject  for  arbitration.  Allied  has 
been  insisting  that  any  arbitration  system 
must  include  arbitration  of  rentals,,  and  has 
abstained  from  the  pending  arbitration  sys- 
tem for  the  reason  that  it  does  not  cover 
such  rentals. 

Members  of  the  subcommittee  holding  the 
hearings  next  month,  in  addition  to  Mr. 
Humphrey,  are  Senators  John  F.  Kennedy 
(D.,  Mass.),  Wayne  Morse  (D.,  Ore.). 
Schoeppel,  and  Barry  Goldwater  (R.,  Ariz.). 

RKO  Billings  Contest 
Winners  Announced 

Winners  of  RKO’s  annual  billings  contest 
for  all  exchanges  in  the  United  States  and 
Canada,  which  ran  from  August  12  to  De- 
cember 1,  were  announced  last  week  by 
Walter  Branson,  vice-president  in  charge 
of  distribution.  The  exchanges  were  split 
into  three  groups  according  to  their  booking 
potential.  Sol  Sachs,  Dallas  manager,  won 
top  honors  in  Group  I,  followed  by  Joseph 


Brecheen,  Washington,  and  Meyer  Mackim- 
son,  Toronto.  Top  honors  in  Group  II 
went  to  Harry  Cohen,  Montreal ; L.  E. 
Hobson,  Denver,  and  Lloyd  Krause,  Cincin- 
nati. Leading  exchange  managers  of  Group 
HI  were  Harry  Payntef,  Calgary;  Ken 
Snelgrove,  St.  John,  and  Norman  Nielsen, 
Omaha.  Prizes  were  awarded  also  to  dis- 
trict managers  for  the  best  over-all  per- 
formance of  the  branches  under  their  super- 
vision, Mr.  Branson  said.  Winners  of  this 
award,  in  the  order  of  branch  performance, 
were  Jack  Labow,  Canadian  district;  A1 
Kolitz,  Rocky  Mountain  district,  and  Dave 
Prince,  Southeastern  district. 


3MG3M  Big  an 
3Music  Miatt 
1933  Screen 

MGM  pictures  during  1955  not  only  oc- 
cupied the  Radio  City  Music  Hall  screen 
most  of  the  time,  they  grossed  $5,475,000, 
Russell  Downing,  president  of  the  theatre, 
said  in  New  York  early  this  week.  The 
Hall  played  11  pictures.  Nine  were  from 
MGM. 

The  longest  run  and  biggest  grosser, 
however,  was  from  Warners.  It  is  “Mr. 
Roberts.”  It  played  nine  weeks  and  col- 
lected $1,360,000. 

Mr  Downing  stressed  his  theatre  is  inde- 
pendent and  that  MGM  pictures  predom- 
inated because  they  best  met  the  Hall’s 
standards.  He  added  he  would  continue  to 
review  the  offerings  of  all  companies. 

The  program  set  thus  far  is  “I’ll  Cry 
Tomorrow”  (MGM);  “Picnic”  and  “The 
Eddie  Duchin  Story”  (Columbia)  ; and 
“Serenade”  (Warners). 

The  house  receipts  declined  six  to  seven 
per  cent  last  year,  he  said.  The  1956  busi- 
ness should  be  as  good  because  of  the  prod- 
uct he  has  seen  and  expects,  he  said. 

On  admission  prices,  Mr.  Downing  was 
steady.  The  operation  plans  to  “hold  the 
line”  despite  increased  co.'^ts,  he  promised 
He  also  had  this  to  commeni: 

“Good  pictures”  of  yesteryear  these  days 
aren’t  enough.  The  Hall  needs  “great 
pictures.” 

"Anything  Goes"  to  Have  32 
Invitational  Previews 

Exhibitors,  film  buyers,  press  representa- 
tives, columnists  and  radio-television  com- 
mentators will  gather  at  theatres  in  32  ex- 
change cities  for  simultaneous  invitational 
previews  of  Paramount’s  “Anything  Goes” 
January  13,  according  to  the  company.  The 
preview  in  New  York  will  take  place  at 
Loew’s  72nd  Street  theatre  and  Paramount 
has  contracted  to  take  over  the  entire  thea- 
tre, as  well  as  a selected  theatre  in  each 
of  the  other  branch  cities  for  the  special 
showings.  The  picture,  which  stars  Bing 
Croshy,  Donald  O’Connor,  Jeanmaire  and 
Mitzi  Gaynor.  was  produced  in  \’’istaVision 
and  Color  by  Technicolor. 


16 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


RAMS  AYE  FINALLY  VINDICATED 
ON  LEGEND  OF  FRIESE  GREENE 


Cownmunian 
BreakftMst 
JftMMtuary  29 

Catholics  of  the  film  industry  in  the  New 
York  area  will  hold  their  sixth  annual  cor- 
porate Communion  and  Breakfast  Sunday 
morning,  January  29.  Mass  will  be  cele- 
brated at  St.  Patrick’s  Cathedral  at  9 A.M. 
and  breakfast  will  follow  in  the  Grand  Ball- 
room of  the  Waldorf  Astoria  Hotel. 

The  sponsoring  committee,  representing 
all  major  production,  distribution  and  ex- 
hibition companies  in  the  New  York  area, 
are  now  planning  the  program  and  the 
names  of  the  principal  speakers  and  star 
who  will  appear  at  the  breakfast  will  be 
announced  soon. 

As  in  previous  years,  tickets  will  be  dis- 
tributed by  committee  representatives  in 
each  company. 

The  Communion  Breakfast  idea  for  mo- 
tion picture  people  was  started  in  New 
York  six  years  ago  and  has  now  spread  to 
Hollywood,  Canada  and  other  cities. 

The  sponsoring  committee  for  the  New 
York  area  includes : 

Frank  J.  Alford,  M.P.E.A. ; John  W.  Ali- 
coate.  Film  Daily;  Joseph  F.  Arnold,  Pathe 
Laboratories,  Inc.;  William  E.  Barry,  Shea 
Enterprises,  Inc. ; Marguerite  Bourdette,  Para- 
mount ; Frank  Bryan,  Skouras  Theatres  Corp. ; 
Frank  E.  Cahill,  Jr.,  Warner  Bros.  Pictures; 
Francis  X.  Carroll,  20th  Century-Fox;  Patrick 
Casey,  Casey  Enterprises,  Inc. ; John  Confort, 
Jr.,  Confort  and  Co.;  Robert  W.  Coyne, 
COMPO;  Thomas  Crehan,  RKO  Theatres; 
John  Dervin,  Allied  Artists;  Albert  A.  Duryea, 
Consolidated  Film  Industries ; Joseph  Eagan, 
Fabian  Theatres  Corp. 

.\lso  James  M.  Franey,  United  World  Films; 
Joseph  M.  Geoghan,  Century  Theatres;  Ed- 
mund C.  Grainger,  Republic  Pictures;  Agnes 
Mengel  Grew,  Paramount  Pictures ; William 
J.  Heineman,  United  Artists  Corp.;  Walter  F. 
J.  Higgins,  Associated  Prudential  Theatres; 
.Alexander  E.  Horwath,  Stanley  Warner  Corp. ; 
John  Hughes,  United  Artists;  James  David 
Ivers,  Quigley  Publishing  Co.;  James  J,  Jor- 
dan, Universal  Pictures;  John  Kane,  Colum- 
bia Pictures;  Mrs.  James  F.  Looram,  Int.  Fed- 
eration Catholic  Alumnae. 

Also  Fred  L.  Lynch,  Radio  City  Music  Hall ; 
Thomas  J.  Martin,  Warner  Bros.  Pictures ; 
Joseph  A.  McConville,  Columbia  Pictures  Int. 
Corp.;  Joseph  McMahon,  Republic  Pictures; 
Paul  C.  Mooney,  Sr.,  National  Screen  Service 
Corp. ; Peter  J.  Mooney,  Audio  Productions, 
Inc. ; James  A.  Mulvey,  Samuel  Goldwyn  Pro- 
ductions; John  F.  Murphy,  Loew’s ; Thomas 
Murtha,  I.A.T.S.E.  Local  No.  4;  L.  Douglas 
Ketter,  Jr.,  Todd-AO;  Paul  D.  O’Brien, 
O^Brien,  Driscoll  & Raftery ; Robert  H. 
O’Brien,  American  Broadcasting-Paramount 
Theatres;  John  J.  O’Connor,  Universal  Pic- 
tures. 

-Also  Thomas  F.  O’Connor,  RKO  Theatres ; 
Daniel  T.  O’Shea,  RKO  Radio  Pictures;  Ed- 
ward K.  O’Shea,  Paramount  Film  Distributing; 
Martin  Quigley,  Quigley  Publishing  Co. ; Ed- 
ward C.  Raftery,  O’Brien,  Driscoll  & Raftery; 
Charles  M.  Reagan,  MGM  Pictures ; Thomas 

E.  Rodgers,  Trans-Lux  Theatre  Corp. ; William 

F.  Rodgers,  Jr.,  M.P.E.A.;  George  J.  Schaefer, 
1600  Broadway,  N.  Y. ; Spyros  S.  Skouras, 
Skouras  Theatres;  Nick  Tronolone,  1775 
Broadway;  Frank  C.  Walker,  Comerford  Thea- 
tres; Eugene  Walsh,  Universal  Pictures; 
Richard  F.  Walsh,  I.A.T.S.E. ; William  A. 
White,  Skouras  Theatres,  and  Monsignor 
Thomas  F.  Little,  spiritual  director. 


Of  the  many  facets  of  film  history  Terry 
Ramsaye  wrote  about  during  his  fruitful 
career  in  journalism,  including  17  years  as 
editor  of  The  HERALD,  one  for  which  he 
was  sharply  criticised  on  both  sides  of  the 
Atlantic  was  his  view  on  William  Friese 
Greene.  British  film  historians  (and  some  in 
America)  for  decades  have  been  hailing 
Friese  Greene  as  the  father  of  the  motion 
picture.  Terry  Ramsaye  strongly  dissented. 

Now,  more  than  a year  after  Mr.  Ram- 
saye's  death,  there  is  a kind  of  poetic 
justice.  W.  H.  Coe  has  written  in  the 
authoritative  British  Journal  of  Photography 
a definitive  article,  "The  Truth  About 
Friese  Greene."  Mr.  Coe's  views,  as  sum- 
marized in  Image,  publication  of  the 
George  Eastman  House,  coincide  precisely 
with  Mr.  Ramsaye's. 

Mr.  Coe,  as  Martin  Quigley,  Jr.,  did  in 
his  "Magic  Shadows — the  Story  of  the 
Crigin  of  Motion  Pictures,"  went  to  the 
contemporary  publications  to  find  out 
what  Friese  Greene  actually  contributed. 
While  the  same  facts  are  set  down  in  both 
"Magic  Shadows"  and  in  Mr.  Coe's  article, 
in  the  former  book  the  reader  is  allowed  to 
reach  his  own  conclusions.  The  facts  make 


RKO  Theatres  Advertise 
Starting  Time  of  Shows 

RKO  Theatres  began  this  week  to  include 
in  all  New  York  advertising  the  starting 
time  of  every  performance  in  its  New  York 
circuit  houses.  In  addition,  on  weekday 
nights  show  schedules  will  be  arranged  to 
start  the  final  performance  at  approximately 
9:30  P.M.,  in  order  to  let  patrons  out  of  the 
theatres  not  much  later  than  11 :30  P.M.  On 
weekends,  the  customary  late  shows  will  be 
continued.  The  changes,  according  to  Harry 
Mandel,  RKO  Theatres  advertising-publicity 
director,  are  designed  to  meet  frequently- 
heard  complaints  of  difficulty  encountered  in 
determining  the  starting  time  of  shows  and 
of  the  late  hour  at  which  some  performances 
end  on  weekday  nights.  The  new  policy  will 
continue  for  an  indefinite  period  and  prob- 
ably will  be  extended  to  out-of-town  thea- 
tres subsequently,  according  to  the  state- 
ment made  by  Mr.  Mandel. 

Winikus  of  UA  to  Europe 

Francis  Winikus,  executive  assistant  to 
Max  Youngstein,  vice-president  of  United 
Artists,  will  move  to  Paris  in  the  Spring 
on  what  is  expected  will  be  a permanent 
assignment.  Mr.  Winikus  will  be  active  in 
all  phases  of  publicity,  possibly  concentrat- 
ing on  personalities.  Ben  Halpern,  recently 
named  to  a top  publicity-advertising-exploi- 
tation post  for  UA  in  Europe,  will  devote 
most  of  his  time  to  exploitation  for  the 
foreign  department. 


clear  that  while  many  contributed  impor- 
tantly to  the  development  of  the  motion 
picture,  Friese  Greene  was  not  in  that 
number. 

In  The  HERALD  in  April,  1951,  Mr. 
Ramsaye  criticised  the  making  with  British 
Government  money  of  a feature  film  glori- 
fying Friese  Greene  as  the  father  of  the 
motion  picture.  The  production  of  "The 
Magic  Box"  was  attacked  as  a "perversion 
of  history"  and  "injustice  to  the  very 
genuine  contributions  of  eminent  British 
scientists  and  other  persons".  In  June  of 
that  year  the  producers  of  the  film.  Sir 
Michael  Balcon,  John  Boulting  and  Ronald 
Neame,  charged  Mr.  Ramsaye  with  a dis- 
play of  temper,  asserting  a pathological 
prejudice  against  Friese  Greene  on  Mr. 
Ramsaye's  part.  At  that  time  the  essential 
historical  details,  now  again  verified  by  a 
British  historian,  were  set  down  in  "Magic 
Shadows"  to  put  the  record  straight. 

Mr.  Ramsaye  had  the  facts  on  Friese 
Greene  long  before  he  wrote.  That  was 
the  way  Mr.  Ramsaye  operated.  Those  who 
don't  want  to  accept  Mr.  Ramsaye  on  this 
point  of  motion  picture  history  now  have 
nowhere  to  turn. 

CieartBnce 
Ms  Mfphetd 

MINNEAPOLIS-.  Holding  that  “there  is 
convincing  evidence  that  an  extensive  or 
move-over  run  builds  a picture  and  the  sub- 
urban theatres  are  aided  in  their  box-office 
gross  rather  than  injured,”  Federal  Judge 
Gunnard  H.  Nordbye  upheld  the  existing 
28-day  clearance  pattern  last  week  and  de- 
nied to  William  and  Sidney  Volk,  operators 
of  the  deluxe  suburban  Terrace  theatre,  a 
special  “move-over”  status. 

The  judge’s  decision,  handed  down  almost 
a year  to  the  day  after  conclusion  of  the 
lengthy  trial,  also  held  that  there  “is  no 
interference  of  conspiracy”  on  the  part  of  the 
eight  major  film  distributors  and  RKO 
Theatres  and  Minnesota  Amusement  Com- 
pany in  restricting  extended  first  run  films 
in  the  Minneapolis  area,  thereby  eliminating 
the  Volk  Brothers’  request  for  almost 
$1,000,000  damages  under  the  triple  dam- 
ages provision  of  the  Federal  anti-trust  law. 

Judge  Nordbye,  in  a 17-page  memoran- 
dum decision,  held  that  “no  exhibitor  has 
absolute  right  to  compel  a distributor  to 
grant  it  an  earlier  run.”  The  Volks  con- 
tended that  the  construction  costs,  location 
appointments  and  the  type  of  deluxe  opera- 
tions at  their  theatre  entitled  the  house  to 
special  consideration  in  the  form  of  a special 
clearance  equal  to  that  of  the  downtown 
move-over  houses. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  7.  1956 


17 


THE  UNEXPECTED 
FROM  HITCHCOCKS 


starTing  - 

EJ^MUNID  GWENN 
JOHN  rORSYTHE 

and  in t r ocin ^ i ng 

MacLAIA-Ji. 

Ihrected  hv  Al.KHEl'*  lllTCHCOClC 

ScreetipUv  V v )( 1HN  MICHAEL  HAYE$ 
Bash’d  on  tho  No'^d  by  JACK  TBKVC’iR  SlOBY 


UNEXPECTED  ROMANCE 

. as  a young  widow  with  a yen 
meets  a very  yummy  guy! 


The  man  who  thrilled  you  vvlth  * 
“To  Catch  A Thief  “ and  “Rear  Window’* 
comes  through  with  his  * 
most  unusual  story  yet! 


HITCHCOCK’S  NEW 
SUSPENSE  HIT 
HEADS  FOR  THE  BIG 
BOXOFFICE  MONEY! 


NINE  WEEKS  IN 
NEW  YORK  PACES 
FIRST  OUT-OF- 
TOWN  DATES  NOW! 


NATIONAL  RELEASE  IN 
JANUARY  CLIMAXES 
TOP-POWERED 
PRESELLING! 


“Drama  the  Hitchcock  fans  will  love.  The  suspense  is 
there  and  laughter.”  —Boxoffice 

“Couldn’t  be  funnier— cheerfully  amoral.” 

— Washington  Evening  Sun 

“Brilliant  Hitchcock  offering.  The  witty  screenplay 
has  many  unusual  twists.”  —Film  Daily 

“Bound  to  create  word-of-mouth  and  thus  pay  off  well 
at  the  boxoffice.”  —Showmen's  Trade  Rewiew 


“PARAMOUNT’S  THE  TROUBLE  WITH  HARRY’  RANKS 
AMONG  THE  FUNNIEST  PICTURES  OF  THE  YEAR!  ” 


^ —New  York  World -Telegram  & Sun 

• “Superbly  directed  and  acted.  Shirley  MacLaine  should 

become  a big  star.”  —The  Independent 

“Glorious  shots  of  breath-taking  Vermont  foliage 
should  put  Photographer  Robert  Burks  up  for 
Academy  consideration.”  —Hollywood  Reporter 


“Easily  one  of  the  most  enjoyable  pictures  the  thrill 
master  has  delivered.”  —Boxoffice  Digest 

“A  delightful  spoof.  Witty  ‘business’,  piquant  and  risque 

dialogue  and  the  best  Vista  Vision -Technicolor  yet.” 

— Film  Bulletin 

“Vermont  in  autumn,  done  in  Technicolor,  gives  the 
ticket-buyer  an  edge  for  his  money.  Edmund  Gwenn 
a delight.”  —Variety 


SEVEN  BRITISH 
AMONG  TOP  12 


Herald  Survey  in  Britain 
Shows  *Dam  Busters’  in 
'55  Lead;  5 U,S,  Films 

by  PETER  BURNUP 

LONDON : The  year’s  end  box  office  sur- 
vey by  The  HERALD’s  London  Bureau 
in  connection  with  the  star  poll  disclosed 
that  out  of  1955’s  twelve  top  money-making 
pictures  no  fewer  than  seven  were  British 
productions. 

The  Money-Makers  Listed 

These,  in  their  order  of  precedence,  are 
the  money-makers; 

The  Dam  Busters  (British) 

White  Christmas 
Doctor  at  Sea  (British) 

The  Colditz  Story  (British) 

Seven  Brides  for  Seven  Brothers 
Above  Us  the  Waves  (British) 

One  Good  Turn  (British) 

Raising  a Riot  (British) 

A Kid  for  Two  Farthings  (British) 
Student  Prince 
20,000  Leagues  Under  the  Sea 
Not  As  a Stranger 

Announcement  of  the  survey  made  it  clear 
that  a number  of  most  notable  20th-Fox 
CinemaScope  pictures  had  not  been  accorded 
bookings  around  the  major  circuits  but 
nevertheless  rated  vast  public  approval. 
Listed  among  them  were  : 

There’s  No  Business  Like  Show  Busi- 
ness 

The  Seven  Year  Itch 
Daddy  Long  Legs 

Made  News  Headlines 

Disclosure  of  the  results  of  the  star  poll, 
which  named  Dirk  Bogarde  as  this  country’s 
biggest  box  office  money-maker  and,  in  par- 
ticular, the  success  of  British-made  pictures, 
made  headline  stories  in  every  newspaper  in 
the  land  from  the  snow-girt  Highlands  of 
Scotland  to  remote  Penzance  in  Cornwall. 
The  lofty  Times  accorded  the  announcement 
distinguished  prominence.  The  authoritative 
Manchester  Guardian  commented:  “This  is 
certainly  remarkable’’.  Tabloids  like  the 
Daily  Mirror  and  the  Daily  Sketch  devoted 
the  whole  of  their  front  pages  to  pictures  of 
Mr.  Bogarde  with  streamer  headlines  run- 
ning “Britain’s  Box  Office  Triumph’’. 

Film  executives,  British  and  American 
alike,  said  that  your  London  Bureau  had  set 
a new  pattern  in  propaganda.  With  the  aid 
of  news  rooms  and  the  BBC’s  television  net- 
work the  whole  country  was  “talking  motion 
pictures’’  on  the  day  of  the  announcement. 
“It  was  a superb  combined  operation”,  said 
the  dozen  of  American  film  men  here. 

In  the  roseate  glow  of  motion  picture  en- 
thusiasm, the  Times,  for  no  currently  ob- 


vious reason,  thought  it  proper  the  next 
morning  to  devote  a 1,000-word  editorial 
to  the  film  business,  activated  obviously  by 
John  Davis’  recently  reported  declaration 
that  the  industry  should  get  together  and 
take  care  of  its  own  afifairs. 

Refers  to  State  Aid 

The  Times  referred  to  the  several  ways 
in  which  the  state  assists  the  British  film 
producing  industry  and  to  the  circumstance 
that  all  these  forms  of  help  fall  to  be  recon- 
sidered before  the  autumn  of  1958;  adding 
that  the  president  of  the  Board  of  Trade  had 
in  mind  an  enquiry  into  the  whole  question 
of  state  aid  to  the  country’s  film  production 
industry. 

“Mr.  Davis”,  the  article  went  on,  “quickly 
deprecated  this.  Such  enquiries  do  no  good 
and  may  do  much  harm,  he  argued;  they 
make  the  public  think  the  industry  is  always 
in  difficulties ; the  industry  should  be  asked 
to  undertake  the  enquiry  itself”. 

Following  a review  of  previous  enquiries 
into  the  industry,  the  newspaper  caustically 
added : 

“The  arguments  are  familiar — which  may 
be  a good  reason  against  holding  a new 
independent  review  of  the  kind  Mr.  Davis 
thinks  damaging,  unless  such  an  inquiry 
would  add  substantially  to  knowledge  of  the 
facts,  especially  about  the  financial  structure 
of  the  industry.  What,  for  example,  deter- 
mines the  way  in  which  returns  are  divided 
between  exhibition,  distribution  and  produc- 
tion in  the  integrated  concerns  ? 

“Air  of  Affluence” 

“This  chronically  losing  industry  has  al- 
ways worn  a surprising  air  of  affluence. 
But  would  any  inquiry  make  much  headway 
in  this  direction  ? There  is  probably  little 
new  which  a review  could  discover  about 
the  ways  in  which,  for  example,  distribution 
methods  could  be  changed  in  order  to  try  to 
net  higher  earnings  for  films;  or  about  the 
ways  in  which  production  costs  can  be  re- 
duced. 

“Past  inquiries  have  been  fairly  searching. 
There  are  new  factors — television  has  had, 
and  is  still  having,  its  effect,  and  the  cinema 
had  introduced  new  techniques,  partly,  it 
may  be,  as  a response.  Fvidence  on  the 
effect  of  these  innovations,  outside  and  in- 
side the  industry,  mu.st  largely  come  from 
the  industry.  But  they  would  hardly  in 
themselves  justify  a new  inquiry. 

“The  starting  point  in  Government  policy- 
making must  surely  be  the  judgment  whether 
for  aesthetic,  social,  trade,  or  political  rea- 
sons it  will  be  essential  in  future  conditions 
to  have  a large  British  film  producing  in- 
dustry. This  is  not  a question  that  can  be 
left  to  the  industry  itself.  It  is  not  so  easy 
a matter  to  decide  as  to  the  practical  ways 
in  which  the  industry  might  be  helped.  But 


until  it  has  been  decided  no  one  can  really 
say  what  help,  if  any,  should  be  given.” 

The  Times  editor — Sir  William  Haley — is 
a much  respected  journalist  but  given  from 
time  to  time  to  slightly  embittered  hectoring 
of  the  Government  of  the  day.  Sir  William, 
after  a successful  career  in  authoritative 
provincial  newspapers,  became  the  BBC’s 
director-general,  but  resigned  from  that 
office  in  protest  when  the  Churchill  Govern- 
ment elected  to  authorise  commercial  tele- 
vision. 

His  lecturing  of  the  Government  since 
then  has  not  been  conspicuously  successful 
or,  for  that  matter,  the  successive  tilts  he  has 
tried  with  other  powerful  interests.  His 
latest  shaft  at  John  Davis  and  through  him 
at  the  whole  film  production  business  here, 
has  put  several  cats  among  the  pigeons. 

Mr.  Davis,  so  far,  has  evinced  no  outward 
reaction  to  Sir  William’s  attack.  But  the 
battle  clearly  is  on.  Whatever  Sir  William 
Haley  may  say,  unless  the  Fady  Plan  and 
the  National  Film  Finance  Corporation  are 
continued,  British  studios  may  just  as  well 
close  down. 

A bonnie  fight  clearly  is  impending. 

KORDA  TV  FILMS 

Sir  Alexander  Korda  is  to  commence  pro- 
duction for  television  early  in  1956.  Dis- 
tribution has  already  been  obtained  in  the 
U.S.,  it  is  stated. 

In  a press  announcement  Sir  Alexander 
says  that  London  Film  (Television  Serv- 
ices), Ltd.,  will  start  early  in  January  on 
a series  of  TV  films,  in  black  and  white, 
based  on  famous  trials.  It  is  intended  to 
shoot  one  film  a week.  There  will  be  two 
series:  “Famous  Trials”  and  “The  Lord 
Chief  Justice”. 

The  subjects  will  concern  the  most  famous 
dramatic  trials  brought  before  Britain’s 
court’s.  Casting,  it  is  added,  will  be  an- 
nounced shortly,  but  the  role  of  the  Lord 
Chief  Justice  will  be  offered  to  Sir  Ralph 
Richardson. 

Hake  Sees  Australia 
Continuing  Ceiling 

Indications  are  that  the  Australian  Gov- 
ernment will  continue  in  1956  its  $5,800,000 
ceiling  on  the  amount  of  money  which 
American  film  companies  can  remit,  Clay 
Hake,  managing  director  for  Paramount  in 
charge  of  Australia  and  New  Zealand,  said 
last  week  in  New  York.  Australian  film 
business  in  1955  had  a record  year,  accord- 
ing to  Mr.  Hake,  who  credited  the  rise  to 
better  quality  pictures,  the  strong  economic 
situation  there  and  other  favorable  factors. 
American  pictures,  he  added,  continue  to 
dominate  Australian  screens.  Regarding  tele- 
vision in  Australia,  he  felt  it  would  not  have 
the  “terrific  impact”  it  had  in  the  U.S.  when 
it  makes  its  debut  next  September  or  Octo- 
ber. He  said  it  will  be  confined  to  Sydney 
and  Melbourne  initially,  that  sets  probably 
will  cost  twice  as  much  as  in  America  and 
that  television  there  will  have  to  depend  on 
local  talent  and  programming  because  it  is 
prohibited  by  the  Government  bank  from 
buying  programming  abroad.  He  added  that 
Australia  has  no  film  production  branch  to 
draw  upon  for  talent  and  programming. 


20 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


20th~Fox  Boosts 
Product  Budget  in 

Number  and  Cost 


AN  expanded  production  program,  which 
will  see  34  pictures  produced  or  released 
in  1956  at  an  estimated  cost  in  excess  of 
$70,000,000,  was  anounced  this  week  by 
Darryl  F.  Zanuck.  vice-president  in  charge 
of  producton  at  20th  Century-Fox,  as  a re- 
sult of  conferences  with  Spyros  P.  Skouras, 
president,  during  the  latter’s  recent  visit 
to  the  company’s  studios  in  Hollywood. 

Included  in  the  list  of  major  properties 
are  two  of  Rodgers  and  Hammerstein’s  suc- 

Ee/ow.  Clifton  Webb  and  Josephine  Griffin  in 
the  British  spy  story,  "The  Man  Who  Never 
Was." 


cessful  musicals,  nine  Broadway  stage  hits 
and  14  best-selling  novels.  All  pctures  will 
be  produced  in  35mm  or  the  new  55mm 
CinemaScope.  The  two  pictures  launching 
CinemaScope  55  are  Rodgers  and  Hammer- 
stein’s “Carousel,”  already  completed,  and 
“The  King  and  I,”  currently  filming.  Mr. 
Zanuck  also  announced  the  company  will 
produce  two  pictures  a year  in  the  new 
process. 

Mr.  Zanuck’s  personal  productions  for  the 
year  include  “The  Man  in  the  Gray  Flan- 
nel Suit,”  best-seller  currently  shooting, 
written  and  directed  by  Nunnally  Johnson, 
and  starring  Gregory  Peck,  Jennifer  Jones 
and  Fredric  March.  It  is  the  company’s 
Easter  release.  Also  on  his  schedule  is  the 
new  novel,  “Island  in  the  Sun”  by  Alec 
Waugh. 

Buddy  Adler’s  quantitative  schedule  in- 
cludes “The  Lieutenant  Wore  skirts,”  star- 
ing Tom  Ewell  and  Sheree  North,  and 
“The  Bottom  of  the  Bottle,”  starring  Van 
Johnson,  Joseph  Gotten,  Ruth  Roman  and 
Jack  Carson,  both  January  releases.  Now 
in  production  in  Hawaii  is  “The  Revolt  of 
iSIamie  Stover”  with  Raoul  Walsh  direct- 
ing Jane  Russell  and  Richard  Egan,  to  be 
released  in  April. 

Others  on  the  busy  producer’s  agenda  in 
the  coming  months  include  such  stage  plays 
as  “Bus  Stop.”  to  be  directed  by  Josh  Lo- 
gon; “A  Hatful  of  Rain,”  and  “Anastasia,” 
to  be  directed  by  Anatole  Litvak  and  star- 
ring Ingrid  Bergman.  Novels  to  be  made 
include  “The  Day  the  Century  Ended,”  star- 
ring Robert  Wagner  and  Cameron  Mitchell, 
“Solo”  and  a Buddy  Adler-Eugene  Erenke 
production,  “Heaven  Knows,  Mr.  Allison,” 
starring  Deborah  Kerr. 


Above.  "The  King  and  I,"  coining  soon  in 
CinemaScope  55,  will  be  the  second  Rodgers 
and  Hammerstein  musical  from  the  20th-Fox 
lot. 

Below.  Gregory  Peck  and  Jennifer  Jones  add 
sophisticatian  to  "The  Man  in  the  Grey  Flan- 
nel Suit." 


Other  producers  and  their  assignments 
are : 

Samuel  G.  Engel : “Bernardine,”  stage 
play  by  Mary  Chase ; “A  Roomful  of 
Roses,”  stage  play  by  Edith  Somner  Sod- 
erberg,  and  “Boy  on  a Dolphin,”  novel  to 
be  directed  by  Jean  Negulesco. 

Nunnally  Johnson:  “Do  Re  Mi,”  by  Gar- 
son  Kanin,  and  “Oh  Men,  Oh  Women,”  play 
by  Edward  Chodorov,  with  screenplay  and 
direction  on  both  by  Mr.  Johnson. 

Charles  Brackett:  “The  Sixth  of  June,” 
novel  by  Lionel  Shapiro,  starring  Robert 
Taylor,  Richard  Todd,  Dana  Wynter  and 
Edmond  O'Brien;  “The  Desk  Set,”  play  by 
William  Marchant,  and  “The  Wayward 
Bus,”  novel  by  John  Steinbeck. 

Henry  Ephron : “23  Paces  to  Baker 
Street,”  novel  by  Philip  MacDonald,  star- 
ring Van  Johnson,  now  in  production  in 
England  and  slated  for  April  release;  Cole 

(Continued  on  jolloiving  page,  column  2) 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  7.  1956 


21 


CINEMASCOPE  55 
GETS  BIG  PCSH 


Below.  "Carousel,"  with  Robert  Rounse- 
ville,  Shirley  Jones,  Gordon  MacRoe, 
Barbara  Ruick  and  Cameron  Mitchell, 
appearing  here  in  that  order,  will 
launch  the  new  CinemaScope  55  with  a 
giant  campaign  heralding  the  process 
and  the  picture. 


AX  advertising,  publicity  and  exploitation 
campaign  surpassing  that  introducing  "The 
Robe”  and  CinemaScope  has  been  started 
by  20tb  Century-Fox  for  pre-selling  the 
Rodgers  and  Hammerstein’s  famous  musical 
"Carousel,”  the  initial  picture  filmed  in  the 
new  CinemaScope  55  process,  according  to 
the  company. 

To  launch  the  $5,000,000  production, 
which  stars  Gordon  iMacRae,  Shirley  Jones, 
Barbara  Roick  and  Cameron  Mitchell,  the 
company  has  set  a campaign  encompassing 
all  media  including  television,  radio,  news- 
reels, newspapers  and  syndicated  wire  serv- 
ices. The  new  CinemaScope  system  is  said 
to  be  tailored  for  theatres  of  every  type  and 
size. 

To  introduce  the  picture  and  the  process,  a 
series  of  special  showings  of  scenes  from 
"Carousel”  will  be  inaugurated  January  23 
in  principal  cities  and  trading  areas  of  the 
United  States  and  Canada.  The  demonstra- 
tions are  scheduled  through  February  21 
and  approximately  200,000  people  including 
producers,  exhibitors,  editors  and  represen- 
tatives of  the  lay  and  trade  press,  television 
and  radio  executives,  educational  figures, 
stock  market  analysts,  civic,  social  and 
women’s  club  leaders  and  important  figures 
in  all  walks  of  life,  are  expected  to  witness 
the  showings. 

.Magazine  Campaign 

One  phase  of  the  promotional  effort  is  a 
national  magazine  advertising  campaign 
budgeted  at  several  hundred  thousand  dol- 
lars. The  campaign  will  have  full-page 
color  adverti.sements  featured  in  more  than 
25  top  circulation  consumer  magazines,  fan 
magazines  and  Sunday  supplements  during 
the  four-week  period  beginning  the  first 
week  of  February. 

An  important  phase  of  the  campaign  will 
be  the  release  of  a special  sound-track  al- 
bum issued  by  Capitol  Records  in  January 
containing  the  score  of  the  film.  A full- 
scale  national  and  point-of-sale  campaign 
will  be  given  by  Capitol  Records  to  sell  the 
album  in  association  with  theatre  playdates. 
Release  of  the  album  will  be  announced  in 
musical  trade  publications,  consumer  news- 
paper ad  insertions  and  mailings  to  disc 
jockeys  and  juke  box  operators  across  the 
country.  Record  and  department  stores  will 
receive  special  promotional  material  includ- 
ing accessories  for  counter,  window  anl  wall 
displays. 

The  widest  possible  coverage  by  all  com- 
munications media  is  planned.  Point-of-sale 
advertising  and  publicity  will  be  stressed 
both  on  national  and  local  levels,  coinciding 
with  openings,  with  special  events  scheduled 
wherever  possible. 

“Carousel”  will  have  its  world  premiere 
at  the  Roxy  theatre.  New  York,  February 
16.  It  will  be  attended  by  celebrities  from 
all  areas  of  the  entertainment  world  as  well 


as  civic,  social  and  political  leaders.  The 
showing  will  be  held  for  the  benefit  of  the 
New  York  Medical  College.  The  picture 
was  produced  by  Henry  Ephron  and 
directed  by  Henry  King. 

The  exhibitor  and  press  demonstrations  of 
CinemaScope  55  will  be  held  in  59  major 
cities.  The  January  demonstrations  will 
take  place  in  New  York,  Los  Angeles,  Chi- 
cago, Boston,  .Sail  Francisco,  Indianapolis, 
Philadelphia;  J’ortland,  Ore.;  Cincinnati, 
Washington,  Seattle,  Detroit,  Charlotte, 
Spokane,  Cleveland,  Atlanta;  Missoula, 
Mont. ; Pittsburgh,  Jacksonville,  Salt  Lake 
City  and  Buffalo. 

February  demonstrations  will  be  in 
Miami,  Denver,  Toronto,  New  Orleans, 
Oimiha,  Rochester,  Memphis,  Des  Moines, 
Syracuse,  Houston,  Minneapolis,  Albany, 
Dallas,  Milwaukee,  New  Haven,  Oklahoma 
City,  Wilkes  Barre,  Kansas  City,  Knoxville, 
Harrisburg,  St.  Louis,  Chattanooga,  Balti- 
more; Springfield,  111.;  Little  Rock,  Rich- 
mond, Ft.  Wayne,  Shreveport,  Roanoke, 
Grand  Rapids,  Birmingham ; Charleston, 
W.  Va. ; Columbus,  Wichita,  Lexington. 
Louisville,  Albuquerque  and  Pboenix. 

INCREASE  PRODUCT 

(Continued  jrovi  preceding  page) 

Porter’s  “Can  Can,”  and  “The  Best  Things 
in  Life  Are  Free,”  original  story  by  John 
OHara. 

Herbert  Bayard  Swope,  Jr.:  “Hilda 

Crane,”  play  by  Samson  Raphaelson,  with 
screenplay  and  direction  by  Phillip  Dunne, 


starring  Jean  Simmons,  Guy  Madison  and 
Jean  Pierre  Aumont. 

James  Mason : “Jane  Eyre,”  by  Charlotte 
Bronte;  "High  Wind  in  Jamaica,”  play  by 
Paul  Osborn,  and  “Ten  Feet  Tall,”  written 
by  Berton  Roueche. 

Robert  L.  Jacks:  “The  Proud  Ones,” 
novel  by  Verne  Athanas,  starring  Robert 
Ryan,  Virginia  Mayo  and  Robert  Stack,  and 
“The  Circle,”  written  by  Carl  Leo  Gass. 

William  Bloom:  "On  the  Threshold  of 
Space,”  starring  John  Hodiak,  Guy  Madi- 
son, Virginia  Leith  and  Dean  Jagger,  to  be 
released  in  March. 

Williams  Hawks:  “The  Last  Wagon,”' 
original  story  by  Gwen  Bagni  Gielgud. 

Andre  Hakim : “The  Man  Who  Never 
Was,”  novel  by  Ewen  S.  B.  Montagu,  star- 
ring Clifton  Webb  and  Gloria  Grahame,  to 
be  released  in  February. 

Schine  Theatres  on  Trial 
Second  Time  in  Buffalo 

BUFFALO'.  Schine  Chain  Theatres  and  its. 
officers  went  on  trial  for  the  second  time 
January  4 on  charges  of  criminal  and  civil 
contempt.  The  trial  is  expected  to  termi- 
nate next  week.  The  case  was  first  tried 
before  the  late  Judge  John  Knight,  who  died 
before  he  could  render  a verdict  after  13 
weeks  of  litigation.  The  proceedings  against 
J.  Myer  Schine  and  his  brother  Louis  W’. 
Schine  charge  the  defendants  conspired  to 
violate  the  1949  consent  decree  between  the 
Government  and  Schine  Theatres.  One  of 
the  original  defendants,  Elmer  F.  Lux,  won 
a judgment  at  the  conclusion  of  the  Govern- 
ment’s case  before  Judge  Knight. 


22 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956. 


{mOifleMtSOMB  *S 

Plan  Backed 
By  COMBO 

The  Goldenson  plan,  which  stresses  the 
need  to  win  back  the  women  audiences  to 
motion  picture  theatres,  won  enthusiastic 
support  from  the  Council  of  Motion  Picture 
Organizations  press  relations  committee 
when  it  met  in  New  York  last  week. 

The  committee,  meeting  with  Harry 
Mandel  of  RKO  Theatres  as  chairman, 
agreed  on  the  necessity  of  finding  ways  and 
means  to  put  the  project  into  effect,  accord- 
ing to  Mr.  Mandel.  It  was  further  agreed 
that  each  member  of  the  committee  submit 
ideas  to  the  group’s  next  meeting,  slated  for 
next  week.  The  meeting  was  addressed  by 
Leonard  Goldenson,  president  of  American 
Broadcasting-Paramount  Theatres  and  au- 
thor of  the  plan,  which  holds  that  with  in- 
creased automation  in  the  home,  the  stress 
and  strain  of  family  living  can  be  relieved 
by  seeing  motion  pictures  away  from  home, 
in  theatres,  thereby  wisely  utilizing  the  in- 
creased free  time  enjoyed  by  the  heads  of 
families. 

Mr.  Mandel  said  the  committee  will  pur- 
sue as  far  as  it  can  Mr.  Goldenson’s  pro- 
posal of  devising  a public  relations  program 
to  meet  the  AB-PT  president’s  points.  He 
called  the  entire  theme  of  recapturing  audi- 
ences, especially  the  women,  “urgent”  and 
“necessary.”  Women,  according  to  Mr. 
Goldenson,  set  the  film-going  habits  of  the 
family. 

Attending  the  meeting  in  addition  to  Mr. 
Mandel  and  Mr.  Goldenson  were : Harry 
Goldberg,  Stanley  Warner ; Ernie  Emerling, 
Loew’s  Theatres;  Dave  Diener,  Monroe 
Greenthal  agency;  Robert  Coyne,  special 
counsel  of  COMPO ; Charles  McCarthy, 
COMPO  information  director;  and  Ken 
Clark,  of  the  Motion  Picture  Association 
of  America. 

3 United  Artists  Films 
Released  in  January 

United  Artists  this  month  will  release 
nationally  “The  Man  With  the  Golden 
Arm,”  “Three  Bad  Sisters,”  and  “Storm 
Fear,”  it  is  announced  by  William  J.  Heine- 
man,  vice-president  in  charge  of  distribu- 
tion. “The  Man  With  the  Golden  Arm,” 
produced  and  directed  by  Otto  Preminger, 
stars  Frank  Sinatra,  Eleanor  Parker  and 
Kim  Novak.  The  screenplay,  based  on  Nel- 
son Algren’s  prize-winning  novel,  was  writ- 
ten by  Walter  Newman  and  Lewis  Meltzer. 
“Three  Bad  Sisters,”  a Bel-Air  production, 
co-stars  Marla  English,  Kathleen  Hughes, 
Sara  Shane  and  John  Bromfield.  Executive 
producer  is  Aubrey  Schenck.  Howard  W. 
Koch  is  producer  and  Gilbert  L.  Kay  direc- 
tor of  the  suspense  drama,  from  a screenplay 
by  Gerald  Drayson  Adams.  “Storm  Fear,” 
produced  and  directed  by  Cornel  Wilde, 
stars  Wilde,  Jean  Wallace  and  Dan  Duryea. 
Horton  Foote  wrote  the  screenplay,  based 
on  a novel  by  Clinton  Seeley. 


J^oiiawoocl 


^cene 


HOLLYWOOD  BUREAU 

In  the  second  of  two  successive  holiday- 
shortened  weeks  Hollywood  started  four  new 
pictures  and  completed  six  others  on  which 
camera  work  had  been  in  progress  a good 
while.  At  weekend  the  over-all  total  of  films 
in  the  shooting  stage  was  25. 

Three  major  producer-distributing  com- 
panies and  one  independent  producer  are 
represented  in  the  new  projects  launched 
during  the  week. 

Universal-International  launched  “The 
Gentle  Web,”  in  color  by  Technicolor,  which 
Gordon  Kay  is  producing,  and  Harry  Keller 
directing,  with  Esther  Williams,  George 
Nader,  Edward  Andrews,  John  Saxon  and 
April  Kent  in  the  cast. 

Producer-d'rector  Elia  Kazan  started 
“Baby  Doll”  for  Warner  Brothers  with  Karl 
Malden,  Carroll  Baker  and  Eli  Wallach  in 
principal  roles. 

Producer  Charles  Brackett  started  filming 
“The  Sixth  of  June”  for  20th-Fox,  directed 
by  Henry  Koster  with  Richard  Todd,  Ed- 
mond O’Brien,  Dana  Wynter  and  Robert 
Taylor. 

Independent  producer  Sol  Lesser  started 
“Tarzan  and  the  Lost  Safari”  with  John 
Croydon  producing  and  Bruce  Humberstone 
directing.  The  cast  includes  Gordon  Scott, 
Peter  Arne,  Betta  St.  John,  Yolande  Donlon, 
George  Coulouris  and  Robert  Beatty. 

Allied  Artists  to  Launch 
Five  Productions  Shortly 

HOLLYWOOD : Allied  Artists  has  five 
pictures  on  its  production  schedule,  set  to 
start  early  in  1956,  it  is  announced  by  exec- 
utive producer  Walter  Mirisch.  First  on  the 
agenda  is  “Cattle  King,”  starring  George 
Montgomery,  with  Richard  Heermance  pro- 
ducing. Also  on  Heermance’s  schedule  is 
“Legionnaire.”  Hayes  Goetz  will  produce 
“Hold  Back  the  Night,”  a drama  of  the 
Marines  in  Korea.  A third  Heermance  pro- 
duction will  be  “Young  Guns.”  Lindsley 
Parsons  will  produce  for  Allied  Artists  re- 
lease “Massacre  at  Dragoon  Wells,”  with 
John  Burrows  as  associate  and  Harold 
Schuster  directing.  Barry  Sullivan  will 
star.  

Grant,  Hitchcock,  Paramount 
In  New  Contract  Agreement 

Cary  Grant,  Alfred  Hitchcock  and  Para- 
mount Pictures  have  entered  into  a three- 
way  agreement  to  make  several  pictures 
during  the  next  few  years,  according  to  the 
studio.  Mr.  Grant  will  star  in  all  the  films 
with  Mr.  Hitchcock  producing  and  directing. 
The  new  contract  is  in  addition  to  two 
earlier  individual  contracts  between  the 
actor  and  Paramount  and  between  the  di- 
rector and  Paramount,  it  was  announced. 
No  story  property  has  been  announced  yet 
as  the  first  production  under  the  new  three- 
way  contract. 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimii 

THIS  WEEK  IN 
PRODUCTION: 


STARTED  (4) 

INDEPENDENT 

Tarzan  and  the  Lost 
Safari  (Sol  Lesser 
Prods.;  wide-screen) 

20TH-FOX 

The  Sixth  of  J une 

COMPLETED  (5) 

ALLIED  ARTISTS 

Crashing  Las  Vegas 
The  Friendly  Persuasion 
- (Wide-screen; 

De  Luxe  Color) 


SHOOTING  (21) 

ALLIED  ARTISTS 

The  Magnificent 
Roughnecks 

COLUMBIA 

Black  Mamba  (Todon 
Prods.;  CinemaScope; 
Technicolor) 

Zarak  Kham  (Warwick; 
CinemaScope; 
Technicolor) 

Portrait  in  Smoke 
(Films  Locations) 

MGM 

The  Catered  Affair 
The  Living  Idol  (Al 
Lewin;  CinemaScope; 
Eastman  Color) 

PARAMOUNT 

Pardners  ( VistaVision ; 

Technicolor) 

Ten  Commandments 
(VistaVision; 
Technicolor) 

REPUBLIC 

Dakota  Incident 
(Trucolor) 

Lisbon  (Naturama; 

T rucolor) 

20TH-FOX 

The  Man  In  the  Gray 
Flannel  Suit  (Cinema- 


U-l 

The  Gentle  Web 
(Technicolor) 

WARNER  BROS. 

Baby  Doll  (Newton 
Prod.;  wide-screen) 


COLUMBIA 

It  Happened  One  Night 
(CinemaScope; 
Technicolor) 

The  Harder  They  Fall 

U-l 

Toy  Tiger  (Technicolor) 


Scope;  De  Luxe 
Color) 

23  Paces  to  Baker 
Street  (Cinema- 
Scope; De  Luxe 
Color) 

Revolt  of  Mamie  Stover 
(CinemaScope; 

De  Luxe  Color) 

King  and  I (Cinema- 
Scope; De  Luxe 
Color) 

UNITED  ARTISTS 

Bandido  (Bandido 
Prod.;  CinemaScope: 
De  Luxe  Color) 

Ambassador's  Daughter 
(Norman  Krasna 
Prods.;  CinemaScope; 
Eastman  Color) 

U-l 

Johnny  Salvo 

Written  on  the  Wind 
(Technicolor) 

Apache  Agent 
( CinemaScope; 
Technicolor) 

WARNER  BROS. 

Spirit  of  St.  Louis 
(CinemaScope: 
WarnerColor) 

Santiago  (Wide  screen: 
WarnerColor) 


llllllilliimililllllllllllllllllMIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIil 

RKO  Buys  Dozier  Story 

HOLLYWOOD:  RKO  Radio  Pictures  has 
purchased  “Is  This  Our  Son?”  a modern 
drama  about  tne  adjustment  of  a teen-age 
boy  to  his  parents,  from  writer  Robert  Do- 
zier and  will  produce  the  film  with  an  all- 
star  cast  in  June.  Under  the  title,  “Deal 
a Blow,”  the  play  won  the  Christopher 
Award  when  it  was  presented  on  CBS-TV’s 
“Climax,”  Mr.  Dozier  will  do  the  script. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


23 


Your  first  chance  to  see  for  yourself: 

I the  images  are  radiantly  bright  and  sharp 

I the  backgrounds  are  as  clearly  in  focus 
as  the  foregrounds 

I the  illusion  of  depth  is  breathtaking 

I no  distortion,  no  fading  at  extreme  sides  or  top 
and  bottom  of  screen 


I the  same  fine  quality  when  viewed  from  any 
seat  in  the  theatre 


NO  CHANGES  REQUIRED  IN  THE  BOOTHS  OF 
THEATRES  EQUIPPED  FOR  STEREOPHONIC  SOUND 


begin  JANUARY  23 


1 


Below  is  a list  of  the  cities,  theatres  and  dates 
on  which  these  demonstrations  will  be  held: 


CITY 

THEATRE 

DATE 

CITY 

THEATRE 

DATE 

ALBANY 

Palace 

Feb.  6 

LOUISVILLE 

Rialto 

Feb.  18 

ALBUQUERQUE 

Sunshine 

Feb.  19 

MEMPHIS 

Malco 

Feb.  3 

ATLANTA 

Fox 

Jan.  30 

MIAMI 

Carib 

Feb.  1 

BALTIMORE 

New 

Feb.  10 

MILWAUKEE 

Wisconsin 

Feb.  7 

BIRMINGHAM 

Alabama 

Feb.  15 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Radio  City 

Feb.  6 

BOSTON 

Memorial 

Jan.  24 

MISSOULA 

Fox 

Jan.  30 

BUFFALO 

Center 

Jan.  3 1 

NEW  HAVEN 

Poli 

Feb.  7 

CHARLESTON,  W.VA.  Kearse 

Feb.  15 

NEW  ORLEANS 

Saenger 

Feb.  2 

CHARLOHE 

Carolina 

Jan.  27 

NEW  YORK 

Roxy 

Jan.  23 

CHATTANOOGA 

Tivoli 

Feb.  10 

OKLAHOMA  CITY 

Criterion 

Feb.  8 

CHICAGO 

Uptown 

Jan.  23 

OAAAHA 

Orpheum 

Feb.  2 

CINCINNATI 

Albee 

Jan.  25 

PHILADELPHIA 

Fox 

Jan.  25 

CLEVELAND 

Palace 

Jan.  27 

PHOENIX 

Fox 

Feb.  21 

COLUMBUS 

Palace 

Feb.  16 

PinSBURGH 

Fulton 

Jan.  30 

DALLAS 

Palace 

Feb.  7 

PORTLAND 

Fox 

Jan.  25 

DENVER 

Center 

Feb.  1 

RICHMOND 

Byrd 

Feb.  13 

DES  MOINES 

Des  Moines 

Feb.  3 

ROANOKE 

Grandin 

Feb.  14 

DETROIT 

Fox 

Jan.  26 

ROCHESTER 

Palace 

Feb.  2 

FT.  WAYNE 

Paramount 

Feb.  14 

ST.  LOUIS 

St.  Louis 

Feb.  10 

GRAND  RAPIDS 

Majestic 

Feb.  15 

SALT  LAKE  CITY 

Villa 

Jan.  31 

HARRISBURG 

State 

Feb.  9 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

Fox 

' Jan.  24 

HOUSTON 

Metropolitan 

Feb.  6 

SEAHLE 

5th  Avenue 

Jan.  26 

INDIANAPOLIS 

Indiana 

Jan.  24 

SHREVEPORT 

Don 

Feb.  14 

JACKSONVILLE 

Florida 

Jan.  31 

SPOKANE 

Fox 

Jan.  27 

SPRINGFIELD,  ILL. 

Lincoln 

Feb.  1 3 

KANSAS  CITY 

Orpheum 

Feb.  9 

Feb.  3 

SYRACUSE 

Paramount 

KNOXVILLE 

Tennessee 

Feb.  9 

TORONTO 

Imperial 

Feb.  1 

LEXINGTON 

Ben  Ali 

Feb.  17 

WASHINGTON 

Palace 

Jan.  26 

LIHLE  ROCK 

Capitol 

Feb.  13 

WICHITA 

Miller 

Feb.  17 

LOS  ANGELES 

Village 

Jan.  23 

WILKES  BARRE 

Paramount 

Feb.  8 

All  showings  begin  promptly  at  9:4S  a.  m., 
except  Rpxy,  N.  Y.,  which  begins  at  9:15  a.  m. 


13^^  always  a pleasure  to  do  business  with  20th!” 


See  Ewtd  of 
^Memphis 
Cewtsorsh  ip 

It’s  official  now.  the  Memphis  committee 
appointed  by  Mayor-elect  Edmund  Orgill 
has  recommended  the  censor  board  be 
abolished. 

That  board,  as  headed  many  years  by 
89-year-old  Lloyd  B inford,  is  probably  the 
most  famous  in  the  land.  It  inveighed 
against  all  sorts  of  film  subjects  deemed 
safe  in  other  areas,  and  banned  them,  to  the 
profit  of  makers  glad  about  the  publicity. 

The  Mayor’s  committee  said  it  opposes 
flatly  "previous  restraint  censorship.”  It 
added  it  feels  it  “contrary  to  the  American 
concept  of  freedom.  It  added  the  film  in- 
dustry’s voluntary  censorship  and  that  af- 
forded by  police  powers,  are  enough 
protection. 

Mr.  Binford  has  said  he  would  accept 
reappointment.  His  term  and  those  of  four 
other  board  members  expired  Saturday.  The 
chairman  of  the  committee,  attorney  John 
.■\pperson,  wrote  he  doubted  it  is  wise  to 
reappoint  any  old  member. 

He  added  that  if  the  new  city  commis- 
sion desires  censorship  it  might  have  a 
three  member  board  review  only  pictures 
lacking  the  Code  seal.  His  report  also  ad- 
vised exhibitors  be  asked  to  advertise 
whether  a picture  has  a seal,  and  for  what 
audience  it  is  suitable. 


"Conqueror"  Tokyo  Debut  Set 

“The  Conqueror,”  CinemaScope-Techni- 
color  production  from  RKO  Radio  Pictures, 
starring  John  Wayne,  Susan  Hayward  and 
Pedro  Armendariz,  and  produced  and  di- 
rected by  Dick  Powell,  will  open  at  the 
Takarazuka  theatre,  Japan,  January  29,  it 
is  announced  by  Walter  Branson,  RKO  vice- 
president  in  charge  of  distribution.  The 
premiere  will  benefit  the  Cancer  Institute 
and  is  sponsored  by  a leading  Japanese 
newspaper.  The  “Conqueror”  debut  activi- 
ties will  be  duplicated  in  other  capitals  of 
the  world  within  a few  days  of  each  other 
during  late  January. 


Sonja  Henie  at  Roxy 

.Sonja  Henie  and  her  new  ice  review  will 
appear  in  person  at  the  Roxy  theatre.  New 
York,  starting  January  11,  it  has  been  an- 
nounced by  the  theatre.  She  will  appear  in 
conjunction  with  20th  Century-Fox’s  "The 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts.”  It  will  mark  Miss 
Henie’s  first  appearance  anywhere  in  the 
world  at  “popular”  prices  according  to  the 
theatre. 


New  York  Theatre  Reopens 

iROSENDALE,  N.  Y.:  The  Ro.sendale  thea- 
tre here  has  been  reopened  after  undergoing 
a complete  refurbishing  following  last  Fall’s 
■flood.  A new  and  graduated  floor,  new  foam 
rubber  cushioned  seats,  new  carpets  and  a 
new  screen  were  installed,  it  was  announced. 


THE  WINNERS  CIRCLE 

Pictures  which  were  reported  as  doing  above  average  business  in  key  cities  of  the 
nation  for  the  week  ended  December  31  were: 


Albany:  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy  Mit- 
chell (W.B.)  ; The  Rains  of  Ranchipur 
(20th-Fox) . 

Atlanta:  All  That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I)  ; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  ; The  Rains  of 
Ranchipur  (20th-Fox)  ; The  Spoilers 
(U-I). 

Boston:  The  African  Lion  (B.V.)  ; Art- 
ists AND  Models  (Par.) ; Court  Martial 
OF  Billy  Mitchell  (W.B.)  ; Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  ; I Am  a Camera 
(D.C.A.);  Lease  of  Life  (IFF). 

Bufifalo:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  2nd 
week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Indian 
Fighter  (U.A.) ; The  Rains  of  Ranch- 
ipur (20th-Fox). 

Chicago:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  ; Diab- 
OLIQUE  (UMPO)  ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  7th  week;  I’ll  Cry  Tomorrow 
(MGM)  ; The  Littlest  Outlaw  (B.V.)  ; 
Quentin  Durward  (MGM) ; The  Second 
Greatest  Sex  (U-I). 

Cleveland:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.); 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM) ; Heihi  and 
Peter  (U.A.) ; The  Rains  of  Ranchipur 
(20th-Fox) ; The  Second  Greatest  Sex 
(U-I);  The  Sheep  Has  Five  Legs 
(UMPO);  The  Spoilers  (U-I). 

Columbus:  The  African  Lion  (B.V.)  ; 
Artists  and  Models  (Par.) ; Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM);  Kismet  (MGM). 

Denver:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) ; The 
Court  Martial  of  Billy  Mitchell 
(W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM) ; Heidi 
AND  Peter  (U.A.)  ; The  Indian  Fighter 
(U.A.)  ; The  Littlest  Outlaw  (B.V.)  ; 
The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox). 

Des  Moines:  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  2nd  week. 

Detroit:  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  6th 
week;  The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th- 
Fox) . 

Hartford:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  2nd 
week;  Court  Martial  of  Billy  Mitchell 
(W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  2nd 
week;  The  Last  Frontier  (Col.)  2nd 
week;  The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th- 
Fox) ; Top  Gun  (U.A.). 

Indianapolis:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  ; 
The  Court  Martial  of  Billy  Mitchell 
(W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  2nd 
week;  The  Indian  Fighter  (U.A.). 

.Jacksonville:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I)  2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of 
Billy  Mitchell  (W.B.) ; The  Last 
Frontier  (Col.);  The  Rains  of  Ranch- 
ipur (20th-Fox). 

Kansas  City:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  ; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  ; Kismet 


(MGM)  ; The  Rains  of  Ranchipur 
(20th-Fox)  ; The  Return  of  Jack  Slade 
(A.A.). 

Memphis:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) ; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM). 

.Miami:  All  That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I); 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  2nd  week; 
Kismet  (MGM). 

Milwaukee:  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM). 

Minneapolis:  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  ; 
The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox) ; 
Rebel  Without  a Cause  (W.B.)  5th 
week;  The  Trouble  With  Harry  (Par). 

New  Orleans:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I) ; Artists  and  Models  (Par.) ; Big 
Knife  The  (U.A.) ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  ; Heidi  and  Peter  (U.A.)  ; In- 
dian Fighter,  The  (U.A.). 

Oklahoma  City:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  2nd  week;  Kismet  (MGM)  2nd 
week;  The  Return  of  Jack  Slade 
(A.A.)  2nd  week. 

Philadelphia:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  ; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  7th  week;  The 
Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox) ; The 
Second  Greatest  Sex  (U-I). 

Pittsburgh:  African  Lion  (B.V.)  2nd 

week;  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  2nd 
week;  The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th- 
Fox)  2nd  week;  The  Sheep  Has  Five 
Legs  (UMPO)  2nd  week. 

Portland:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  ; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  ; The  Indian 
Fighter  (U.A.). 

Providence:  African  Lion  (B.V.)  ; Artists 
AND  Models  (Par.)  ; Kismet  (MGM)  ; 
The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox). 

San  Francisco:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  6th  week;  Kismet 

(MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Night  My  Num- 
ber Came  Up  (Cont.  Dist.)  2nd  week; 
The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox) 
2nd  week. 

Toronto:  The  African  Lion  (B.V.) ; Art- 
ists AND  Models  (Par.)  ; Doctor  at  Sea 
(Jaro) ; Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  ; The 
Tender  Trap  (MGM)  4th  week. 

Vancouver:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  ; 
Good  Morning,  Miss  Dove  (20th-Fox) ; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM) ; The  Indian 
Fighter  (U.A.) ; A Man  Alone  (Rep.). 

Washington:  ARTISTS  AND  MODELS  (Par.)  ; 
The  Desperate  Hours  (Par.)  7th  week; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  6th  week; 
Kismet  (MGM);  The  Last  Frontier 
(Col.) ; The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th- 
Fox) ; The  Second  Greatest  Sex  (U-I) ; 
Trouble  With  Harry  (Par.)  5th  week. 


'26 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


MIGHTY  SERIAL 

adventures  off  tire  ffrontier’s 


eUN  EMPEROR  OF  THE  NORTHWEST! 


Starring 


RICHARD  EMORY -EVE  ANDERSON  • KENNETH  R.  MagDONALD 

Story  and  Screen  Play  by  GEORGE  H.  PLYMPTON  • Produced  by  SAM  KATZMAN 
Directed  by  SPENCER  G.  BENNET 


A SENSATIONAL  CAMPAIGN  BOOK 
FOR  THIS  SUPER-ACTION  SERIAL  FROM 


Mill  ode n Sees 
Big  Year  tor 

Shoirnten 

♦ 

HOLLVJrOOD : “Falling  attendance  is  a 
challenge  to  the  showmanship  ability  of  our 
company,”  Elmer  C.  Rhoden,  president  of 
National  Theatres,  asserted  in  a year-end 
message  to  the  circuit’s  staff.  While  ad- 
mitting that  the  past  year  had  been  “a  try- 
ing one.”  Mr.  Rhoden  cited  many  techno- 
logical improvements,  the  availability  of 
“Oklahoma !”  in  Todd-AO  and  the  start  of 
the  first  picture  in  the  new  Cinemiracle 
process,  as  examples  of  an  upward  trend. 

Pointing  out  that  the  greatest  enthusiasm 
in  the  casting  of  ballots  in  the  Audience 
Awards  was  registered  by  the  young  people, 
Mr.  Rhoden  added : “We  must  give  careful 
analysis  to  the  selling  approach  of  our  at- 
tractions ; we  no  longer  can  assume  that 
pictures  have  a pre-sold  market.”  Mr. 
Rhoden  contended  that  “we  were  faced  witli 
an  acute  shortage  of  quality  motion  pic- 
tures” during  1955  “in  spite  of  greater  ef- 
forts on  the  part  of  our  Hollywood  produc- 
ers,” and  that  “the  final  result  was  that  the 
entertainment  missed  the  mass  appeal  that 
we  hoped  and  expected  to  get.” 

He  summed  it  all  up  with  a question : 
“Are  we  making  pictures  that  appeal  to 
that  great  segment  of  the  movie  public  ?” 
— referring  to  the  younger  patrons. 

Louis  Gordon  Retiring  from 
Lockwood  & Gordon  Circuit 

BOSTOX : Louis  M.  Gordon,  president  of 
Lockwood  & Gordon  Enterprises,  and  gen- 
eral manager  of  theatre  operations  of  the 
circuit,  has  announced  his  retirement  from 
active  participation  in  the  business  starting 
this  month.  However,  he  will  retain  his 
financial  interest  in  the  company  and  will 
continue  as  consultant,  director  and  officer  of 
the  organization.  Douglas  Amos,  district 
manager  of  the  circuit’s  Connecticut  district, 
has  been  promoted  to  general  manager  in 
charge  of  theatre  operations  for  the  circuit 
and  will  assume  his  new  duties  January  17. 


New  Cooper  Head 

OMAHA : Pat  McGee  has  been  succeeded 
as  general  manager  of  the  Cooper  Founda- 
tion circuit  by  Kenneth  E.  Anderson.  Mr. 
McGee,  whose  headquarters  are  in  Denver, 
is  remaining  as  buyer  and  booker  for  all 
Cooper  theatres.  Mr.  Anderson,  a well- 
known  attorney  of  Lincoln,  Neb.,  has  re- 
signed from  his  law  firm  to  take  the  post  as 
head  of  the  circuit. 


Greenblatt  Heads  Drive 

Arthur  Greenblatt,  Allied  Artists  home 
office  sales  executive,  has  been  named  captain 
of  the  company’s  March  of  Progress  Drive, 
it  is  announced  by  Morey  R.  Goldstein,  vice- 
president  and  general  sales  manager.  The 
sales  drive  period  embraces  the  17  weeks 
from  January  28  to  May  24. 


Roy  Rogers  and  Dale  Evans  will  be  hon- 
ored by  a testimonial  dinner  at  the 
Masquer’s  Club,  Hollywood,  January  12, 
and  will  receive  the  George  Spelvin 
Actors’  award  for  their  humanitarian 
services. 

Stephen  Bosustow,  president  of  UFA  Pic- 
tures, Inc.,  and  Ernest  Scanlon,  UPA’s 
treasurer  and  business  manager,  flew 
from  Hollywood  to  New  York  this  week 
for  the  semi-annual  meeting  with  the  East 
Coast  animation  studio. 

Mort  B.  Blumenstock,  Warner  Bros, 
vice-president,  became  a grandfather  for 
the  second  time  last  week  when  his  daugh- 
ter, Mrs.  Marvin  Perskie,  gave  birth  to 
a boy. 


Matthew  Fox  Is  Sued 
In  Contract  Action 

Matthew  Fox  and  four  companies  which 
he  controls  were  named  defendants  in  a 
$550,000  breach  of  contract  suit  filed  in  New 
York  Supreme  Court  last  week.  The  plain- 
tiffs were  Joseph  Harris,  Seymour  Wein- 
traub  and  James  B.  Harris.  The  defendant 
companies  were  Reynard  International 
Corp.,  Western  Television  Corp.,  Motion 
Pictures  for  Television,  Inc.,  and  MPTV 
Syndication  Corp.  The  plaintiffs  charged 
that  as  executives  of  Reynard  International 
they  had  a contract  for  salaries  of  $50,000 
a year  each  plus  percentages  over  a period 
of  10  years.  In  1953,  it  was  claimed,  Mr. 
Fox  took  over  the  contracts  and  agreed  to 
pay  off  the  plaintiffs  at  salaries  ranging 
from  $300  to  $375  a week.  The  suit  claimed 
the  salaries  were  forthcoming  for  a while 
and  then  stopped. 

Legion  Approves  Nine  of 
15  New  Productions 

The  National  Legion  of  Decency  this 
week  reviewed  15  pictures,  putting  four  in 
Class  A,  Section  I,  morally  unobjectionable 
for  general  patronage;  five  in  Class  A,  Sec- 
tion II,  morally  unobjectionable  for  adults, 
and  six  in  Class  B,  morally  objectionable  in 
part  for  all.  In  Section  I are  “The  Benny 
Goodman  Story,”  “The  Court  Martial  of 
Billy  Mitchell,”  “Ghost  Town”  and  “The 
Twinkle  in  God’s  Eye.”  In  Section  II  are 
“Diane,”  “I’ll  Cry  Tomorrow,”  “The  Last 
Erontier,”  “The  Rains  of  Ranchipur”  and 
“The  Spoilers.”  In  Class  B are  “The  Edge 
of  Fury”  because  of  “suggestive  situations”; 
“Flame  of  the  Islands”  because  of  “sug- 
gestive costuming  and  sequences” ; “The 
Houston  Story”  because  of  “excessive  bru- 
tality; suggestive  dialogue  and  situations”; 
“The  Indian  Fighter”  because  of  suggestive 
situations” ; “The  Man  with  the  Golden 


Alfred  H.  Tamarin,  United  Artists’  assist- 
ant national  director  of  advertising,  pub- 
licity and  exploitation,  has  accepted  the 
post  of  publicity  chairman  of  the  amuse- 
ment industry’s  Brotherhood  Drive  for 
1956. 

Clarence  J.  Schneider  has  been  appointed 
assistant  manager  of  the  United  Artists 
foreign  publicity  department.  He  replaces 
Ben  Halpern,  who  has  been  elevated 
to  the  post  of  U.A.  manager  of  advertis- 
ing, publicity  and  exploitation  for  Europe 
and  the  Middle  East. 

Olga  Gramaglia,  technical  director  of  the 
Museum  of  Modern  Art  Film  Library, 
has  resigned.  Her  successor  is  Charles 
Cole,  formerly  technical  coordinator  of 
Graphic  Films. 


Arm”  because  “this  film  is  of  low  moral 
tone  throughout  because  it  tends  to  mini- 
mize the  moral  obligations  of  all  the  princi- 
pal characters.  It  treats  in  terms  of  morbid 
sensationalism  with  narcotic  addiction  and 
in  so  doing  fails  to  avoid  the  harmful  impli- 
cations relative  to  this  moral  and  socio- 
logical problem.  It  also  contains  suggestive 
costuming,  dialogue  and  situations,”  and 
“Three  Bad  Sisters”  because  of  “low  moral 
tone.” 

Plans  Set  for  Charity 
Premiere  of  "Carousel" 

Leading  business,  civic  and  medical  fig- 
ures and  stars  of  20th  Century-Fox’s  Cin- 
emaScope  55  production,  “Carousel,”  were 
present  at  a special  meeting  last  week  at 
New  York  Medical  College  to  set  plans 
for  the  charity  world  premiere  of  the  film 
February  16  at  the  Roxy  theatre.  New  York. 
At  the  meeting,  committees  were  organized 
to  aid  in  the  sale  of  premiere  tickets  and 
to  handle  related  activities  throughout  the 
city  calling  attention  to  the  event. 


Skouras  Plans  Theatre 

Spyros  S.  Skouras,  president  of  Skouras 
Theatres  Corp.,  New  York,  has  announced 
plans  to  build  a 1,450-seat  theatre  on  Jericho 
Turnpike  in  Syosset,  Long  Island.  The  the- 
atre should  be  ready  by  the  Fall  of  1956, 
it  was  announced,  with  a parking  lot,  ac- 
commodating several  hundred  cars,  to  be 
adjacent  to  the  theatre. 


Fox  Wisconsin  Names  Frank 

MILWAUKEE : Albert  P.  Frank  has  been 
named  general  manager  of  the  Fox  Wiscon- 
sin Amusement  Corp.  here.  He  began  his 
film  management  career  in  Fond  du  Lac, 
Wise.,  as  an  usher  for  National  Theatres  in 
1940  and  was  recently  district  manager  for 
the  Fox  organization  in  Fond  du  Lac. 


28 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


ALBANY 

Control  of  teen  agers  and  children  has  be- 
come a major  problem  in  many  theatres 
here.  Older  persons  often  complain  that  the 
noise  they  make  interferes  with  the  enjoy- 
ment of  pictures,  and,  in  some  cases,  stay 
away  or  threaten  to  do  so,  until  the  con- 
dition is  rectified.  How  to  retain  the  patron- 
age of  both  groups,  while  pleasing  each,  is 
a question  to  which  careful  industry  study 
now  is  being  given.  . . . Variety  Club  new 
house  rules  provide  that  members  are  re- 
sponsible at  all  times  for  the  conduct  of 
guests,  who,  if  from  Tri-City  area  (Albany, 
Schenectady  and  Troy),  may  not  visit  the 
rooms  more  than  once  monthly.  An  excep- 
tion is  “Family  Nights,”  Saturday-Sunday. 
Out-of-town  guests  have  the  friendly  wel- 
come at  all  times.  . . . Charles  L.  Mooney, 
managing  editor  of  Knickerbocker  News, 
and  long-time  friend  of  industry  people,  is 
joining  Tent  9.  Gene  Robb,  Times  Union 
publisher,  is  already  a barker.  . . . Charles 
A.  Smakwitz,  Stanley  Warner  zone  man- 
ager in  Newark  and  former  local  zone  chief, 
was  saluted  by  Forrest  Willis,  via  WTRY, 
as  a man  “who  did  as  much  for  Albany  as 
anyone  I knew.” 

ATLANTA 

President  William  K.  Jenkins,  Georgia 
theatre,  was  in  Atlanta  visiting  from  his 
home  in  Florida.  . . . Charles  Colville,  for- 
mer owner  of  the  Court  theatre,  Loudon, 
Tenn.,  died  at  his  home  there.  . . . Miss  June 
Roscoe,  daughter  of  sales  manager  for  Co- 
lumbia Pictures,  George  Roscoe,  was  in 
Atlanta  visiting  after  four  months  in  Lon- 
don. . . . Roy  Whitmire,  father  of  Miss 
Betty  Whitmire,  A.  Rook  Film  Booking 
Office,  is  recuperating  at  the  hospital  here 
after  an  operation.  ...  A permit  was  issued 
to  Charles  E.  Myers  of  Pompona  Beach, 
Fla.,  for  a drive-in  theatre,  to  cost  around 
$50,000.  . . . Fred  Lee,  district  manager  for 
the  Florida  State  Theatres,  has  arranged 
with  the  Hollywood  Beach,  Fla.,  Hotel  to 
show  classics  and  art  films  twice  a week 
during  the  winter.  . . . Mr.  and  Mrs.  Arthur 
Cutter,  owners  of  the  Magolia  theatre, 
Titusville,  Fla.,  has  installed  CinemaScope 
and  all  new  booth  equipment.  . . . The  city 
fathers  of  Bessemer,  Ala.,  have  appointed  a 
censor  board  to  look  at  all  pictures  shown 
there.  The  Rev.  F.  E.  Jordan  is  board  chair- 
man. . . . Dick  Johnson,  formerly  with  the 
Floyd  theatre  in  Florida,  has  been  appointed 
office  manager  and  booker  for  ABC  Booking 
Service.  He  replaces  Cliff  Wilson,  who  re- 
signed to  go  with  the  Paramount-Gulf  Thea- 
tres in  New  Orleans. 

BOSTON 

Louis  M.  Gordon,  president  of  Lockwood 
& Gordon  Enterprises,  Inc.,  and  Mrs.  Gor- 
don left  January  6 for  a prolonged  vacation 
in  Varadero  Beach,  Cuba.  He  has  an- 
nounced his  retirement  from  active  partici- 
pation in  the  circuit  where  he  was  general 
manager  of  theatre  operations.  Douglas 
Amos,  district  manager  for  the  Connecticut 
district,  has  stepped  up  into  the  general 


managership  spot.  Gordon  will  retain  his 
financial  interest  with  the  company  and  will 
continue  as  consultant,  director  and  officer. 
. . . American  Theatres  Corp.  has  reopened 
three  neighborhood  houses  which  were 
closed  for  the  pre-Christmas  season.  Thea- 
tres involved  are  the  Warren,  Plaza  in  Rox- 
bury  and  the  Central,  Somerville.  . . . Hud 
Conway  has  closed  the  Gem,  Vinal  Haven, 
Me.,  for  the  winter.  . . . Following  the  suc- 
cessful opening  of  E.  M.  Loew’s  Gulf  Stream 
drive-in,  Hallendale,  Fla.,  Dick  Rubin,  de- 
signer and  engineer,  returned  to  Boston  to 
work  on  the  plans  for  the  remodeling  of  the 
Lowell  drive-in  recently  purchased  by  Nor- 
man Glassman  for  next  season’s  operation. 
. . . The  Christmas  weekend  business  was 
good  but  did  not  reach  the  figures  of  the 
1954  week. 

BUFFALO 

Negotiations  are  under  way  for  the  sale 
of  the  Erlanger  theatre,  118  Delaware  Ave- 
nue, now  owned  by  Dipson  Theatres,  Inc. 
“The  deal  is  still  pending  and  an  announce- 
ment will  be  made  shortly,”  William  J.  Dip- 
son,  president  of  Dipson  Theatres,  an- 
nounces. The  property  has  an  assessed  valu- 
ation of  $241,290.  . . . “Cinerama  Holiday” 
will  open  in  the  Teck  theatre  Jan.  31.  The 
premiere  will  be  sponsored  by  the  Greater 
Buffalo  Advertising  Club.  “This  Is  Cine- 
rama,” which  has  run  a year  in  the  Teck, 
closes  Jan.  29.  . . . Boris  Bernardi,  the  new 
manager  at  the  Teck,  comes  to  Buffalo  from 
Texas,  where  he  was  manager  of  a theatre 
showing  Cinerama.  A native  of  Boston,  Ber- 
nardi has  led  several  Yankee  shows  in  Euro- 
pean invasions.  Eor  a while  he  managed  the 
Teatro  Ombu  in  Buenos  Aires.  He  is  a 
member  of  a theatrical  family  which  broke 
him  in  at  the  age  of  13  as  assistant  treasurer 
of  the  Old  Grand  Opera  House  in  Boston. 
He  has  operated  twelve  theatres  at  a time 
in  Michigan,  three  in  New  York  and  one 
in  Brooklyn.  . . . John  W.  Sawyer,  69,  chief 
projectionist  here  for  the  Stanley  Warner 
Cinerama  Corporation,  died  Dec.  25  in  his 
home  at  277  Linwood  Avenue.  He  was  super- 
visor of  projection  and  sound  for  the  Shea 
theatres  for  30  years  before  joining  the 
Warner  company  last  March.  A native  of 
Newport,  R.  L,  Mr.  Sawyer  became  pro- 
jectionist in  the  old  Victoria  theatre  at  17 
and  later  managed  that  theatre.  . . . The 
U.  S.  Court  of  Appeals  has  refused  to  tem- 
porarily block  the  sale  of  Station  WBUE- 
TV,  Buffalo’s  UHF  station,  to  the  National 
Broadcasting  Company,  denying  a plea  by 
WGR  Corp.,  Buffalo.  . . . The  annual  in- 
stallation of  Variety  Club  of  Buffalo  will  be 
held  in  the  club’s  Delaware  Avenue  head- 
quarters January  15. 

CHARLOTTE 

Motion  picture  business  snapped  out  of  its 
slump  with  the  advent  of  the  Christmas 
holidays.  Charlotte’s  six  first  run  theatres 
each  came  up  with  a top  attraction  that 
lured  thousands  of  customers.  . . . “Guys  and 
Dolls”  was  at  the  Plaza,  “Artists  and  Mod- 
els” at  the  Carolina,  “Kismet”  at  the  Im- 
perial, “Indian  Tighter”  at  the  Center,  “All 


That  Heaven  Allows”  at  the  Manor  and 
“The  Big  Knife”  at  the  Visulite.  . . . Many 
Carolina  exhibitors  visited  Charlotte  the 
week  before  Christmas,  bringing  gifts  for 
bookers  in  film  exchanges.  . . . The  Char- 
lotte Variety  Club  held  its  annual  Christmas 
party  for  children  Dec.  21  in  the  clubrooms. 
Scott  Lett  played  Santa  Claus  to  the  approx- 
imately 100  children  who  attended. 

CHICAGO 

The  newly  elected  officers  and  crew  of  the 
Variety  Club  of  Illinois  will  be  installed  at 
a gala  party  to  be  held  January  16,  in  the 
Florentine  Room  of  the  Congress  Hotel. 
Jack  Kirsch,  president  of  Allied  Theatres  of 
Illinois,  is  the  new  chief  barker.  . . . Buck 
Stoner  of  Paramount  offices  here  is  vaca- 
tioning in  California.  . . . Ace  Seating  Com- 
pany is  rebuilding  800  seats  in  the  Parkway 
theatre,  where  other  remodeling  and  mod- 
ernization is  currently  in  progress.  Just 
prior  to  starting  the  Parkway  project,  this 
company  repaired  seats  in  the  Evanston  and 
Armitage  theatres.  ...  A group  of  press 
people  from  Milwaukee  and  Minneapolis 
were  brought  here  by  United  Artists  pub- 
licist Wally  Heim  for  a special  showing  of 
“The  Man  With  the  Golden  Arm.”  Otto 
Preminger  returned  to  the  city  to  help  host 
the  visitors.  . . . Ira  Kutok  of  the  Ed  Wolk 
Supply  Company  will  have  to  spend  still 
another  month  in  the  hospital  following  an 
automobile  accident.  He  reports  that  this  is 
a tedious  experience  and  he  would  welcome 
a greeting  or  two  from  friends.  He  is  in  the 
Bethany  Methodist  Hospital,  located  at  5029 
North  Paulina  Street,  Chicago.  . . . Danny 
Newman,  veteran  showman,  has  taken  over 
the  Chelten  theatre  located  at  7945  South 
Exchange  Avenue.  Operations  began  Janu- 
ary 1st,  with  double  feature  programs 
changing  three  times  a week.  Other  changes 
involve  matinees  on  Saturdays  and  Sundays 
and  Monday  evening  opening.  Alvin  Erank, 
who  managed  the  Astor  for  Newman  before 
it  was  torn  down  to  make  room  for  a Loop 
synagogue,  is  the  Chelten  manager.  . . . 
Arthur  Schoenstadt,  head  of  the  Schoen- 
stadt  Circuit,  is  this  year’s  chairman  for  the 
Red  Cross  as  it  pertains  to  those  in  the 
amusement  industry  in  the  Chicago  area. 

CLEVELAND 

“Guys  and  Dolls”  is  reportedly  doing 
phenomenal  business  at  Loew’s  Ohio  theatre 
where  the  SRO  sign  is  out  daily  for  both 
matinee  and  evening  performances.  . . . Rob- 
ert Wile,  secretary  of  the  Independent  Thea- 
tre Owners  of  Ohio,  and  his  wife  were  in 
town  several  days,  during  which  time  Mrs. 
Wile  and  Mrs.  Horace  Adams,  wife  of  the 
ITOO  president,  mapped  the  entertainment 
program  for  the  ladies  attending  the  Feb. 
21-22  National  Allied  Drive-In  convention. 

. . . Word  comes  from  Toledo  that  Marilyn 
Smith,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Martin 
Smith  was  married  December  27  to  Jack 
Born  of  Kalamazoo,  Mich.,  now  serving  in 
the  armed  forces.  . . . Nate  Schultz,  presi- 
dent of  the  Allied  Artists  exchange  here, 
and  his  family  were  vacationing  in  Florida 

(Continued  on  page  32) 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  7.  1956 


29 


Greatest  Show  on  Earth  . . . 


Every  week— everywhere— spectacle  follows  spectacle 
across  the  wide,  wide  screen.  Figures,  action— near  life 
in  size — have  new  "closeness.” 

Street  scenes,  sports,  wonders  of  nature— all  "live” 
and  "breathe”  with  reality. 

New,  changing  technics  of  production,  processing  and 


projection  make  all  this  possible  . . . technics  which  the 
Eastman  Technical  Service  for  Motion  Picture  Film  is  proud 
to  work  with  the  industry  in  solving.  Branches  at  strategic 
centers.  Inquiries  invited. 

Address:  Motion  Picture  Film  Department 

EASTMAN  KODAK  COMPANY,  Rochester  4,  N.  Y. 


East  Coast  Division 

342  Madison  Ave.,  New  York  17,  N.  Y 

Midwest  Division  J 
137  North  Wabash  Ave.,  Chicag^j^lllinois 

West  Coast  Division  \ 

6706  Santa  Monica  Blvd.,  Hollywood  38,  California 


{Continued  front  page  29) 

during  the  school  vacation  period.  . . . Ben 
L.  Ogron.  head  of  Ohio  Theatre  Supply 
Co.,  and  his  family  were  also  in  Florida. . . . 
Cleveland  Motion  Picture  Exhibitors  Asso- 
ciation meets  January  10  to  elect  new  of- 
ficers. . . . M.  B.  Horwitz,  veteran  theatre 
owner  of  45  years,  will  be  honored  by  the 
industry  on  Feb.  20  with  a dinner  in  the 
Hollenden  Hotel  on  the  occasion  of  his  70th 
birthday  anniversary,  which  actually  falls  on 
Feb.  22.  Meyer  Fine,  Nate  Schultz  and  I.  J. 
Schmertz  are  in  charge  of  the  stag  affair. 
. . . Holiday  business,  according  to  reports, 
is  spotty.  Downtown  first  runs  are  happy 
over  attendance,  and  so  are  some  of  the  first 
sub-run  houses,  but  many  out-of-town  ex- 
hibitors report  disappointment,  with  grosses 
lower  than  those  for  last  year.  . . . Abe 
Kramer,  of  Associated  Circuit,  returned  to 
Florida  after  a brief  visit  here  to  attend  the 
company’s  annual  Christmas  party. 

COLUMBUS 

Christmas  week  brought  an  upsurge  of  busi- 
ness with  especially  big  houses  clocked  for 
“Guys  and  Dolls’’  at  RKO  Palace,  “Artists 
and  Models’’  at  Loew’s  Ohio,  “Kismet”  at 
Loew's  Broad  and  “The  African  Lion”  at  the 
World.  “Guys  and  Dolls”  and  “The  African 
Lion”  were  held  for  second  weeks.  . . . Ed- 
ward McGlone,  manager  of  RKO  Palace, 
has  been  suffering  from  an  infected  throat. 
. . . Herman  “Bud”  Kissel,  former  theatre 
editor  of  the  Columbus  Citizen,  suffered  leg 
fractures  and  other  injuries  when  struck  by 
an  automobile  near  his  home.  . . . W.  A. 
Gray,  owner  of  the  Rapids,  Grand  Rapids, 
Ohio,  will  offer  the  theatre  for  sale  at  pub- 
lic auction  Jan.  21.  He  is  retiring  from  ac- 
tive business  because  of  his  health.  He  is 
also  selling  his  household  effects,  wood  cab- 
inet shop  and  tools.  Robert  Wile,  secretary 
of  the  Independent  Theatre  Owners  of  Ohio, 
said  the  Rapids  is  showing  excellent  returns 
and  is  a good  family  proposition.  . . . Nor- 
man Nadel,  theatre  editor  of  the  Citizen, 
will  act  as  guide  on  three  two-week  aerial 
theatre  tours  to  London,  Paris  and  Nice  next 
summer.  The  tours  are  sponsored  by  the 
Citizen. 

DENVER 

Directors  of  Allied  Rocky  Mountain  Inde- 
pendent Theatres  will  hold  their  winter 
meeting  Jan.  17  at  the  Denver  headquarters. 
Particularly  under  discussion  will  be  the 
high  prices  of  films  and  the  shortage  of 
product.  All  members  are  urged  to  attend. 

. . . J.  M.  F.  Dubois,  freelance  newsreel 
cameraman,  was  one  of  those  who  received  a 
print  of  one  of  President  Eisenhower’s  paint- 
ings, and  a greeting,  from  the  President,  for 
Christmas.  . . . Marvin  Goldfarb,  Buena 
Vista  district  manager,  to  Kansas  City  and 
St.  Louis  on  a sales  trip.  . . . Jim  Ricketts, 
Paramount  branch  manager,  and  salesmen 
John  Thomas  and  Wm.  Peregrine  are  on 
vacation.  . . . Carl  Mock,  theatre  appliance 
salesman,  back  from  a five-week  Mexico 
vacation.  . . . James  Ecker,  Republic  branch 
manager,  Salt  Lake  City,  home  to  Denver 
for  the  holidays.  . . . Ed  Maple,  city  council- 
man, loaned  the  Gem  to  the  Salvation  Army 
for  a Christmas  party. 

DES  MOINES 

The  Anita  theatre  at  Anita  has  been  re- 
opened after  vigorous  endorsement  by  the 
community,  spearheaded  by  the  Chamber  of 


Commerce.  The  house  had  been  closed  for 
just  one  week.  Bill  Proctor,  owner,  said  he 
had  closed  the  Anita  because  of  poor  patron- 
age. He  added  he  is  happy  to  reopen  with 
the  assurance  of  backing  by  the  entire  com- 
munity. . . . Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stephen  A.  Oelle- 
rich  were  paid  $23,500  for  their  one-fourth 
interest  in  the  Starlite  drive-in  theatre  at 
Waterloo,  according  to  records  in  the  county 
recorder’s  office.  Deeds  involved  show  that 
the  Starlite  Drive-In  Theatre  Co.  of  Des 
Moines  is  now  owner  of  the  theatre.  Myron 
Blank  is  president  of  the  company  which 
was  formed  to  operate  the  Starlite.  Another 
deed  on  file  shows  the  transfer  of  the  Central 
States  Theatre  Corp.,  interest  in  the  Starlite 
drive-in  theatre  of  Waterloo  to  the  Starlite 
Drive-In  Theatre  Co.  of  Des  Moines  at  a 
consideration  of  $50,500.  Blank  is  president 
of  Central  States.  . . . Sam  Watson,  own- 
er of  the  Watson  theatre  at  Graettinger,  has 
sold  his  theatre  equipment  to  George  Basta 
of  Alexandria,  Minn.  Possession  date  is 
Mar.  1.  Watson  announced  that  he,  in  turn, 
had  purchased  a 240-acre  farm  from  Basta. 
Watson,  who  owns  land,  houses  and  an 
apartment  house  in  Graettinger,  said  he  will 
continue  to  maintain  an  office  there  and  will 
take  part  in  community  affairs.  . . . The 
Avery  theatre  at  Garner  has  been  reopened 
by  Otto  Jass,  who  is  new  to  the  community. 
. . . The  Star  theatre  in  Ute  closed  with  the 
New  Year’s  Day  showing.  . . . Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Rollin  Stonebrook  and  daughter,  Susan,  are 
newcomers  to  Cherokee;  their  former  home 
is  Evanston,  111.  Stonebrook  is  the  new 
manager  of  Cherokee’s  Arrow  theatre.  . . . 
One  of  the  fine  Christmas  displays  in  Iowa 
was  at  the  drive-in  theatre  west  of  Burling- 
ton where  manager  Paul  Strennen  set  up  a 
candle  display.  A total  of  400  six-inch  can- 
dles were  included  and  were  visible  in  deco- 
rative patterns  from  Highway  80,  near  the 
theatre. 

DETROIT 

Walter  Mitchell,  suspect  in  the  looting  of 
the  Madison  safe  December  17,  was  cap- 
tured in  El  Paso.  Mitchell,  who  had  been 
assistant  manager  eight  days,  was  stopped 
by  border  guards  as  he  attempted  to  cross 
into  Mexico.  . . . Daylight  Masonic  Lodge 
has  elected  Milton  Vine  worshipful  master. 
Bill  Green  and  H.  Owen  Blough  of  Music 
Hall  were  the  election  committee’s  vote- 
counters.  . . . L & L Concessions  will  supply 
the  William  Olekson  theatres  in  Flint.  . . . 
TV’s  Ladies  Day  prize  of  a flying  trip  to 
Florida  went  to  Rozella  Mayes,  Warners 
biller.  . . . George  Hickox,  Jr.,  formerly  of 
the  Echo,  is  operating  the  Stone.  . . . Mickey 
Zide  has  returned  from  the  service  to  rejoin 
Allied  Films.  . . . Fred  Devantier  has  been 
elected  president  of  lATSE  Local  735, 
southeastern  Michigan  representative.  . . . 
A1  Champagne  has  been  re-elected  business 
agent  of  lATSE  Local  F25  representing 
front  office  employes  in  local  exchanges.  . . . 
100  fair  managers,  meeting  in  Detroit,  will 
see  “Cinerama  Holiday”  with  the  fair  se- 
quence pushed  to  the  front  of  the  film  in 
their  honor. 

HARTFORD 

The  boost  in  adult  admission  prices  at  two 
Hartford  Theatre  Circuit  deluxe  suburban 
houses,  the  Central,  West  Hartford,  and 
Colonial,  Hartford,  seems  to  be  developing 
into  a regional  trend.  The  Burnside  theatre, 
East  Hartford,  has  increased  its  adult  ad- 
mission from  65  to  70  cents.  Latter  figure  is 


new  charge  at  the  Central  and  Colonial. 
Other  suburban  operators  are  understood 
planning  comparable  changes.  . . . William 
Daugherty  of  the  Lockwood  & Gordon  Con- 
necticut Theatres  has  been  in  Mexico  City 
on  a vacation.  . . . Norm  Levinson,  MGM 
press  representative  in  Minneapolis,  has  re- 
turned there  from  Hartford,  where  he  visited 
over  the  holidays.  . . . Jack  Bronstein,  presi- 
dent, Bronstein  Drive-In  Enterprises,  has 
returned  here  from  Scranton,  Pa.,  and  Tren- 
ton, N.  J.  The  Bronstein  interests  are  build- 
ing 1,000-car  drive-in  theatres  in  both  cities, 
with  early  spring  openings  planned.  . . . 
Lockwood  & Gordon  Theatres  are  planning 
a complete  remodeling  job  at  the  Strand, 
Winsted,  Conn.,  which  was  closed  following 
last  summer’s  floods.  Lou  Gordon,  circuit 
partner,  anticipates  an  early  spring  reopen- 
ing of  the  theatre,  the  only  conventional, 
four-wall  house  in  that  city. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

The  old  year  ended  and  the  new  year 
opened  with  a bang  at  first  run  theatres 
here.  The  long  weekend  boosted  all  new 
attractions  to  high  grosses.  “Guys  and 
Dolls”  looks  set  for  an  indefinite  run  at 
Keith’s.  . . . George  Marks,  operator  of  the 
Grove  at  Beech  Grove,  has  started  a “Dime 
Night”  experiment,  for  both  children  and 
adults,  every  Wednesday  and  Thursday,  be- 
ginning Jan.  4.  . . . Robert  L.  Jackson  has 
been  named  manager  of  Alliance’s  Embassy 
at  Fort  Wayne,  to  succeed  M.  J.  Kahn,  who 
resigned.  Don  Hammer  succeeds  Jackson  as 
manager  of  the  Jefferson  there.  . . . Ben 
Fuller  has  installed  new  seats  at  the  Grand 
in  Union  City.  . . . Chief  barker  Bob  Jones 
announces  the  Variety  Club’s  Heart  Fund 
henceforth  will  be  known  as  the  Variety 
Club  Charities,  to  avoid  confusion  with  the 
American  Heart  Association  drive.  . . . 
Ralph  Banghart,  RKO  publicist,  was  here 
last  week  setting  up  plans  for  the  state  pre- 
miere of  “Glory,”  with  Margaret  O’Brien 
and  Walter  Brennan  in  attendance,  at  the 
Circle  Jan.  13. 

JACKSONVILLE 

The  biggest  array  of  midnight  shows  in 
the  city’s  history  was  provided  on  New 
Year’s  Eve  by  indoor  and  drive-in  theatres 
to  capitalize  on  the  post-Christmas  upsurge 
of  business  at  box  offices  and  to  accommo- 
date many  thousands  of  visitors  here  to 
attend  the  week-long  Gatorama  festivities, 
climaxed  by  the  Auburn-Vanderbilt  foot- 
ball game  at  the  Gator  Bowl.  . . . Carroll 
Ogburn,  Warner  executive  from  Atlanta, 
was  here  over  the  holidays  on  company 
business.  . . . T.  P.  Tidwell,  20th-Fox  branch 
manager,  returned  from  a vacation  in  Texas 
and  soon  left  for  a national  sales  meeting  in 
New  York.  . . . Enjoying  a New  Year’s 
holiday  in  New  York  was  Jack  Wiener, 
MGM  publicist.  . . . Harvey  Reinstein, 
Buena  Vista  salesman,  was  among  those 
going  to  the  Orange  Bowl  game  in  Miami 
between  Oklahoma  and  Maryland.  . . . C.  T. 
Jordan  opened  the  new  Howco  Exchange  at 
122  East  Bay  Street  and  held  an  open-house 
party  for  Film  Row  bookers  a few  days 
later.  . . . Bob  Greenleaf,  young  manager 
of  the  local  Brentwood  theatre,  won  the  $500 
first  prize  in  Florida  State  Theatres’  candy 
carnival  contest  that  lasted  eight  weeks.  . . . 
WOMPI  members  were  planning  a St.  Val- 
entine’s Day  dance,  with  profits  being  ear- 
marked for  charity.  . . . Industry  visitors 

{Continued  on  opposite  page) 


32 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


{Continued  from  opposite  page) 

were  Billy  Knight,  Tampa;  George  Trenaris, 
DeLand ; J.  F.  Ramsey  and  Aubrey  Findley, 
Alma.  Ga.;  and  Mrs.  S.  F.  Summerlin, 
Homerville,  Ga.  . . . Arv  Rothschild,  general 
manager  of  NTK,  has  started  a new  series 
of  Friday  night  stage  talent  shows  at  the 
Negro-patronage  Roosevelt  theatre. 

LOS  ANGELES 

\'^acationing  here  was  Bill  Shartin,  Port- 
land-Seattle  branch  manager  for  Favorite 
Films.  . . . The  sudden  passing  of  Hugh 
Bruen.  prominent  Whittier  exhibitor, 
shocked  and  saddened  Film  Row.  . . . Izzy 
Berman,  of  Aladdin  Enterprises,  has  been 
on  jury  duty  for  the  past  month.  . . . Back 
from  a sojourn  in  the  Honolulu  sun  were 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving  Levin  of  Filmakers. 
. . . Lloyd  Ownbey,  vice-president  of  Nation- 
al Theatre  Supply,  checked  in  from  a swing 
around  the  territory.  . . . Owen  Sherlock, 
formerly  a theatre  manager  in  Holbrook, 
Ariz.,  has  taken  over  the  management  of  the 
Arlington  theatre  in  Arlington,  succeeding 
Gene  O’Keefe.  The  latter  has  been  trans- 
ferred to  the  home  office  of  the  Gamble- 
O’Keefe  circuit  here  after  two  years  in  Ar- 
lington. ...  In  the  hospital  for  surgery  is 
Morry  Sudman,  20th  Century-Fox  branch 
manager.  . . . Also  on  the  sick  list  was  Tom 
Muchmore,  who  operates  theatres  in  Los 
Angeles  and  also  Canoga  Park.  . . . Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Bill  Srere  and  their  daughter  checked 
out  for  New  York  to  spend  the  holidays. . . . 
Mrs.  Barry  Messer,  daughter  of  Jules  Gere- 
lick,  U-I  salesman,  came  in  from  Denver  to 
visit  her  parents  over  the  holiday  season.  . . . 
Visiting  here  from  Omaha  is  Mrs.  Paul 
Fine,  whose  husband  is  president  of  West- 
ern Theatre  Supply  there. 

MEMPHtS 

Memphis  should  abolish  its  Censor  Board 
permanently.  Mayor  Edmund  Orgill’s  Citi- 
zens Committee  has  recommended  to  the  new 
mayor  and  City  Commission,  which  took 
office  Jan.  2.  . . . The  recommendation  has 
been  referred  to  the  city  legal  staff  to  see 
if  any  city  ordinances  need  changing  in  case 
the  iMayor  and  Commissioners  decide  to 
adopt  it.  . . . Since  Jan.  1 Memphis  has  been 
without  a censorship  board  and  it  appears 
that  this  will  become  permanent.  . . . “Guys 
and  Dolls.”  MGM,  took  Memphis  by  storm 
and  the  first  week  at  Malco  brought  three 
times  average  attendance.  Otherwise  Christ- 
mas-New Year’s  attendance  was  not  im- 
proved at  ^Memphis  first  runs. 

MIAMI 

Over  350,000  celebrants  joined  the  holiday 
throngs  on  New  Year’s  Eve  to  view  the 
three-hour  King  Orange  Jamboree  annual 
parade  with  more  than  1,000  girls  decorating 
the  50  floats  and  marching  in  the  band  units. 
Many  of  the  theatres  ran  extra  midnight 
shows  and  some  offered  additional  film  fare 
as  a lure  for  the  patrons  to  ring  in  the  new 
at  the  theatre.  . . . TV’s  Phil  Silvers  is  a 
holiday  guest  at  the  Roney  Plaza.  . . . Elor- 
ida  representatives  Jerry  Bell  and  Gene 
Terlecki  will  be  vending  TV  films  for  Good- 
man Productions,  which  is  scheduled  to  film 
the  Jerry  Lester  show,  “Be  My  Guest.”  . . . 
The  Palm  Beach  Gold  Coast  was  host  to 
Joan  Fontaine  and  her  husband,  film  pro- 
ducer Collver  Young,  at  the  La  Coquille  up 
there.  . . . Now  on  the  other  side  of  the  stage 
is  Jay  Rayvid,  formerly  assistant  at  the  Lin- 


coln theatre,  who  is  rehearsing  in  the  show 
“Bar  Kochba,”  due  for  a February  presen- 
tation. . . . Former  manager  of  the  Miami, 
Jack  McKinnon,  now  a Major  with  the  Air 
Force  in  Japan,  is  true  to  his  training,  and 
arranging  a Far  East  premiere  of  the 
“McConnell  Story”  at  the  1,500  seat  theatre 
under  his  command  in  Special  Services. 

MILWAUKEE 

Bob  Gross,  district  manager  for  Smith 
Management  Co.,  won  first  prize  in  their 
recent  district  managers  payroll  contest.  . . . 
Louise  Bergtold,  Westby  theatre,  Westby, 
Wis.,  is  a proud  grandmother.  Her  daughter, 
Mrs.  Robert  Drew,  gave  birth  to  a baby 
boy,  Thomas  Anthony,  December  18  in  New 
York.  Mrs.  Bergtold’s  son-in-law,  Robert 
Drew,  is  at  present  appearing  in  a play  star- 
ring Arthur  Kennedy  in  Washington,  D.  C. 
. . . Harold  Pearson,  executive  secretary  of 
Wisconsin  Allied,  is  vacationing  in  northern 
Wisconsin.  . . . Erv  dumb  ran  a full  page, 
colored  ad  in  Sunday’s  paper  advertising 
“Guys  and  Dolls.”  . . . For  the  first  time  in 
twelve  years  an  electric  organ  is  again  fea- 
tured in  a Milwaukee  theatre.  Twice  nightly, 
during  the  run  of  “Guys  and  Dolls”  at  the 
Riverside  theatre,  the  Beckers  are  featured 
on  the  electric  organ  and  piano. 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Minnesota  Amusement  Co.  is  selling  its 
Garrick,  first  run  house,  at  Duluth,  Minn., 
to  a group  of  Duluth  businessmen  and  the 
house  will  be  converted  into  a parking  ramp. 
The  house  is  now  in  operation  and  MACO 
will  continue  to  run  it  for  several  months. 
The  circuit  also  operates  the  Norshor  and 
the  Lyric  in  Duluth.  . . . Gerald  Hillary  is 
the  new  assistant  manager  at  the  RKO 
Orpheum,  St.  Paul,  replacing  James  Feney, 
resigned.  . . . J.  T.  McBride,  Paramount 
branch  manager,  spent  the  Christmas  week- 
end in  St.  Louis.  . . . Donna  Stinson,  book- 
ing stenographer  at  Paramount,  is  engaged 
to  Flying  Officer  Robert  Smith  of  Victoria, 
British  Columbia.  . . . Charlotte  Silverman, 
bookers’  clerk  at  MGM,  celebrated  the  New 
Year  in  Chicago.  . . . Beverly  Blogett  is 
the  new  billing  clerk  at  Allied  Artists,  and 
Kathy  Berns  is  the  new  bookers  stenogra- 
pher at  20th-Fox.  . . . Chick  Evens,  20th- 
Fox  Midwest  exploiteer,  was  in  for  “The 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts”  at  the  State  and 
for  the  Fox  holiday  party  at  Culbertson’s 
cafe.  . . . Sam  Gorelick,  RKO  district  man- 
ager was  in  on  routine  business. 

NEW  ORLEANS 

Jack  O’Quinn,  head  of  Joy-Oke  Theatres, 
operating  indoor  theatres  in  Gueydan,  Kap- 
lan and  Welsh,  La.,  and  the  individually 
owned  Echo  drive-in.  New  Iberia,  La.  an- 
nounced that  he  has  purchased  E.  Elias 
interest  in  the  indoor  Essanee  and  Colonial 
in  the  latter  city.  Mrs.  Julia  Scharf  owns 
the  other  half  interest.  Mrs.  Scharf  is  among 
the  state’s  pioneers  in  the  field  of  exhibition 
and  O’Quinn’s  experience  dates  back  about 
a quarter  of  a century.  . . . Herman  and 
Ered  Beiersdorf,  Dallas  independent  ex- 
change operators,  were  here  to  confer  with 
Harold  “Babe”  Cohen,  Bob  Saloy  and  Roy 
Nicaud  regarding  the  newly  formed  distri- 
bution and  producing  company.  Majestic 
Pictures,  in  which  the  five  are  associated. 

. . . Ideal  weather  and  the  influx  of  early 
arrivals  for  the  New  Year’s  Sugar  Bowl 
Game  and  the  usual  run  of  tourists,  sparked 


by  the  number  of  top  attractions,  has  boosted 
attendance  in  all  of  the  first  run  situations 
here.  Several  executives  commented  that 
the  box  office  receipts  surpassed  that  of 
the  same  period  last  year.  . . . Exhibitors’ 
Cooperative  Service  have  taken  possession 
of  their  new  booking  quarters  on  3rd  floor 
in  the  Film  Exchange  Building  on  Liberty 
St.  They  were  formerly  located  in  the  War- 
wick. . . . Ed  Ortte  closed  the  Hi  Way 
drive-in  for  a short,  but  indefinite  period. 
...  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Caldwell,  Bernice, 
La.,  owners  of  the  Kay,  Earmersville,  La., 
reopened  the  latter  which  has  been  closed 
for  several  months. 

OKLAHOMA  CITY 

“The  African  Lion”  was  showing  at  sev- 
eral suburban  theatres  during  the  Christ- 
mas holidays.  . . . The  Will  Rogers  thea- 
tre had  a New  Year’s  Eve  “Watch  Party” 
Dec.  31.  . . . The  Harber  and  Tower  thea- 
tres, scheduled  preview  films  for  Dec.  31. 
. . . The  newest  films  will  be  shown  on  the 
screen  of  the  new  Poncan  theatre,  Ponca 
City,  Okla.,  date-for-date  or  ahead  of  lead- 
ing theatres  in  the  largest  cities  in  Okla- 
homa, manager  Don  R.  Hall,  of  Video  The- 
atres, reports.  New  booking  contracts  have 
been  entered  into  as  a part  of  the  renovation 
of  the  theatre. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Bradford  K.  Cross,  sales  manager  for  the 
Princeton  Film  Center,  joins  the  Lavenson 
Bureau  of  Advertising  here  as  supervisor 
of  the  account  service  department.  . . . Dr. 
Bernard  Kahn,  for  many  years  house  physi- 
cian for  the  Stanley  Warner  Theatres  here, 
has  left  for  a trip  to  South  Africa.  ...  A 
testimonial  dinner  will  be  given  on  Jan.  9 
at  the  Bellevue-Stratford  Hotel  by  the  Phil- 
delphia  Variety  Club,  Tent  No.  13,  for 
Louis  J.  Goffman,  retiring  Chief  Barker, 
and  Maxwell  Gillis,  the  newly-elected  Chief 
Barker.  . . . Ted  Schlanger,  zone  manager 
for  the  Stanley  Warner  Theatres,  became  a 
grandfather  with  the  birth  of  a son  to  his 
son,  Claude  Schlanger,  who  is  also  identified 
with  theatre  exhibition.  . . . Tri-States  Buy- 
ing and  Booking  Service  here  is  now  han- 
dling the  Garden  drive-in,  Hunlock  Creek, 
Pa.,  whose  owner,  Ted  Cragle,  died  last  week. 

. . . Ed  Caffrey,  manager  of  the  Riviera, 
Scranton,  Pa.,  became  the  father  of  a little 
girl  born  last  week.  . . . Eugene  Deeter  has 
purchased  the  lease  and  other  interests  of 
Harry  Eriedland  in  the  Majestic,  Mt.  Penn 
Borough  outside  of  Reading,  Pa.,  and  has 
closed  it  temporarily.  Deeter,  who  was  man- 
ager of  the  Plaza  in  Reading,  will  reopen 
after  alterations  with  former  Loew’s  man- 
ager Larry  Levy  as  house  manager.  Fried- 
land  and  his  wife  have  gone  to  Los  Angeles. 

. . . The  local  Variety  Club,  Tent  No.  13, 
presented  its  Heart  Award  to  Stan  Lee 
Broza,  director  of  the  radio  and  TV  “Chil- 
dren’s Hour”  for  the  past  28  years  for  the 
work  he  has  done  in  helping  talented  chil- 
dren on  their  way  to  success.  . . . With  the 
settlement  of  the  eight-month-old  transit 
strike  in  Scranton,  Pa.,  there  has  been  a 
marked  improvement  in  movie  business. 

PORTLAND 

Russ  Brown,  National  Theatres  execu- 
tive, was  up  from  Los  Angeles  for  a week’s 
vacation.  This  is  his  home  town.  . . . Dick 
Newton,  Paramount  theatre  manager,  is 

(Continued  on  following  page) 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


33 


Big 

Big 

Big 

biggest 

picture 

ever 

filmed 

by 

RKO 


THE 

CONQUEROR 


{Coutinucd  from  preceding  page) 

back  from  a short  trip  to  Seattle.  . . . Marty 
Foster,  Guild  theatre  manager,  was  in  New 
York  on  a business  trip.  His  400-seat  Guild 
is  getting  a $40,000  facelifting  job,  includ- 
ing Cinema  Scope.  . . . Credit  Broadway  the- 
atre manager  Herb  Royster  with  doing  a 
terrific  promotion  job  on  “Guys  and  Dolls.” 
He  worked  hard  and  the  film  has  completed 
a week  with  the  SRO  sign  out.  . . . Mrs. 
J.  J.  Parker  was  in  California  on  business 
and  to  visit  her  family.  . . . Journal  drama 
editor  Arnold  Marks  has  returned  from  a 
week’s  business  trip  to  Los  Angeles.  . . . 
Charles  Schramm,  Astoria  City  manager  for 
J.  J.  Parker  Theatres,  was  in  town  for  a 
few  days.  . . . First  run  business  is  great 
after  having  been  in  the  doldrums  for  the 
past  month. 

PROVIDENCE 

The  New  England  premiere  of  “The  Rains 
of  Ranchipur”  at  the  Majestic  auspiciously 
ushered  in  the  holiday  season.  Excellent 
film  fare  attracted  generous  patronage  at 
most  first  run.  "Artists  and  Models”  held 
the  spotlight  at  the  Strand,  while  “Kismet” 
was  the  Christmas  offering  at  Loew’s  State. 
...  A minor  sleet  storm,  added  to  the  hard- 
packed  snow  already  on  the  ground,  made 
driving  hazardous,  possibly  deterring  some 
moviegoers,  but  considering  the  season  not 
too  many  complaints  were  voiced.  ...  In 
a scathing  letter  to  the  editor  of  the  Journal- 
Bulletin,  a club-woman  recently  charged 
that  Providence  theatres  were  using  “re- 
pulsive” advertisements,  and  that,  in  her 
opinion,  during  the  recent  school-holidays, 
“there  was  not  a movie  showing  that  was 
fit  for  children  to  see.”  . . . Work  on  the 
proposed  new  studios  of  WJAR-TV,  sched- 
uled for  the  east  side,  has  been  delayed  due 
to  difficulties  in  clearing  the  title.  A hill 
may  have  to  lie  introduced  in  the  Genera! 
Assembly  to  permit  sale  of  the  land. 

PITTSBURGH 

The  Penn  gets  “The  Man  With  the  Gold- 
en Arm”  Jan.  20,  following  “Ransom.”  . . . 
The  Stanley  has  been  added  to  the  global 
premiere  list  of  “Helen  of  Troy”  on  Jan. 
26.  . . . “The  Sheep  Has  Five  Legs”  came 
mighty  close  to  breaking  the  Guild  theatre 
attendance  record  held  by  “Camille.”  . . . 
Buster  Crabbe  has  been  added  to  the  list  of 
stars  for  the  Variety  Club’s  Jan.  14  telethon 
from  Syria  Mosque  for  the  Roselia  Maternity 
Hospital.  Harold  Cohen,  the  Post-Gazette 
film  critic,  is  telethon  chairman.  . . . The 
Squirrel  Hill  will  follow  “African  Lion” 
with  “The  Man  Who  Loved  Redheads.”  . . . 
Actor  Don  Taylor,  a native  of  this  district, 
home  for  a few  days  to  see  the  folks.  . . . 
“There's  Always  Tomorrow”  has  been  set 
for  the  Fulton  on  Jan.  13,  the  same  day 
that  the  .Stanley  gets  “At  Gunpoint.”  Fred 
MacMurray,  who  stars  in  both  pictures,  will 
be  here  that  day  with  his  wife,  June  Haver. 

. . . Press  critic  Kap  Monahan’s  daughter, 
Kathleen,  back  to  New  York  after  a week 
here  with  her  dad  and  brother. 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

'I'he  Redwoofl  theatres  of  flood  isolated 
Eureka.  Cal.,  are  showing  films  sent  in  and 
returned  by  chartered  planes.  George  Mann, 
owner  of  the  circuit,  teamed  with  the  Pa- 
cific Telephone  and  Telegraph  Co.,  and  the 
Pacific  Gas  and  Electric  Co.,  as  both  utilities 


were  sending  replacement  equipment  into  the 
area,  to  supply  prints  to  the  theatres  by  air- 
lift. Telephone  and  power  lines,  highways 
and  railroads  were  washed  out  in  Northern 
California’s  worst  floods.  . . . South  of 
Eureka,  J.  J.  Perry’s  Klamath  theatre, 
Klamath,  and  Bob  Davis’  Mirabelle  theatre, 
W'eott,  were  damaged  when  the  flooding 
Klamath  River  forced  evacuation  of  these 
towns.  . . . Still  under  water  in  the  foothills 
of  the  Sierras  is  the  Yuba  City  drive-in.  The 
town  was  evacuated  and  twice  flooded  by 
the  Feather  River.  Reports  of  damage  in 
other  areas  include  the  Majestic  theatre, 
Reno;  the  Millbrae  theatre,  Alillbrae  on  the 
Peninsula,  and  the  Del  Mar  theatre,  Santa 
Cruz.  Flooded  were  the  KaV'on  drive-in, 
Napa;  the  Concord  drive-in.  Concord;  the 
Marin  Motor-in,  San  Rafael,  and  the  Palo 
Alto  drive-in,  Palo  Alto.  The  extent  of  the 
damage  cannot  yet  be  estimated.  . . . “Guys 
and  Dolls”  is  breaking  records  of  10  years' 
standing  at  the  Stagedoor  theatre,  each  week. 

. . . William  Thedford,  division  manager. 
Fox  West  Coast,  held  an  open  house  for  the 
exchange  managers  and  bookers  in  the  area. 

VANCOUVER 

“Guys  and  Dolls,”  at  increased  prices, 
topped  other  attractions  by  a big  margin. 
Most  theatres  had  over-average  business. . . . 
A one-armed  bandit  robbed  the  Capitol  of 
$125  at  gunpoint  just  after  midnight  at  the 
midnight  show.  . . . The  east-side  Avon 
theatre,  dark  for  the  past  two  years,  was 
sold  by  State  Theatres,  Ltd.,  to  a syndicate 
of  Chinese  headed  by  Quon  Wong,  a local 
lawyer.  Price  is  said  to  be  around  $80,000. 
The  theatre,  built  in  1906,  is  the  former 
Pantage  Circuit  house.  . . . Exhibitors  here 
aren’t  of  one  mind  about  the  Christmas  prod- 
uct. .Some  think  it  was  fine.  Others  feel  that 
it  was  far  from  strong.  . . . Dave  Smith, 
service  man  for  Perkins  Electric,  resigned  to 
join  Southern  Freightways  in  the  traffic  de- 
partment. . . . Jack  McNicol,  manager  of  the 
Columbia  at  New  Westminster,  led  all  Cana- 
dian theatres  in  Theatre  Confections’  10th 
anniversary  contest.  He  won  $325  for  high- 
est percentage  of  increase  in  concession 
sales  in  FPC  theatres.  Other  British  Colum- 
bia winners  were  Bill  Harper  of  Paramount, 
Kelowna,  and  Walter  Bennett  of  the  Capitol, 
Vernon.  . . . Bryan  Joy,  a projectionist  for 
the  past  20  years  here,  last  at  the  Ridge,  has 
quit  show  business  and  is  moving  with  his 
family  to  Las  Vegas. 

WASHINGTON 

Harriet  Lowry,  daughter  of  the  \'ariety 
Club  chaplain.  Dr.  Charles  W.  Lowry,  was 
married  December  27,  to  James  Kimball 
King.  . . . Robert  M.  Grace,  Paramount 
office  manager,  and  Hugo  Johnson.  Para- 
mount News,  were  inducted  into  the  com- 
pany’s 25  Year  Club.  . . . The  following 
officers  and  board  members  will  be  installed 
by  the  Variety  Club  January  9:  chief  barker, 
Orville  Crouch ; first  assistant  chief  barker. 
Marvin  Goldman ; second  assistant  chief 
barker,  Hirsh  de  La  Viez ; property  master, 
George  Nathan ; dough  guy,  Sam  Galanty ; 
plus  J.  E.  Fontaine,  George  A.  Crouch, 
Jake  Flax,  Nathan  D.  Golden,  Clark  Davis, 
and  Sidney  Cooper.  . . . Four  downtown 
houses  are  doing  so  well  with  current  bills, 
that  no  changes  were  contemplated  for  the 
New  Year’s  Eve  crowds.  The  pictures  are : 
“Guys  and  Dolls,”  “Desperate  Hours,” 
“Artists  and  Models”  and  “Trouble  with 
Harry.” 


34 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


FILM  BUYERS  RATING 


Film  buyers  of  independent  circuits  in  the  U.  S.  rate  current 
product  on  the  basis  of  its  performance  in  their  theatres.  Tins 
report  covers  115  attractions,  4,470  playdates. 

Titles  run  alphabetically.  Numerals  refer  to  the  number  of  en- 
gagements on  each  attraction  reported.  The  tabulation  is  cumula- 
tive. Dagger  (f)  denotes  attractions  published  for  the  first  time. 
Asterisk  ('"  ) indicates  attractions  which  are  listed  for  the  last  time. 

EX  means  Excellent;  AA — Above  Average;  AY — Average; 
BA — Below  Average;  PR — Poor. 


EX  AA  AV  BA  PR 


A & C Meet  the  Mummy  (U-l) 
Ain't  Misbehavin'  (U-l)  .. 


4 13  8 I 

3 27  14  2 


fBig  Knife  (U.A.)  

*Blackboard  Jungle  (MGMj  . 

Blood  Alley  (W.B.)  

Bring  Your  Smile  Along  (Col.) 
Bullet  for  Joey.  A (U.A.)  . . . . 


27 


40 

6 


I 

7 

15 

3 

3 


4 

I I 
I 

5 


I 

10 

5 


Cell  2455,  Death  Row  (Col.) 

Chicago  Syndicate  (Col.)  

Cobweb,  The  (MGM)  

Count  Three  and  Pray  (Col.) 

Creature  With  the  Atom  Brain  (Col.) 
Cult  of  the  Cobra  (U-l) 


3 14  8 - 

- 2 6 6 

6 19  15  8 

4 10  5 I 

13  5 6 I 

2 2 5 2 


Daddy  Long  Legs  (20th-Fox) 

Dam  Busters  (W.B.)  

Davy  Crockett  (B.V.)  

Desert  Sands  (U.A.)  

Desperate  Hours,  The  (Par.) 


I 17  28  8 7 

- I 9 2 4 

10  36  35  8 I 

4 5 11 

- - I 4 9 


End  of  the  Affair  (Col.)  

Eternal  Sea,  The  (Rep.)  

Far  Horizons  (Par.)  

Female  on  the  Beach  (U-l)  

Five  Against  the  House  (Col.)  

Footsteps  in  the  Fog  (Col.)  

Foxfire  (U-l)  

Francis  in  the  Navy  (U-l)  

Gentlemen  Marry  Brunettes  (U.A.)  

Girl  in  the  Red  Velvet  Swing,  The  (20th-Fox) 

Girl  Rush,  The  (Par.)  

Good  Morning,  Miss  Dove  (20th-Fox)  . 

Hell's  Island  (Par.)  

House  of  Bamboo  (20th-Fox) 

How  to  Be  Very,  Very  Popular  (20th-Fox)  . 

I Am  a Camera  (D.C.A.)  

I Died  1,000  Times  (W.B.)  

flllegal  (W.B.)  

Interrupted  Melody  (MGM)  

It  Came  from  Beneath  the  Sea  (Col.) 

It's  Always  Fair  Weather  (MGM) 

Jump  Into  Hell  (W.B.)  

Kentuckian,  The  (U.A.)  

King's  Thief,  The  (MGM)  

Kiss  Me  Deadly  (U.A.)  

Kiss  of  Fire  (U-l)  

Lady  and  the  Tramp  (B.V.)  

Lady  Godiva  (U-l)  

Land  of  the  Pharaohs  (W.B.)  

Las  Vegas  Shakedown  (A.A.)  

Last  Command,  The  (Rep.)  

Left  Hand  of  God,  The  (20th-Fox) 


I 


7 


I 


29 


2 

3 

14 

12 

7 

14 

17 

9 

1 

33 

13 

7 

3 

28 

14 

8 

_ 

12 

4 

3 

_ 

4 

2 

4 

20 

24 

14 

3 

1 1 

28 

1 1 

1 

2 

15 

7 

13 

1 

1 1 

14 

17 

- 

2 

19 

18 

8 

1 

3 

3 

_ 

13 

1 1 

12 

19 

23 

15 

17 

5 

39 

10 

13 

2 

_ 

_ 

4 

- 

2 

L 

4 

1 

7 

0 

16 

22 

10 

21 

9 

6 

3 

1 

13 

21 

25 

2 

5 

5 

- 

24 

19 

9 

5 

- 

7 

1 1 

8 

- 

6 

3 

15 

1 

2 

1 1 

3 

27 

23 

3 

2 

- 

2 

5 

3 

3 

16 

23 

14 

- 

3 

2 

- 

- 

6 

8 

12 

35 

17 

5 

4 

Looters,  The  (U-l)  

Love  Is  a Many-Splendored  Thing  (20th-Fox)  . 

Love  Me  or  Leave  Me  (MGM)  

Lucy  Gallant  (Par.)  

Magnificent  Matador  (20th-Fox)  

Man  Alone,  A (Rep.)  , . 

Man  from  Bitter  Ridge  (U-l) 

Man  from  Laramie  (Col.) 

*Man  Without  a Star  (U-l)  . 

(Man  With  the  Gun  (U.A.) 

Marty  (U.A.)  

McConnell  Story,  The  (W.B.) 

Mister  Roberts  (W.B.)  

Moonfleet  (MGM)  

My  Sister  Eileen  (Col.)  

Naked  Street  (U.A.)  

Night  Holds  Terror,  The  (Col.) 

Night  of  the  Hunter  (U.A.)  

Not  As  a Stranger  (U.A.)  

One  Desire  (U-l)  

Pearl  of  the  South  Pacific  (RKO) 

Pete  Kelly's  Blues  (W.B.)  

Phenix  City  (A.A.)  

Private  War  of  Major  Benson  (U-l) 

Prize  of  Gold,  A (Col.)  

Prodigal,  The  (MGM)  

Purple  Mask  ( U-l ) 

Queen  Bee  (Col.)  

Quentin  Durward  (MGM)  

Rebel  Without  a Cause  (W.B.) 

Revenge  of  the  Creature  (U-l) 

Road  to  Denver  (Rep.)  

Robber's  Roost  (U.A.)  

Santa  Fe  Passage  (Rep.)  

Scarlet  Coat  (MGM)  

Sea  Chase,  The  (W.B.)  

*Seminole  Uprising  (Col.)  . 

Seven  Cities  of  Gold  (20th-Fox) 

Seven  Little  Foys  (Par.)  

Seven  Year  Itch  (20th-Fox)  

Shrike,  The  (U-l) 

Sincerely  Yours  (W.B.)  

Soldier  of  Fortune  (20th-Fox)  

Son  of  Sinbad  (RKO)  

Strange  Lady  in  Town  (W.B.) 

Strategic  Air  Command  (Par.)  

Summertime  (U.A.)  

Tall  Man  Riding  (W.B.)  

Tall  Men,  The  (20th-Fox) 

Tender  Trap,  The  (MGM)  . . 

Tennessee's  Partner  (RKO)  

Three  Stripes  in  the  Sun  (Col.)  

Tight  Spot  (Col.)  

To  Catch  a Thief  (Par.)  

To  Hell  and  Back  (U-l)  

Treasure  of  Pancho  Villa  (RKO) 

Trial  (MGM) 

Ulysses  (Par.)  

View  from  Pompey's  Head  (20th-Fox) 

Virgin  Queen,  The  (20th-Fox)  

Warriors,  The  (A.A.)  

We're  No  Angels  (Par.)  

Wichita  (A.A.)  

You're  Never  Too  Young  (Par.)  


EX 

AA 

AV 

BA 

PR 

_ 

_ 

6 

13 

9 

18 

21 

36 

10 

3 

7 

35 

29 

8 

6 

- 

- 

5 

7 

5 

2 

_ 

14 

22 

19 

- 

3 

4 

7 

10 

2 

- 

13 

9 

7 

10 

33 

24 

14 

8 

- 

12 

33 

16 

5 

1 

- 

4 

1 

_ 

7 

1 

10 

4 

16 

1 

28 

31 

14 

3 

35 

29 

1 1 

3 

- 

- 

5 

4 

20 

6 

- 

5 

15 

8 

14 

— 

- 

3 

4 

6 

1 

1 1 

- 

3 

9 

13 

2 

10 

33 

12 

10 

1 

- 

- 

10 

13 

7 

6 

_ 

8 

14 

9 

3 

17 

7 

34 

9 

14 

9 

20 

14 

1 

2 

21 

27 

18 

8 

- 

2 

10 

8 

i 

4 

18 

34 

27 

9 

- 

2 

9 

15 

12 

_ 

_ 

3 

3 

3 

- 

- 

2 

6 

15 

3 

10 

7 

1 

_ 

2 

19 

22 

5 

1 

- 

3 

8 

3 

2 

- 

6 

6 

3 

2 

_ 

2 

1 1 

6 

7 

- 

- 

7 

9 

21 

1 

7 

52 

18 

5 

- 

- 

4 

2 

4 

- 

- 

7 

9 

17 

33 

28 

10 

10 

10 

43 

36 

18 

4 

2 

_ 

2 

5 

15 

12 

- 

1 

1 

6 

2 

- 

26 

26 

16 

4 

- 

2 

10 

16 

14 

- 

1 1 

21 

16 

2 

39 

30 

13 

5 

- 

- 

6 

8 

4 

9 

_ 

15 

12 

1 1 

3 

1 

23 

10 

1 

- 

2 

3 

2 

2 

- 

_ 

1 

9 

6 

4 

1 

1 

3 

3 

- 

- 

4 

8 

10 

1 1 

6 

12 

19 

13 

5 

18 

26 

3 

1 

- 

_ 

- 

8 

8 

18 

1 

2 

16 

9 

1 

3 

1 

7 

10 

5 

2 

4 

6 

7 

22 

1 

- 

12 

10 

13 

_ 

_ 

5 

5 

_ 

_ 

7 

21 

22 

10 

2 

17 

13 

5 

4 

1 

21 

18 

13 

3 

MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


35 


CLASSIFIED  ADVERTISING 


Fifteen  cents  per  word,  money-order  or  check  with  copy.  Count  initials,  box  number  and  address.  Minimum  Insertion  $ 1 .50.  Four 
insertions  for  the  price  of  three.  Contract  rates  on  application.  No  border  or  cuts.  Forms  close  Mondays  at  5 P.M.  Publisher 
reserves  the  right  to  reject  any  copy.  Film  and  trailer  advertising  not  accepted.  Classified  advertising  not  subject  to  agency 
commission.  Address  copy  and  checks:  MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  Classified  Dept.,  Rockefeller  Center,  New  York  (20) 


NEW  EQUIPMENT 


BEST  aNEMASCOPE  VALUE!  SEND  PROJEC- 
tion  throw-screen  size,  we’ll  compute  your  require- 
ments. Cinematic  IV  adjustable  anamorphic  $37S  pr. 
Metallic  seamless  screens,  7Sc  sq.  ft.  Buy  on  time. 
S.  O.  S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY  CORP.,  602  W.  S2nd  St., 
New  York  19. 


BARGAINS  GALORE— HOLMES  PARTS!  CON- 
denser  lenses,  95c;  constant  speed  motors  $12.50; 
shutter  shafts  $1.25;  sound  optical  lenses  $9.95;  inter- 
mittent $24.50;  Star-Sprocket  assembly  $10.;  EE-14070 
Vertical  Drive  Shaft  w/5  gears,  bearings  $9.75; 
lOOOW  T-20C-13  Mogul  prefocus  Lamps  $25  dozen 
($3.95  each).  S.  O.  S.  aNEMA  SUPPLY  CORP., 
602  W.  52nd  St.,  New  York  19. 


NEW  AUTOM.'^TTC  ENCLOSED  REWINDS  $69.50; 
Simplex  Acme  Magazines,  upper  and  lower  combina- 
tion. $39.50.  S.  O.  S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY  CORP..  602 
W.  52nd  St..  New  York  19. 


WANTED  TO  BUY 


WANTED  — ILLUSTRATED  SONG  SLIDES. 
Collector  wants  early  pop.,  comic,  sentimental  titles. 
Will  buy  small  or  large  lots.  JOHN  RIPLEY,  2400 
Crestview,  Topeka,  Kans. 


POSITIONS  WANTED 


MANAGER— CAPABLE,  EXPERIENCED,  FAM- 
ily  man,  age  38.  Now  assistant  general  manager  small 
circuit.  Consider  anywhere.  Pleasant  working  condi- 
tions. Prefer  South.  BOX  2892,  MOTTON  PICTURE 
HERALD. 


HELP  WANTED 


SALESMEN— AGENTS  MAKE  EXTRA  MONEY— 
sell  nationally  advertised  automatic  Sno-Ball  Sno-Cone 
machines  on  easy  terms.  SNO-MASTER  MFG.  CO., 
124  Hopkins  PI.,  Baltimore  1,  Md. 


THEATRES 


THEATRE,  GROSSING  $20,000  ANNUALLY,  ONLY 
theatre  in  trade  area  of  7,500,  Western  Kansas.  Built 
new  from  the  ground  up  in  1948.  Modern  and  im- 
maculate in  every  way;  wonderful  opportunity  for 
couple,  quick  pay  out  assured.  Information  and  free 
photos  mailed,  no  obligation  whatsoever  on  your  part. 
C-5691  CONTINENTAL.  804  Grand,  Kansas  Oty,  Mo. 


STUDIO  EQUIPMENT 


MICRORECORD  16/35MM  AUTOMATIC  PROC- 
essing  outfits,  demonstrators,  $136.95;  Auricon  16mm 
Recorder  $295;  Neumade  Editing  Tables  with  work- 
light  $58  value,  $33.95;  Moviola  35mm  composite  sound/ 
picture  $495;  Bardwell  McAlister  studio  floodlites,  3 
heads  on  rolling  stand  hold  12  bulbs,  $180  value,  $29.50; 
Quadlite  Heads  only  $4.95;  Stands  only  $19.95;  10' 
Title  Animation  Stand,  motorized  zoom,  stop  motion, 
$2,500  value,  $975.  S.  O.  S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY  CORP., 
602  W.  52nd  St.,  New  York  19. 


USED  EQUIPMENT 


EXCELLENT  COATED  PROJECTION  LENSES— 
many  brand  new!  Wollensak  “Sunray”  Series  I:  2", 
3",  PA",  m",  5",  5'A",  554",  6",  7W  $35.00  pair. 
Super  Snaplite  fl.  9— 2"-254"  $170.00  pr. ; Superbte 
2)4"-3"-354"  $150.00  pr.;  Superlite  354"  $90.00  pi. 
Trades  Taken.  Wire  or  telephone  order  today.  S.  O.  S. 
aNEMA  SUPPLY  CORPORATION,  602  W.  52nd 
Street,  New  York  19. 


PAIR  DEVRY  12,000  PROJECTORS,  70  AMPERE 
lamphouses,  rectifiers,  etc.,  excellent,  $1,495;  E7 
mechanisms,  excellent,  $475  pair;  Magnarc  lamphouses, 
late  type  $475  pair;  Strong  Ikw  lamphouses  and  recti- 
fiers $475  complete;  bargains  on  new  and  used  lenses. 
What  do  you  need?  STAR  aNEMA  SUPPLY.  621 
W.  55th  St.,  New  York  19. 


BOOKS 


RICHARDSON’S  BLUEBOOK  OF  PROJECTION. 
New  8th  Edition.  Revised  to  deal  with  the  latest  tech- 
nical developments  in  motion  picture  projection  and 
sound,  and  reorganized  to  facilitate  study  and  refer- 
ence. Includes  a practical  discussion  of  Television 
especially  prepared  for  the  instruction  of  theatre  pro- 
jectionists, and  of  new  techniques  for  advancement  of 
the  art  of  the  motion  picture.  The  standard  textbook 
on  motion  picture  projection  and  sound  reproduction. 
Invaluable  to  beginner  and  expert.  Best  seller  since 
1911.  662  pages,  cloth  lx>und,  $7.25  postpaid.  QUIGLEY 
BOOKSIIOP,  1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New  York  20,  N.  Y. 


NEW  — FOR  THEATRE  MANAGERS  — “THE 
Master  Guide  to  Theatre  Maintenance,”  compiled  from 
authorities,  handy  for  reference  with  hard  covers  ana 
index.  Chapters  on  maintenance  of  building  and 
furnishings,  on  air  conditioning,  projection,  sound,  ex- 
ploitation devices,  all  written  in  non-technical  language 
especially  for  theatre  owners,  managers  and  staffs. 
Indexed  for  ready  reference.  Send  $5.00  today  to 
QUIGLEY  BOOKSHOP,  1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New 
York  20,  N.  Y. 


MOTION  PICTURE  ALMANAC  — the  big  book 
about  your  business — 1956  edition.  Contains  over  12,000 
biographies  of  important  motion  picture  personalities. 
A.lso  all  industry  statistics.  Complete  listings  of  feature 
pictures  1944  to  date.  Order  your  copy  today.  $5.00, 
postage  included.  Send  remittance  to  QUIGLEY 
BOOKSHOP,  1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New  York  20,  N.  Y. 


SERVICES 


THEATRE  BLOWUPS  BEST  OUALITY  SERV- 
ice.  STITES  PORTRAIT  COMPANY,  Shelbyville, 
Ind. 


BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES 


NO  TELEVISION,  TOWN  10,000  PEOPLE.  MOD- 
ern.  CinemaScope,  building,  equipment,  netting  $22,000. 
Will  pay  out  four  years.  $50,000  down.  Brochure. 
P.  McADAM,  Livingston,  Mont. 


Etl  Mfotvden 
Dies  at  67 

Edward  C.  Dowden,  67,  public  relations 
director  of  Loew’s  Theatres,  Inc.,  died 
January  1 at  his  home  in  Garden  City, 
Long  Island,  N.  Y. 

Mr.  Dowden  had 
been  with  Loew’s 
Theatres  for  27 
years.  Born  in 
Brooklyn,  he  was 
first  a newspaper- 
man for  the  Brook- 
lyn Citizen  and  later 
for  the  Standard 
Union.  While  with 
L o e w’ s Theatres, 
Inc.,  he  handled 
publicity  for  Loew’s 
.Metropolitan  thea- 
tre in  Brooklyn,  and 
for  many  years  was  assistant  to  Oscar  A. 
Doob,  and  later  Ernest  Emerling,  national 
publicity  and  advertising  director  of  Loew’s 
Theatres. 

During  World  War  II  he  was  chairman 


of  the  Special  Events  Committee  of  the 
Motion  Picture  Industry’s  War  Activities 
Committee.  He  was  active  in  various  chari- 
table and  philanthropic  activitieSu  Mr. 
Dowden  was  also  a member  of  the  Silurians, 
a society  of  New  York  newspapermen.  He 
is  survived  by  his  widow,  Mary  Theresa 
Dowden,  their  son,  Marriott  T.  and  daugh- 
ter Elizabeth,  and  Edward  C.  Dowden,  Jr. 
and  Mrs.  Julia  A.  Kepner,  children  of  his 
first  wife,  who  died  in  1928,  and  four  grand- 
children. 


Edward  F.  Swanson 

Edward  F.  Swanson,  67,  manager  of  the 
municipally-owned  Auditorium  theatre.  Red 
Wing,  Minn.,  died  in  that  community  De- 
cember 26.  At  one  time  he  was  in  vaude- 
ville, and  was  a former  member  of  the  West 
Point  military  band,  John  Philip  Sousa’s 
band  and  Paul  Whiteman’s  orchestra.  Later 
he  managed  the  Pantages  theatre  in  Minne- 
apolis. Surviving  are  his  wife,  a daughter, 
a brother  and  two  sisters. 


Robert  O.  Schoham  Dies 

HAVANA : Robert  O.  Schoham,  manager 
of  MGM  of  Cuba,  died  in  Havana  De- 
cember 29.  He  joined  the  MGM  organiza- 
tion in  1928  and  became  manager  in  Finland 


in  1932.  Since  then  he  served  in  numerous 
manager  posts,  including  Belgium,  Sweden 
and  Puerto  Rico. 


Robert  D.  Fairbanks 

WELLESLEY  HILLS,  MASS.:  Robert  D. 
Fairbanks,  veteran  Altec  Service  field  engi- 
neer, died  at  his  home  here  December  25. 
Mr.  Fairbanks,  associated  with  ERPI, 
predecessor  of  Altec,  was  engaged  in  thea- 
tre sound  service  activities  for  many  years, 
^lore  recently,  he  had  been  a member  of 
Altec’s  New  York  headquarters  engineering 
staff.  He  is  survived  by  his  wife. 

New  Ticket  Tax  Approved  by 
Connecticut  Legislature 

HARTFORD : The  Connecticut  legislature 
has  approved  a tax  increase  measure  primar- 
ily designed  to  raise  flood-recovery  funds. 
The  amusement  tax,  effective  February  1, 
is  going  up  25  cents  to  eight  dollars  a day 
for  nine  months,  depending  on  the  seating 
capacities  of  the  theatres.  Those  with  less 
than  500  seats  will  pay  only  25  cents  more 
daily,  while  those  from  500  to  749  will  pay 
$1  more  per  day.  The  tax  is  graduated  up 
to  $8  for  those  theatres  with  seating  capaci- 
ties of  more  than  2,500. 


36 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


An  International  Association  of  Motion  Picture  Showmen — Walter  Brooks,  Director 


tfcu  Can  Pf0i)e  AltnpM  Antfthin^  If  if  the  ^tatUtician^ 


At  this  time  of  year,  the  statisticians  as- 
assemble  all  sorts  of  figures  to  prove 
what  has  happened,  and  to  predict 
what  will  happen  in  the  future.  Personally, 
we  think  the  statisticians  themselves  should 
be  laid  end  to  end — to  prove  that  what  they 
find  depends  on  who  pays  their  fees. 

Allied  States  Association  has  been  con- 
ducting surveys,  which  are  quoted  in  the 
most  recent  Indiana  bulletin,  to  show  that 
the  number  of  annual  visits  to  the  movies  by 
each  person  in  America  has  declined  from 
34.3  in  1946  to  an  estimated  low  of  16.7  in 
1955.  That  could  be  very  misleading,  for  it 
doesn't  indicate  percentages  as  reliably  as 
they  would  have  you  think — without  due 
consideration  of  other  factors.  More  people, 
with  more  money  to  spend,  go  less  often  to 
the  movies  today  than  formerly,  but  it  isn't 
the  product  shortage,  nor  higher  admissions, 
nor  extended  runs  that  are  to  be  blamed.  On 
the  contrary,  business  is  good  for  good  thea- 
tres, with  good  pictures,  at  high  prices — for 
the  public  may  stay  at  home  and  see  tele- 
vision, if  they  prefer  anything  else. 

The  government  has  a big  electronic  brain 
that  works  something  like  a cash  register 
and  rings  up  a new  citizen  in  this  country 
about  every  four  seconds.  The  total  figure 
registered  as  of  New  Year’s  Day,  1956,  is 
an  estimated  166,700,000  persons,  which  is 
an  increase  of  15,600,000  since  1950.  Then — 
another  set  of  figures  from  the  Gallup  survey 
says  that  the  American  people  set  an  all- 
time  church  attendance  record  in  1955 — an 
amazing  increase  since  1950.  At  one  time, 
less  than  one  third  of  the  population  went  to 
church.  Now,  more  than  half  are  regular 
church  goers.  There  are  other  and  more 
damaging  statistics  to  prove  that  we  lack  the 
showmanship  at  the  point  of  sale  to  com- 
mand the  public’s  amusement  dollar,  or  even 
their  leisure  time,  or  the  obligation  they 
have  to  church  and  home.  Recreation  adds 
up  to  a larger  sum  than  ever  before  in  his- 
tory, and  it  costs  vastly  more  than  it  did  in 
the  past — but  we’re  not  getting  our  fair  and 
reasonable  share  of  these  huge  totals. 

The  Indiana  bulletin  wonders  if  the  movies 
will  follow  the  same  path  as  the  legitimate 


THE  MARCH  OF  DIMES 

Again,  our  Industry  should  welcome  its 
opportunity  to  work  for  "The  March  of 
Dimes"  in  the  fight  against  polio,  which  is 
our  great  industry  problem  and  enemy  of 
the  box  office.  This  year,  the  National 
Foundation  for  Infantile  Paralysis  asks  the 
public  for  $47,600,000  in  a drive  that 
opened  Wednesday,  January  4th. 

The  year  just  past  has  been  a year  of 
problems,  and  of  success,  in  the  treatment 
and  prevention  of  polio.  It  will  be  a year 
to  remember,  when  the  twelve  month  study 
of  the  Salk  vaccine  ended,  to  show  that  the 
treatment  was  safe,  potent  and  effective. 
Over  7,000,000  children  have  received  their 
Salk  vaccine  shots  provided  by  the  Founda- 
tion, and  3,000,000  from  other  sources. 

The  national  polio  toll  of  30,000  cases  in 
1955  included  epidemics  in  Massachusetts 
and  Wisconsin.  By  December  1 0th,  the 
disease  had  struck  3,893  victims  in  Boston 
and  surrounding  areas — more  than  three 
times  as  many  as  the  previous  year  and  six 
times  the  average  in  recent  years.  In  Wis- 
consin, polio  struck  in  2,492  cases,  four 
times  as  many  as  in  the  previous  year.  The 
Foundation  stood  by,  with  iron  lungs  and 
emergency  equipment,  using  2,492  pieces 
of  expensive  apparatus  to  meet  this  tre- 
mendous necessity. 

Polio  is  our  business,  and  it  strikes  so  at 
the  heart  of  film  industry  that  we  should 
never  relinquish  the  obligation  that  we  have 
assumed  at  the  local  level. 


stage,  which  is  a good  question,  that  must 
be  answered,  “Yes,  but’’ — the  legitimate 
stage  is  celebrating  one  of  the  best  and 
brightest  seasons  in  their  history.  One  of  the 
critics  remarked,  “Even  the  flops  are  fun.” 
The  “road”  is  dead — but  it  died  of  natural, 
and  local  causes,  while  the  top-bracket  qual- 
ity of  first-run  theatres  has  never  declined 
below  previous  averages.  Try  to  buy  seats 
for  a Broadway  show,  and  find  out  for  your- 
self, without  the  benefit  of  statisticians. 


^ NICE  VISITORS,  this  week,  at  the 
Round  Table — and  all  of  us  at  Quigley  Pub- 
lications were  glad  to  see  them  here.  Wil- 
liam Wyatt,  manager  of  the  Virginian  thea- 
tre, Charleston,  W.  Va.,  who  was  this  year’s 
Quigley  Grand  Award  winner  in  small  situ- 
ations, with  Mrs.  Wyatt — and  their  four 
lovely  daughters — ages  eight  to  sixteen 
years.  As  nice  a family  as  you’ll  find  in 
these  forty-eight  States — from  coast  to  coast 
and  border  to  border,  and  beyond.  Mr. 
Quigley  remarked,  “Which  one  is  the 
mother  ?” — to  give  you  an  idea. 

They  came  to  New  York  at  a busy  time, 
but  we’re  sure  they  enjoyed  it.  It’s  even 
more  crowded  here  than  they  had  thought. 
They  saw  “Oklahoma !”  and  “Guys  and 
Dolls” — and  went  to  Cinerama  and  the 
Music  Hall,  where  the  lines  were  around 
three  blocks,  with  thousands  waiting  for 
seats,  all  day  long.  They  visited  the  Stanley 
Warner  home  office,  where  Bill  checked  in 
as  one  of  their  best  managers,  on  vacation. 
They  went  to  the  United  Nations,  and  to  St. 
Patrick’s  Cathedral,  and  saw  Rockefeller 
Center  in  Christmas  dress,  and  Times 
Square  on  New  Year’s  Eve.  We  hope  they 
had  lots  of  fun — and  will  come  again. 

^ RAW  FILM  use  constitutes  a barometer 
of  motion  picture  business  that  can’t  be  de- 
nied, although  the  manufacturers  have  long 
maintained  this  information  as  confidential. 
One  authority  claims  that  Eastman,  DuPont 
and  Agfa  are  now  selling  more  raw  and  de- 
veloped film  in  a single  month  than  was  sold 
in  an  entire  year  in  1935.  Their  total  sales 
for  1955  will  exceed  380  million  feet.  This 
includes  upwards  of  200  theatrical  feature 
films  in  contrast  with  more  than  3,000  films 
for  television,  and  200  commercial  pictures 
made  for  other  industries.  It  is  well  to  note 
that  television  now  supplies  fifteen  times  as 
many  film  subjects  as  are  required  for  mo- 
tion picture  theatres,  but  the  number  of 
prints  for  theatres  is  now  often  more  than 
doubled  because  of  the  special  processes  in- 
volved in  our  distribution. 

— Walter  Brooks 


MANAGERS'  ROUND  TABLE  SECTION,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


37 


mm 


Spectacular  welcome  for  Warner's  "A  Star  is 
Born"  at  the  Palads  theatre,  Copenhagen,  arranged 
by  Paul  Lyngbye-Lyngsicjold,  for  the  Danish 
premiere  of  this  important  picture,  in  December. 


Sam  Salwiti,  manager  of  the  first-run  Mayfair  theatre,  on  Broadway,  greets  a 
contingent  of  full-blooded  Hopi  Indians  who  performed  tribal  dances  at  the  New 
York  premiere  of  United  Artists'  "The  Indian  Fighter"  as  part  of  the  high-powered 
ballyhoo,  which  included  a caravan  of  covered  wagons,  in  the  holiday  traffic  jam. 


Swiss  color  sells  "Heidi  and  Peter  " for 
manager  Bob  Ricker,  left,  at  the  World 
theatre,  Minneapolis.  Banner  - bearing 
goat  adds  to  the  atmosphere,  with  other 
kids  in  Alpine  costume. 


So  this  is  the  "Second  Greatest  Sex" — Kitty  Kallen,  co-star 
of  Universal-International's  current  picture,  autographs  record 
albums  on  her  personal  appearance  tour  of  the  key  cities. 


Trigger  - action  for 
"The  Man  With  the 
Gun"  — pert  Caroline 
O'Donnell,  gun  - toting 
gal  for  the  United 
Artists'  picture,  has 
manager  Bill  Zeiler,  of 
Loew's  Penn  theatre, 
Pittsburgh,  backed 
against  the  wall,  with 
his  hands  in  the  air,  in 
typical  frontier  flavor. 


J.  P.  Harrison,  genial 
veteran  at  the  Campus 
theatre,  Denton,  Texas, 
sends  this  photo  of  his 
"Rock  & Roll"  all-Negro 
film  show,  done  at  mid- 
night for  the  rock-and- 
roll  addicts. 


38 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


TJ\T-Meatts 
"To€la  If — iVo# 
Totnorrotv  ” 


CONTENDERS  FOR 
QEMGEEY  AWARD 


Seymour  Morris,  advertising  and  pub- 
licity director  for  Schine’s  Theatres,  Glov- 
ersville,  N.  Y.,  devised  a neat  slogan  for  his 
“Earn- It- Yourself’’  drive,  from  September 
4th  through  November  26th — and  that  was 
the  idea  of  calling  it  “TNT” — to  indicate 
"Toda}',  not  Tomorrow.”  In  his  book, 
“Drive  Days  were  Thrive  Days” — and  high 
on  his  list  we  note  Colonel  Bob  Cox,  our 
fellow  aide-de-camp  on  the  staff  of  the  Gov- 
ernor at  Lexington,  Kentucky,  who  had 
things  going  great-guns  in  the  capitol  city. 
He  divided  the  city  into  “Let’s  Get  Ac- 
fiuainted”  districts,  and  a routine  was 
worked  out  to  get  people  acquainted  with 
each  other,  and  with  the  Ben  Ali  theatre, 
using  the  theatre  staff'  as  ambassadors  of 
good  will,  in  these  neighborhood  areas. 
Clever  trick  was  to  cover  only  every  third. 
house,  on  the  theory  that  “word  would  get 
around” — and  it  w’as  more  effective  than 
ringing  every  bell. 

Jack  Mitchell,  northern  division  manager 
for  Schine  is  still  another  of  those  Kentucky 
Colonels,  a long  waj's  from  Churchill 
Downs,  but  his  particular  idea  was  to  bump 
Harry  Unterfort,  district  manager  at  Syra- 
cuse, off  his  home  base.  And  it  looked  like 
a feud  between  the  Hatfields  and  the  Mc- 
Coys, to  prove  just  who  was  the  real  McCoy 
in  this  controversy.  These  Kentuckians  (and 
we’re  a Colonel  of  twenty-five  years  stand- 
ing) are  up  on  Indian  fighting.  They  get 
you  when  you’re  not  looking — and  where 
you’re  not  looking ! The  final  results  are 
not  in,  at  this  desk,  but  we  know  there  were 
some  victories,  and  some  casualties,  on  the 
Schine  circuit  home  front. 


Ge-hs  Good  Business  by 
"Going  to  the  Dogs" 

By  “going  to  the  dogs”,  manager  Bud 
Owens  of  the  Rivoli  Theatre,  La  Crosse, 
Wis.  turned  a lull  period  into  a profitable 
4-day  run. 

The  retitled  MGM  film,  “A  Dog’s  Life” 
lured  a healthy  portion  of  the  community’s 
children  and  adult  dog  lovers  to  the  Rivoli 
as  the  result  of  a highly  successful  promo- 
tion. Plenty  of  newspaper  pictures  and  radio 
and  television  publicity  resulted  when  Owens 
preceded  the  film  with  a Pooch  Contest,  and 
a well  publicized  parade  of  dogs  and  their 
owners  through  downtown  La  Crosse  which 
ended  with  a canine  banquet  in  front  of  the 
Rivoli. 

Prizes  were  awarded  for  the  Homeliest 
Dog;  the  Cutest  Dog;  the  Smartest  Dog 
and  Best  Costumed  Dog.  Fromm  Dog  Food 
Co.,  tieing  in  with  the  promotion,  provided 
the  fare  for  the  banquet  and  gave  all  dog 
owners  who  entered  the  affair  a free  supply 
of  dog  food  and  a special  eating  bowl  for 
their  pets. 


Domestic 

U.  S.  ALLAIRE 
Victoria 

Victoriaville,  Can. 

MARK  ALLING 
Golden  Gate 
San  Francisco,  Cal. 

RALPH  BARTLETT 
Capitol,  Hamilton,  Can. 

RUSS  BARRETT 
Capitol 

Willimantic,  Conn. 

JAMES  J.  BEEBE 
Walton,  Walton,  N.  Y. 

F.  J.  BICKLER 
Wisconsin,  Milwaukee 

JOHN  P.  BRUNETTE 
Studio,  San  Jose,  Cal. 

JAMES  CAMERON 
Capitol 

Ft.  William,  Can. 

BOB  CARNEY 

Poli,  Waterbury,  Conn. 

JOHN  G.  CORBETT 
Schine  Theatres 
Gloversville,  N.  Y. 

JAMES  A.  DUNCAN 
23rd  St.  Drive-In 
Chattanooga,  Tenn. 

ED  FORCE 

Brandeis,  Omaha,  Nebr. 

LEE  FRASER 
Bloomfield 
Birmingham,  Mich. 

CHARLES  GAUDINO 
Poli 

Springfield,  Mass. 

ERIC  A.  GILLETT 
Savoy,  Newark,  N.  J. 

SAM  GILMAN 
State,  Syracuse,  N.  Y. 

DIANE  GORDON 
Oritani 

Hackensack,  N.  J. 

J.  GREENBERGER 
Prsopect,  Brooklyn 

ARTHUR  HALLOCK 
Paramount 
Baltimore,  Md. 

J.  P.  HARRISON 
Campus,  Denton,  Texas 

REX  HOPKINS 
Hollywood 
Portland,  Ore. 

MEL  JOLLEY 
Century 
Hamilton,  Can. 

FRANK  KENNEDY 
Sinking  Spring 
Sinking  Spring,  Pa. 

ARNOLD  KIRSCH 
DeLuxe,  New  York 

SHELDON  KLIMAN 
Riviera,  blastings,  Minn. 


FRANK  LAWSON 
Danforth 
Toronto,  Can. 

T.  MURRAY  LYNCH 
Paramount, 

Moncton,  Can. 

TONY  MASELLA 
Palace,  Meriden,  Conn. 

PETER  MELNYK 
Century 

Bonnyville,  Can. 

M.  M.  MESHER 

Paramount, 

Portland,  Ore. 

gene  moulaison 

Loew's,  Canton,  Ohio 

VICTOR  NOWE 
Odeon,  Toronto,  Can. 

R.  H.  OSMOND 
Alcazar,  Bell,  Cal. 

bud  OV/ENS 

Rivoli,  La  Crosse,  Wis. 

L.  W.  PALMER 
Colonial 

Port  Arthur,  Can. 

JOE  REAL 
Midwest 

Oklahoma  City,  Okla. 

RALPH  RUSSELL 
Palace,  Canton,  O. 

M.  A.  SARGEANT 
Neptune 

Daytona  Beach,  Fla. 

matt  SAUNDERS 
Poli,  Bridgeport,  Conn. 

frank  savage 

Warner,  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

ED  SCHOENTHAL 
Empress,  Fremont,  Nebr. 

JERRY  SCHUR 
Uptown,  Los  Angeles 

BEN  SCHWARTZ 
Lincoln,  Massillon,  O. 

IRWIN  SOLOMON 
Ohio,  Canton,  O. 

ROBERT  SOLOMON 
Victoria,  New  York 

SOL  SORKIN 
Keith's,  Syracuse,  N.  Y. 

JOHN  SPERDAKOS 
United  Amusement 
Montreal,  Can. 

C.  H.  STEWART 
Waco,  Waco,  Texas 

BEN  TUREMAN 
Russell,  Maysville,  Ky. 

HARRY  WILSON 
Capitol,  Chatham,  Can. 

RALPH  WINSHIP 
Majestic 

Phillipsburg,  Kans. 

CHET  WOERNER 
Fairmont 
Philadelphia,  Pa. 


Overseas 

J.  W.  BONNICK 
Regal,  Halifax,  Eng. 

C.  F.  BRODIE 
Regal,  Barrow,  Eng. 

S.  BURGESS 
Capitol,  Barking,  Eng. 

D.  M.  CAMPBELL 
Regal,  Stirling,  Scot. 

A.  G.  CAHELL 
Regal,  Torquay,  Eng. 

J.  D.  CLARK 
Odeon,  Bradford,  Eng. 

G.  A.  CLARKE 
Savoy,  Lincoln,  Eng. 

R.  L.  CO9K 
Savoy,  Swindon,  Eng. 

R.  J.  CRAB 
Lyric 

Wellingsborough,  Eng. 

D.  A.  DENYER 

Dominion 
Southhold,  Eng. 

J.  D.  DOOLEY 
Odeon 

Wolverhampton,  Eng. 

R.  N.  DOUGLAS 
Princes 

Springburn,  Scot. 

LAWRENCE  EDGE 
Alhambra,  Shotton,  Eng. 

C.  ELSON 

Dominion,  London,  Eng. 

tony  ewin 

Grand,  Banbury,  Eng. 
GEORGE  FAWCETT 

Plaza,  Queensferry,  Eng. 
J.  A.  GALLACHER 
Regal 

Kilmarnock,  Scot 

H,  E.  GEORGE 
Palace,  Arbroath,  Scot. 

L.  GRANSBURY 
Astra 

W.  Raynham,  Eng. 

A.  GRAY 
Olympia, 

Cardiff,  Wales 

T.  F.  GRAZIER 

Arcade 

Darlington,  Eng. 

E.  D.  HAINGE 
Odeon, 

Birmingham,  Eng. 

D.  HARDY 

Gaumont 

Gainsborough,  Eng. 

JAMES  M,  HART 
Olympia, 

Glasgow,  Scot, 

S.  HARVEY 

Ritz,  Romford,  Eng. 

REGINALD  HELLEY 
Ritz 

Huddersfield,  Eng. 


J.  H.  HIRST 
Regal,  Rochdale,  Eng. 

LIM  KENG  HOR 
Cathay,  Singapore 

G.  HUMPHREYS 
Gaumont 

St.  Albans,  Eng. 

S.  KAY 

Futurist,  Elsecar,  Eng. 

STANLEY  KRISMAN 
Savoy,  London,  Eng. 

DICK  LAWLESS 
Wests,  Adelaide,  Aust. 

PAUL  LYNGSKJOLD 
Palad, 

Copenhagen,  Den. 

D.  J.  MC  LEOD 
Coliseum 
Glasgow,  Scot 

D.  MACKRELL 
Ritz 

Huddersfield,  Eng. 

NAT  MATTHEWS 
Ritz,  Leyton,  Eng. 

H.  S.  MOH 

Paramount,  Hong  Kong 

R.  W.  PARKER 
Savoy,  Exeter,  Eng. 

jack  PLUNKETT 

Paramount 
Paris,  France 

C.  A.  PURVES 
Astra,  Hemswell,  Eng. 

SID  RAMSAY 

Pavilion 

Newcastle,  Eng. 

SYDNEY  L.  SALE 
Granada,  Dover,  Eng. 

V.  SIMS 

Ritz,  Oxford,  Eng. 

JOHN  L.  SMITH 
Ritz,  Edinburgh,  Scot. 

G.  H.  W.  SPARY 
Odeon,  Bradford,  Eng. 

D.  S.  TOMPKINS 
Odeon,  Taunton,  Eng. 

T.  W.  VERNON 
Gaiety,  Leeds,  Eng. 

L.  G.  WEBSTER 
Savoy, 

Northampton,  Eng. 

D.  H.  WESTERN 
Ritz,  Hereford,  Eng. 

S.  H.  WINTERSON 
Elephant  & Castle 
London,  Eng. 

T.  A.  WRIGHT 
Regal 

Birmingham,  Eng. 

E.  P.  WYETH 
Regent,  Swindon,  Eng. 


MANAGERS'  ROUND  TABLE  SECTION,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


39 


Tite  Miauy  & HVhy  ai 
Sellituy  Todd" AO 


Sets  Up  a Department 


Several  years  ago  the  renowned  publicist 
Steve  Hannagan  was  asked  for  his  expert 
advice  regarding  the  type  of  name  to  be 
given  to  the  new  wide  deep  screen  system 
that  Dr.  Brian  O’Brien  of  the  American 
Optical  Company  was  called  upon  to  invent 
and  develop.  Mr.  Hannagan’s  advice  was  as 
follows : Give  it  an  odd  name  and  I will 
make  it  a household  word.  Don’t  give  it  a 
name  containing  any  suffixes  of  “scope”  or 
“rama”  or  any  of  the  other  obvious  con- 
tracted names.  When  the  name  is  odd,  people 
first  inquire,  tliey  buy  later. 

Starting  With  a Name 

When  this  amazing  system  finally  became 
a reality,  the  board  of  directors  in  control 
of  this  revolutionary  screen  invention  met 
for  the  purpose  of  baptizing  it.  Michael 
Todd,  then  a member  of  the  board,  had 
originally  suggested  the  idea  for  the  de- 
velopment of  such  a system  to  Dr.  Brian 
O’Brien.  Because  of  this  contribution,  Todd, 
with  characteristic  modesty  rose  and  sug- 
gested the  name — The  Todd  System.  How- 
ever, due  to  the  fact  that  the  American 
Optical  Company  had  invested  much  money 
in  scientific  research  on  the  system  and  since 
Dr.  Brian  O’Brien  was  vice-president  of  the 
.American  Optical  and  since  his  profound 
discoveries  in  the  science  of  optics  has  made 
him  the  undisputed  authority  in  the  field, 
and  finally  since  it  was  Dr.  Brian  O’Brien’s 
leadership  and  direction  of  one  hundred  or 
more  other  scientists  in  this  research  project, 
the  American  Optical  felt  that  it  should  be 
somewhat  represented  in  the  baptismal  cere- 
mony— hence  the  name,  TODD-.AO. 


represents  in  its  entirety  paid  advertising 
in  terms  of  newspapers,  magazines,  posting, 
radio  and  television.  If  one  were  to  analyze 
the  dollar  value  received  in  terms  of  free 
publicity  in  pre-selling  “Oklahoma!”  the 
amount  would  reach  an  astronomical  figure. 
It  is  estimated  that  the  free  printed  space 
that  “Oklahoma  !”  has  received  exceeds  the 
figure  of  $25,000,000. 

Curiously  enough,  the  success  of  this  cam- 
paign was  based  upon  three  points  that  in 
the  beginning  loomed  vividly  as  three  dis- 
tinct disadvantages. 

1.  “Oklahoma!”  was  not  made  in  Okla- 
homa, but  in  Arizona.  Therefore,  the  less 
said  about  it,  the  better. 

2.  The  corn  that  was  especially  grown  to 
be  as  high  as  an  elephant’s  eye,  if  publicized 
would  become  pretty  “corny”  in  the  lan- 
guage of  Broadway. 

3.  Shirley  Jones,  one  of  the  stars  of  the 
picture,  since  she  was  a total  unknown  and 
had  never  appeared  except  in  the  chorus  of 
“Me  and  Juliet,”  should  not  be  publicized 
until  after  the  picture  opened. 

Yet  these  three  points  that  were  more  or 
less  taboo  in  the  beginning,  were  the  very 
points  utilized  in  affecting  the  campaign. 
What  appeared  to  be  disadvantages  were 
turned  to  most  fruitful  advantages.  The  pre- 
conceived fear  that  public  relations-wise 
these  three  points  might  cause  harm,  re- 
sulted in  the  complete  opposite. 


NICHOLAS  JOHN  MATSOUKAS 

Summarized,  the  “Oklahoma !”  and 
TODD-AO  campaign  represents  an  example 
of  hard  work  by  five  people  devoted  to  the 
idea  that  what  is  good  for  their  picture  is 
good  for  the  industry  as  a whole.  The  team 
of  McWilliams,  Peiser,  Borghese  and  Win- 
ters, headed  by  Matsoukas,  have  proved  to 
their  associates  and  fellow  workers  that  a 
major  campaign  of  publicity  and  exploita- 
tion does  not  necessarily  have  to  cost  mil- 
lions of  dollars. 

Above  all,  it  proved  that  a publicity  and 
advertising  campaign  is  not  just  fanciful 
stunts,  but  constitutes  a well  throught  out 
plan  based  upon  an  examination  of  the 
elements  present  and  channeling  them  into 
media  departments  most  receptive  to  their 
needs. 


The  advertising,  publicity  and  exploita- 
tion of  “Oklahoma !”  has  been  since,  Octo- 
ber 15,  1954,  under  the  direction  of  Nicholas 
John  Matsoukas.  His  staff  consists  of  three 
additional  people  in  the  national  headquar- 
ters in  New  York,  namely,  Harry  K.  Mc- 
Williams, as  his  executive  assistant;  John 
M.  Borghese  and  Barbara  Winters,  in  charge 
of  radio  and  television  and  sales  promotion. 
On  the  west  coast,  in  Los  Angeles,  Seymour 
Peiser  represents  Mr.  Matsoukas’  office. 
This  group  of  five  individuals  have  put  over 
a publicity  and  exploitation  campaign  that 
is  not  only  one  of  the  biggest,  but  has  been 
the  most  economically  handled. 

.According  to  official  statistics,  $6,800,000 
went  into  the  making  of  the  motion  picture. 
.Some  $4,000,000  went  into  research  for  the 
revolutionary  TODD-AO  system,  and  a 
budget  of  $1,250,000  has  been  allocated  for 
advertising,  thus  making  this  important  mo- 
tion picture  the  most  expensive  production 
ever  produced  in  the  history  of  the  industry. 

However,  the  $l,250,fXX)  for  advertising 


Harry  S.  Truman,  representing  an  important  Fan  Club  with  headquarters  at  Independence, 
Missouri,  greets  the  Messrs  Rodgers  and  Hammerstein,  in  the  lobby  of  a theatre,  since 
their  original  musical,  "Oklahoma!"  has  been  so  successful  as  a stage  attraction  that  they 
have  named  a state  after  it! 


40 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


RULES  OF  THE 


QUIGLEY 

AWARDS 

TWO  Grand  Award  plaques  will  be 

J awarded  annually  to  the  two  theatre 
managers  or  theatre  publicity  men  whose 
exploitation  and  promotion  campaigns  are 
adjudged  best  throughout  the  year,  one  in 
smaller  situations,  where  the  manager  is 
"on  his  own" — the  other  in  larger  cities, 
where  there  may  be  circuit  cooperation. 

V 

Every  three  months  a committee  of 
judges  will  appraise  the  campaigns  sub- 
mitted by  contestants  during  the  preced- 
ing quarter  period  and  select  two  show- 
men to  receive  the  Quarterly  Awards  for 
outstanding  achievement.  The  next  seven 
best  will  receive  Scrolls  of  Honor.  Cita- 
tions of  Merit  will  be  awarded  to  forty 
theatre  men  whose  work  is  outstanding. 

V 

Consistency  of  effort  is  of  paramount 
importance.  Single  submissions  are  less 
likely  to  win  awards,  which  are  made  on 
the  premise  of  sustained  effort,  but  these 
may  have  news  value  in  the  Round  Table. 

V 

No  fancy  entries  are  necessary.  Costly 
and  time-wasting  "gingerbread"  decora- 
tion are  not  encouraged. 

V _ 

In  addition  to  exploitation  on  feature 
pictures,  entries  may  be  made  on  short 
subjects,  serials,  stage  shows,  or  institu- 
tional and  civic  promotions. 

V 

Evidence  proving  authenticity  of  each 
entry  should  be  submitted,  such  as  photos, 
tear  sheets,  programs,  heralds,  etc. 

V 

The  Round  Table  cannot  undertake  to 
prepare  campaign  books  for  submission  to 
the  judges  from  material  sent  in  without 
assembly  at  the  source. 

V 

The  Quigley  Awards  make  no  distinc- 
tion for  size  of  theatre  or  community  except 
the  two  classifications  above.  The  judges 
make  full  allowance  for  individual  show- 
manship displayed  by  comparing  budgets, 
newspaper  facilities  and  assistance  from 
distributing  companies. 

V 

In  addition  to  the  awards  mentioned, 
special  Certificates  of  Merit  will  be 
awarded  quarterly  and  annually  to  show- 
men from  outside  the  United  States  and 
Canada.  The  campaigns  submitted  by  the- 
atre men  abroad  which  are  deemed  of 
special  merit  shall  be  included  in  the  annual 
competition. 

Address  all  entries  to: 

QUIGLEY  AWARDS  COMMITTEE 
MANAGERS’  ROUND  TABLE 
1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New  York  20,  N.  Y. 


^eiilna 


ina  ^y^ppifoaCi 


k 


THE  DIVIDED  HEART  — J.  Arthur  Rank- 
Republic.  The  critics  are  united  in  praise 
of  this  unusual  film,  which  tells  the  story  of 
a little  boy  who  was  torn  between  two 
mothers,  as  an  aftermath  of  war.  A superior 
film,  of  great  beauty  and  compassion, 
which  has  won  high  honors  in  the  critics' 
lists  of  the  ten  best  pictures  of  the  year.  A 
picture  to  attract  the  audience  that  has 
been  lost  to  movies,  and  which  seeks  off- 
beat entertainment  of  high  emotional 
value.  The  attraction  has  made  its  reputa- 
tion in  the  little  art  theatres,  but  it  can 
appeal  to  the  family  instinct,  anywhere  in 
America.  "Rewarding"  — "Mature"  — 
"Poignant"  — "Heart  - Stlrrirrg"  — these 
are  the  comments  of  the  nation's  critics. 
Newspaper  ad  mats  Include  some  good  ex- 
amples in  both  large  and  small  sizes — and 
there  are  one-  and  three-sheet  posters,  not 
Illustrated.  No  herald,  but  you  can  print 
your  own.  No  composite  mat,  but  you  can 
select  what  you  need.  This  will  pay  off  In 
proportion  to  your  desire  to  solve  the 
product  shortage. 

I DIED  A THOUSAND  TIMES— Warner 
Brothers.  CinemaScope  in  WarnerColor. 
Starring  Jack  Palance  and  Shelly  Winters. 
The  story  of  hunted  criminal  No.  I — a man 
with  a thousand  lives,  and  a crime  in  every 
one!  The  man — hard  to  get,  hard  to  find, 
hard  to  kill!  The  girl — a dime-a-dance  doll 
with  a million  dollar  dream!  Posters,  Includ- 
ing 6-sheet,  planned  to  give  you  cut-outs 
for  lobby  and  marquee  display.  Tabloid 
herald  In  mat  form,  to  print  locally,  sharing 
cost  with  cooperative  merchant.  Use  It  as 
a flash.  Newspaper  ad  mats  in  large  and 
small  sizes,  with  the  combination  mat  at 
35c  supplying  eight  ad  mats  and  slugs,  and 
two  publicity  mats.  A special  mat.  No. 
8 1 9-50 IX  gives  you  a contest  Idea,  to 
assemble  the  portrait  of  the  star  under  the 
caption,  "Catch  the  Killer."  It's  a good 
stunt  and  the  three  mixed-up  faces  can  be 
run  for  three  days  as  a newspaper  feature. 

TARANTULA  — Universal  - International. 

Giant  spider — deadly  accident  of  science 
— and  every  second  it  grew  bigger!  Tower- 
ing over  cities:  even  dynamite  can't  stop  it! 
Thousands  flee  Its  terror.  Researchers  seek- 
ing clue;  list  of  victims  mounts  hourly.  Air 
Force  joins  fight!  Crawling  terror  is  100 
feet  high.  Shock — plus  a brand  new  slant 
in  science  fiction.  John  Agar,  Mara  Cor- 
day,  Leo  Carroll  and  all  star  cast.  Posters 
up  to  6-sheet  in  size  all  carry  pictorial  art 
of  the  monster  Tarantula.  Herald  keys  the 
campaign  with  your  advertising  slants. 
Newspaper  ad  mats  In  tabloid  style  feature 
the  mighty  bug.  In  a variety  of  sizes  and 
shapes.  The  bargain  composite  mat  is 
really  excellent,  since  It  provides  six  good 
ad  mats  and  slugs  in  one-  and  two-column 
width,  plus  two  publicity  mats  of  the  star 


and  the  cast.  Buy  this  35c  mat  on  standing 
order  at  National  Screen  and  always  have  a 
choice  of  advertising  material  to  talk  over 
with  your  newspaper  man.  He  will  be  in- 
terested in  trying  to  find  something  new 
and  different  at  your  usual  budget. 

MAN  WITH  THE  GUN— Samuel  Goldwyn, 
Jr. — United  Artists.  His  gun  was  for  sale, 
and  so  was  his  life!  A man  who  lived  and 
breathed  violence.  He  had  posted  his 
challenge,  and  now,  as  always,  he  stood 
alone.  A new  Goldwyn  turns  out  a fasci- 
nating off-beat  western.  Robert  Mitchum, 
Jan  Sterling  and  all-star  cast.  Posters  and 
all  accessories  feature  Mitchum  in  a gun 
pose  that  becomes  the  trademark  of  this 
picture.  The  6-sheet  will  make  cut-outs  for 
your  lobby  to  match  the  herald,  from  Cato 
Show  Print.  Newspaper  ad  mats  are  equally 
good,  in  both  large  and  smalll  sizes  and 
shapes,  and  with  a difference  in  style  that 
will  set  this  apart  from  routine  westerns. 
The  picture  Is  Identified  as  "another  'High 
Noon'  " — for  critical  opinions.  The  special 
composite  mat  for  small  situations  offers 
eight  ad  mats  and  slugs,  plus  two  publicity 
mats,  all  for  35c  on  standing  order,  at 
National  Screen. 

THE  LAST  FRONTIER — Columbia  Pictures. 

CinemaScope  In  Technicolor.  The  men,  the 
women,  the  wilderness  of  America's  most 
exciting  days.  Victor  Mature,  as  the  man 
of  the  forest.  Guy  Madison,  as  the  soldier 
of  the  frontier.  Robert  Preston,  as  the 
tyrant  of  the  fort.  Satisfying  'Scope  and 
color  In  a superior  western,  with  thrilling 
mountain  scenery  as  a backdrop  for  his- 
torical adventure.  24-sheet  and  other 
posters  feature  Victor  Mature  as  the  Scout 
who  knew  Indian  country.  Four  page  herald 
keys  the  campaign  with  all  the  selling 
approach.  Newspaper  ad  mats  are  okey, 
but  one  in  particular,  and  the  biggest  of 
the  lot,  is  by  far  the  best,  and  in  contrast, 
all  the  others  are  ordinary.  The  35c  mat 
has  six  action  ad  mats  and  slugs,  and  two 
publicity  mats,  sufficient  for  small  theatres. 
A set  of  color  stills  will  sell  this  fine  color 
film  in  your  lobby. 


YOU'LL  GET 
THE  FINEST 
TRAILERS 
...IN  THE 
SHORTEST 
TIME.  FROM 


SPECIAL 

TRAILERS 


37  years  of  Know- 
How  means  Better 
Trailers...  Faster! 


FILMACK 


CHICAGO 
1327  S.  WABASH 


\ NEW  YORK 
\ 341  W.  44th  St. 


MANAGERS'  ROUND  TABLE  SECTION,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


41 


i 


50,000,000  times  a day  . . . 
IT’S  A MATTER  OF 


PREFERENCE- 


i 


Coca-Cola  is  the  most  asked-for 


soft  drink  among  people  ”on  the  joh”* 


1.  As  they  work,  Americans  drink  more 
Coca-Cola  than  all  other  soft  drinks 
combined. 


1 REFRESH/^ 


3.  Their  preference  is  your  profit 
when  you  feature  Coca-Cola. 


2.  After  work,  these  same  people  fill 
your  theatre. 


*1954  surveys  by 
Alfred  Politz  Research,  Inc. 


• ••more  than 
9,600  theatres  do! 


“COKE”  IS  A REGISTERED  TRADE*HARK 


Y. . POPCOM . . BEVERAGES . . FOOD . . AUTOMATIC  VEiVDIlVG 


GEORGE  SCHUTZ,  Director  . . . RICHARD  GERTNER,  Associate  Editor 


"Sweeter"  Candy  Profits  through 
"Dime"  Bars  and  Vending  Machines 


Sales  of  candy  in  theatres  are  reported  improved— thanks  to 
acceptance  of  "dime"  bars  by  patrons  and  a greater  use  of 
vending  machines  at  various  locations  away  from  main  stands.. 


Increased  candy  sales — and  bigger  profits — in  theatres  are  attributed  by  many  exhibitors  to 
the  use  of  vending  dispensers  away  from  the  stand,  such  as  the  two  which  form  a part  of  this 
battery  of  machines  at  Loew's  theatre,  Rochester,  N.  Y.  The  candy  machines  are  "Unevendoor" 
models  (made  by  Stoner  Manufacturing  Corporation,  Aurora.  III.);  the  drink  machine  at  the 
left  is  a Cole  Spa'  [made  by  Cole  Products,  Inc.,  Chicago);  the  cigarette  machine  is  a 
Rowe;  and  the  popcorn  dispenser  is  an  "Austocrat"  (made  by  the  Landis  Manufacturing 
Company,  Santa  Monica,  Calif.).  See  text  for  further  descriptions  of  this  vending  layout 
by  theatre  manager  Lester  Pollock. 


LARGER  .AND  moie  profit- 
able sales  of  candy  bars  recorded  recently 
in  theatres  can  be  attributed  primarily  to 
two  factors — acceptance  by  patrons  of  the 
“dime”  size  products  (as  opposed  to  their 
competitive  “five-cent”  brothers)  and  an 
increased  use  of  automatic  vending  ma- 
chines as  a supplement  to  sales  at  the  stand. 
So  leading  spokesmen  of  the  theatre  and 
confectionery  industries  have  reported  the 
situation  as  they  see  it  in  several  year-end 
analyses  of  this  market  and  its  prospects 
for  the  future. 

It  is  in  the  theatres  that  candy  manufac- 
turers have  found  the  best  of  all  outlets 
for  their  large-size  candies,  according  to 
the  trade  publication  Candy  Industry, 
which  a few  months  ago  made  a thorough 
survey  of  the  dime-bar  field.  It  was  found 
that  sales  in  theatres  presently  surpass  those 
in  such  other  operations  as  supermarkets, 
drug  and  variety  stores,  independent  candy 
and  cigar  stores  and  news  stands. 

Credit  for  the  supremacy  of  theatres  in 
selling  the  “ten-cent”  bars  must  be  given 
in  large  part  to  the  willingness  of  exhibitors 
to  introduce  the  larger  products  and  then 
promote  them  extensively  to  their  clientele. 
They  have  been  e.xtremely  succssful  in  this 
endeavor  despite  some  formidable  disad- 
vantages— including  the  necessity  to  sell 
the  “dime-size”  bars  at  llf^  or  \2^  (in  the 


BETTER  REFRESHMENT  MERCHANDISING 


43 


interest  of  making  a reasonable  profit ) and 
lack  of  proper  promotional  material  from 
most  manufacturers. 

In  inducing — and  educating — their  pub- 
lic to  accept  these  higher  prices,  exhibitors 
have  been  given  invaluable  aid,  however, 
by  a majority  of  the  candy  manufacturers, 
who  do  not  print  a price  on  the  bar  wrap- 
per, thus  leaving  it  to  the  theatre  operator 
to  charge  whatever  he  likes. 

Some  few  complaints  from  patrons  about 
the  "theatre-price”  for  candy  bars  have 
been  noted  by  exhibitors,  but,  by  and  large, 
they  state  that  acceptance  is  well-grounded 
and  gaining. 

As  spokesmen  for  both  the  candy  and 
theatre  industries  see  it,  one  sure  way  to 
hold  on  to  the  ground  already  gained  in  the 
dime-bar  market  is  to  “de-emphasize” 
nickel  goods — in  some  cases  to  complete  ex- 
clusion— and  never  to  sell  the  “small-size” 
counterpart  of  a bar  that  is  simultaneously 
offered  for  a “dime.” 

Some  impressive  evidence  in  behalf  of 
this  latter  policy  is  offered  by  the  Nestle 
Company,  White  Plains,  N.  Y.,  which  last 
year  withdrew  its  competing  nickel  bars 
from  all  Pacific  Coast  outlets.  At  the  same 
time  the  company  stepped  up  sharply  the 
advertising  of  “ten-cent”  bars  and  intensi- 
fied merchandising  and  promotional  efforts. 

Results,  according  to  T.  A.  Fowler, 
product  manager  of  bar  goods  sales  for 


Nestle,  were  as  follows:  the  volume  of  the 
larger  bars  on  the  Pacific  Coast  increased 
two  and  a half  times  and  is  continuing  to 
grow. 

“It  is  our  belief,”  declares  Mr.  Fowler, 
“that  the  thicker  10^  bar  gives  consumers 
greater  satisfaction  and  eating  pleasure  than 
its  thinner  5^  counterpart.” 

Given  this  type  of  support  by  other 
manufacturers  in  1956,  and  backed  furthei 
by  promotional  material  especially  designed 
for  theatre  stand  display,  the  dime  bar 
should  continue  to  advance  in  popularity 
and  acceptance  by  theatre  patrons. 

15^  ITEM  SUGGESTED 

Looking  even  further  into  the  future, 
Lee  Koken,  concessions  head  for  RKO 
Theatres,  New  York,  would  like  for  the 
candy  manufacturers  to  go  a step  farther 
and  make  a special  “15^S”  item.  He  is  con- 
fident that  the  public  will  buy  “any  15^ 
unit  if  it  is  a nationally-advertised  bar  or 
package”  since  “the  value  of  the  larger 
piece  is  immediately  recognized  by  the  con- 
sumer.” 

The  large  neighborhood  theatres  and 
first-run  houses  in  particular,  he  asserts, 
are  now  unable  to  meet  the  demand  for 
goods  in  the  15^  field. 

Just  as  the  “dime”  bar  is  on  the  march 
in  theatres  so  is  the  vending  of  candy 


ih  rough  automatic  dispensing  machines. 
(Indeed  the  whole  vending  industry  is  en- 
joying much  progress  as  is  reported  in  a 
news  story  in  this  issue  on  page  48.) 

More  and  more  theatre  operators,  it  is 
reported,  have  been  taking  advantage  of 
this  additional  means  of  increasing  refresh- 
ment revenue— particularly  by  placing  the 
machines  in  locations  away  from  the  main 
stand. 

Typical  of  this  trend  is  a recent  installa- 
tion in  Loew’s  Theatre  in  Rochester, 
N.  Y.,  on  the  mezzanine  floor,  as  shown  in 
a photograph  accompanying  this  article.  As 
arranged  by  the  theatre  manager,  Lester 
Pollock,  a whole  battery  of  machines  offers 
the  patrons  a selection  of  candies,  popcorn 
and  soft  drinks  and  cigarettes  without  the 
necessity  of  their  having  to  go  downstairs. 

Drink  syrup  is  stored  in  the  top  part  of 
the  cupboard  to  the  left  and  there  is  a re- 
ceptacle for  used  cups  at  the  bottom  of  it. 
To  the  right  of  the  popcorn  dispenser  there 
is  a storage  room  for  candy  and  popcorn. 
At  the  top  of  the  machines  there  is  a display 
in  neon  equipped  with  flashers  to  draw  at- 
tention to  the  products.  These  signs  are 
painted  in  blue  and  gray. 

While  the  candy  machines  in  this  Loew’s 
installation  vend  only  5^  products,  many 
operators  have  used  a combination  of  both 
“5(1;”  and  “10^”  candies  and  some  have 
sold  the  large-size  only  with  great  success. 


Nestle's.clellv^ers  wide  screen 
perl ormanc'e/iorsa  big ' 


WONDERFUL  NEW  COCONUT 

It  packs  ’em  in  for  that  rich  milk 
chocolate  that’s  crammed  with  fresh 
toasted  coconut.  Available  in  10^  size  only. 


Hestles 


MiLK-the  all  time  favorite  with  the  ALMOND  -Nestle’s  exclusive  blend  crunch  -all  ages  go  for  this  sur- 

rich  Nestle’s  flavor  that  sets  the  of  milk  chocolate  and  fresh  roasted  prise  bar  with  its  rnilk  chocolate 

standard  for  all  milk  chocolate.  almonds.  flavor  and  crisp,  crunchy  texture. 

MILK,  ALMOND  AND  CRUNCH  AVAILABLE  IN  Sc  AND  10c  SIZES  PACKED  100  BARS  TO  THE  CASE.  Sc  SIZE  NOT  AVAILABLE  ON  WEST  COAST. 

The  Nestle  Company,  Inc.,  2 William  St.,  White  Plains,  N.Y. 


44 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


New  beverage  trend  gives 
progressive  theatre  operators 
highest  refreshment  profits 


Donald 
- P'-esic 
•i~Cola 
St  57th 
i'ork  19 


^endaij 


“tepend 
Pfofx  t 


®erchaj 
°njy  n; 


Produi 


years 


- "t‘r" 

^ cost  DP 
=°”Parabie  c„, 


^pPeeshi 
•^3ini2y  j 


®°®e thing 
f^-.that®P 
i2£_drinks 


atso  qn 

tePorioa 


axJiib. 
use  th 


5 who 

''■egoii 


"'tshes 


tnued 


'^•'app/na^ 

The;., 


Read  tvhat  one 
of  Americals 
biggest  ^ 
operators  says 
about 

PepsuColaW: 

■* 


. . . and  the  same  is  happening  in  theatres  all  over  the  country! 


Check  your  own  operation. 

Refreshment  space  is  limited.  Traffic  must  turn  over  fast. 

To  get  the  top  return  from  your  refreshment  space,  sell  the 
brands  in  the  biggest  demand.  Pepsi -Cola  is  the  fastest  growing 
beverage  in  America.  It  turns  refreshment  space  into  sales 
for  you  at  a faster  rate  than  ever  before  in  soft  drink  history. 

Pepsi  can  boost  your  beverage  sales  and  profits  all  along 
the  line! 

Write  today  for  full  details. 


Pepsi-Cola  Company,  3 West  57th  Street,  New  York  19,  New  York 


I 


Do  You  Sometimes  Need 
2 Heads  and  4 Hands? 

LET  THE  MANLEY 

REFRESHERETTE® 

SOLVE  YOUR  PROBLEM 

Two  of  the  biggest 
sellers  in  your 
concession  are  hot 
dogs  and  cold 
drinks  — at  least 
they  should  be  if 
you  can  serve  them 
fast  enough!  Well, 
here's  the  machine 
you've  been  look- 
ing for.  One  machine  that  does  the  work 
of  two.  It's  the  new  Manley  REFRESHER- 
ETTE.  A combination  hot  dog  and  cold 
drink  machine  that  speeds  up  service, 
speeds  up  sales  and  makes  profits  soar. 

The  Refresherette  occupies  only  14  sq.  ft. 
of  floor  space  and  dispenses  thirst- 
quenching cold  drinks  and  delicious  hot 
dogs  . . . fast. 

Don't  wait  any  longer!  Write  today  for 
full  details  on  the  Manley  Refresherette 
and  find  out  how  you  can  make  more 
sales  . . . more  money.  Address:  Manley, 
Inc.,  1920  Wyandotte  St.,  Kansas  City  8, 
Missouri.  Dept.  MPH-1 56. 


an<f 

Some  advertisements  offer  literature  on 
the  product  advertised,  and  often  a coupon 
is  included  as  a convenient  means  of  pro- 
curing it.  Moreover,  The  Inquiry  Coupon 
Mart  supplied  on  page  50,  provides  a 
form  card  for  this  purpose.  . . . Or,  if  you 
do  not  see  what  you  want  advertised  in 
this  particular  issue,  you  may  write  the 
REFRESHMENT  MERCHANDISING  De- 
partment, Motion  Picture  Herald,  New 
York  20. 


I Coping  with  Sanitation  in 
Handling  Foods  in  Theatres 

O utlining  some  of  the  problems  in  insect  and  pest 
control  encountered  in  theatres  with  regard  to  refreshment  opera- 
tion and  suggesting  a program  of  preventive  control. 


By  EMMET  CHAMPION 

Director  of  Sanitation, 

Arwell,  Inc.,  Waukegan,  III. 

INDOOR  THEATRES  and 
drive-ins  are  vulnerable  to  many  and 
varied  sanitation  problems,  which  can  be- 
come very  costly  unless  we  are  able  to 
anticipate  them  and  plan  a program  of 
preventive  control.  Wherever  food  is 
handled,  prepared,  dispensed,  stored  or 
manufactured,  we  must  be  prepared  to 
cope  with  insect,  rodent  and  related  sani- 
tation problems. 

For  the  purpose  of  this  discussion,  we 
will  attempt  to  highlight  some  of  the  fac- 
tors involved  in  fly  control,  rodent  control, 
insect  control  and  other  sanitation  prob- 
lems encountered  in  indoor  theatres  and 
drive-ins,  with  particular  regard  to  the 
operation  of  food,  beverage  and  candy 


concessions.  Adequate  coverage  of  the 
basic  fundamentals  of  any  one  phase  of 
these  problems  requires  far  more  time  than 
this  presentation  permits.  Obviously,  there- 
fore, only  a very  condensed  and  simple 
review  of  insect  and  rodent  control  factors 
can  be  presented. 

By  far  the  most  important  factor  in  the 
control  of  pests  is  sanitation.  Without 
sanitation  any  program  is  doomed  to  failure 
from  the  start.  Actually,  sanitation  di- 
rectly affects  every  phase  involved  in  pest 
control. 

Let  us  begin  with  fly  control.  The  mere 
spraying  of  insecticides,  at  best,  will  only 
afford  temporary  relief.  First,  breeding 
must  be  prevented.  Flies  can  breed  much 
faster  than  you  can  kill  them ! Satisfactory 
fly  control  cannot  be  attained  without  basic 
sanitation — and  that  means  clean  up  of 
food  scraps — elimination  of  breeding 
media — proper  garbage  and  refuse  disposal 


i GIFTS  FOU  POPCORN  PURCHASERS  IN  CANADA 


POPCORN  BONUS  TIME — a promotional  scheme  in  which  patrons  were  offered  free  passes  to  next 
week's  show  and  children  supplied  with  tree  "pirate  hat  and  mask"  sets — was  announced  to  patrons  of 
the  Odeon  Parkdale  theatre  in  Toronto  by  this  stand  display  devised  by  Manager  Martin  White.  The 
passes  were  issued  to  patrons  having  a "lucky  number"  on  their  box,  with  the  winners  being  posted 
on  the  blackboard  at  left.  The  pirate  sets  were  given  every  child  buying  a box  of  popcorn  at  the  Sat- 
urday matinee  performance. 


46 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


NEW  SERIES  OF  CUPS  DESIGNED  FOR  THEATRES 


P'J 


Infroduction  of  a new 
series  of  cups  especially 
designed  for  theatres 
has  been  announced  by 
the  Dixie  Cup  Com- 
pany of  Easton,  Pa.  The 
cups  for  drinking  (see 
left)  feature  messages 
to  promote  theatre  at- 
tendance and  come  in 
five  sizes  and  five  colors. 
They  have  two-tone  de- 
signs in  lavender,  green, 
red,  blue  and  brown. 
Sizes  are  6,  7,  9,  12  and 
1 6 ounces.  At  the  far  left 
is  the  company's  new 
popcorn  cup  printed  in 
brown  and  yellow. 


— and  e.xclusion  through  screened  windows 
and  doors. 

In  order  to  intelligently  plan  effective 
control  measures,  we  must  know  some- 
thing about  the  variances  in  the  character- 
istics and  breeding,  resting  and  feeding 
habits  of  the  common  species  of  houseflies, 
blow  flies,  stable  flies  and  vinegar  gnats 
or  fruit  flies.  Then,  too,  we  must  know 
how  to  choose  and  apply  the  proper  insec- 
ticides for  outside  control  and  inside  use. 

Mosquito  control  is  still  another  trou- 
blesome and  e.xpensive  problem.  Here,  too, 
the  solution  is  not  a simple  one.  If  you 
don’t  use  the  proper  insecticide  formula- 
tion for  larvaciding  and  adulticiding,  your 
dollars  will  go  “down  the  drain.’’  Often, 
a professional  survey  by  a consulting  firm 
will  save  you  money  by  locating  the  sources 
of  breeding,  recommending  the  most  suit- 
able equipment,  materials  and  outlining  a 
program  to  follow. 

Fly  control  is  only  one  phase  of  insect 
control.  What  about  the  control  of  such 
common  insects  as  German,  American, 
Oriental,  and  brown-banded  roaches, 
waterbugs,  silverflsh,  ants  and  similar 
household  pests?  What  about  roach  re- 
sistance? That  is — roaches  that  have  be- 
come immune  to  normal  control  measures 
— which  has  become  a serious  and  costly 
problem.  Resistant  roaches  will  almost 
assuredly  require  professional  treatment. 

Other  insect  problems  you  will  be  faced 


with  are  the  stored  product  insects — the 
many  species  of  weevils,  confused  flour 
beetles,  saw-toothed  grain  beetles,  Indian 
meal  moths,  Mediterranean  flour  moths  and 
the  chocolate  moth.  These  are  the  insects 
that  may  attack  and  infest  your  candy, 
chocolate,  popcorn  and  other  confections. 

Sanitation  is  also  a prerequisite  of  insect 
control.  Good  housekeeping  is  the  back- 
bone of  every  sanitation  program.  Food 
spillage,  scraps  and  dormant  insect-sup- 


porting residues  must  be  removed,  not  only 
to  deny  insects  food  but  also  to  allow  ef- 
fective application  of  insecticides. 

What  about  such  fabric  pests  as  clothes 
moths,  carpet  beetles,  etc.,  that  attack, 
damage  or  destroy  rugs,  clothing  and  such 
upholstered  materials  as  theatre  seats, 
couches,  chairs  and  draperies?  And  then, 
we  have  structural  pests  like  termites, 
powder  post  beetles  and  carpenter  ants 
(Continued  on  page  50) 


LIKE  ALL 
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CAMDIES 


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MAKER.. 


MOVER..: 


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Here’s  a top  profit  combination  for  you.  . . . the  famous 
Heide  trade-mark  plus  the  taste  appeal  of  all-ways  popular 
Jujyfruits.  Now  backed  by  increased  television  adver- 
tising and  continuing  national  magazine  ads,  Jujyfruits 
belong  on  the  covmter  of  every  outlet  you  service.  Push 
them  for  aU  they’re  worth , . . they’re  worth  plenty  to  you! 


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BETTER  REFRESHMENT  MERCHANDISING 


47 


Merchandise  Mart 

★ news  of  products  for  the  theatre 
refreshment  service  and  their  manufacturers 


PlastiC'Coated  Cup 
For  Hot  Beverages 

A XEW  plastic-coated  cup 
for  serving  hot  beverages  has  been  placed 
on  the  market  by  the  Lily-Tulip  Cup  Cor- 
poration, New  ^'ork.  The  cup  is  called  the 
“China-Cote.” 

The  manufacturer  states  that  the  plas- 


tic coating  gives  the  cup  a “feel”  that  is 
“china-like”  in  addition  to  providing  it  with 
rigidity  and  strength.  It  is  also  stated  that 


laboratory  tests  of  the  cup  showed  that 
when  coffee  is  served  in  it,  no  “change  in 
the  flavor”  is  produced. 

The  cup  has  been  constructed  with  two 
features  that  are  designed  to  facilitate  its 
use  in  vending  machines.  These  are  a spe- 
cial precision-rolled,  plastic-coated  rim  and 
an  interlocking,  broad-base  bottom  to  as- 
sure “non-tip”  landing. 

The  cup  is  available  in  two  designs — for 
vending  use,  a brown-and-white  checked 
pattern  with  a conventionalized  brown-leaf 
overlay;  and  a white  leaf  pattern  against  a 
ceramic-tone  gold. 

Automatic  Vending 
Makes  Big  Strides 

CIGARETTES,  Candy  and 
soft  drinks  were  the  top-ranking  products 
in  sales  through  vending  machines  during 
1955,  according  to  a year-end  review  of 
that  industry  made  by  Robert  Z.  Greene, 
president  of  the  Rowe  Manufacturing 
Company,  Inc.  and  chairman  of  the  execu- 
tive committee  of  the  Automatic  Canteen 
Company  of  America. 

The  vending  industry,  which  recorded 
sales  of  one  and  three-quarter  billion  dol- 
lars in  1955,  made  giant  strides,  he  stated, 
as  added  consumer  acceptance  hiked  milk 
vending  sales,  machines  of  larger  capacity 
and  greater  compactness  were  produced, 
and  vendors  found  their  way  into  more  and 
more  factories  to  help  feed  employees. 


INCREASES  YOUR  BUSINESS  BECAUSE  IT 

Mates  popcorn  ^viays  befteri 

jJC  Adds  delicious  buttery  flavor 

5^  Brings  out  all  the  natural  goodness  of  the  corn 

^1^  Gives  popcorn  an  appetizing  butterdike 
appearance 

:centuates  and  intensifies  all  these 
wonderful  flavors 


AVAILABLE  AT  ALL  GOOD  POPCORN  SUPPLY  DEALERS 
The  Savorol  Co./  Popcorn  Bldg.,  Nashville,  Tenn. 


. . . about  lines  of  notev/orthy 
candy  bars  and  pack  special- 
ties for  theatre  sales. 


Two  "Five-Cent"  Bars 
From  Hoben  Corporation 

Two  new  "flve-cent"  candy 
bars,  the  "Coco-Bela"  and  the  "Chocolate 
Malted"  have  been  placed  on  the  market 
by  the  Hoben  Candy  Corporation,  Ashley, 
III.  Both  of  the  bars  are  packed  in  24  and 
120  counts. 

The  "Coco-Bela"  has  a center  of  dairy 


butter  caramel  with  coconut  and  fresh 
roasted  peanuts,  covered  with  rich  milk 
coating. 

The  "Chocolate  Malted"  has  a center  of 
chocolate  malted  milk  nougat  and  peanuts, 
topped  with  a layer  of  caramel  and  cov- 
ered with  a rich  milk  coating. 

Shipping  of  the  new  bars  was  begun  late 
in  November  following  extensive  rebuilding 
of  the  company's  plant  In  Ashley  to  ac- 
commodate new  machinery  required  for  full 
"automation"  of  Its  production  line.  Four 
complete  production  lines,  two  of  which  are 
presently  in  operation,  will  eventually  be 
utilized  In  the  revised  plant,  according  to 
F.  A.  Martoccioo,  president. 

Sales  of  the  two  new  bars  are  being  con- 
ducted mostly  through  brokers  at  the 
present  time.  Other  items  will  follow  as 
soon  as  the  additional  production  equip- 
ment is  installed.  Territories  also  will  be 
expanded  as  rapidly  as  production  permits, 
it  Is  stated  by  the  company. 


48 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


INTER  OUR  RIO  ' 

POPCORN 

CONTEST 


/rffA^im  ■■  A< 


PRIZES  TO  WINNERS 


r'jJtout/ 

nMpti 


A ''Do-It-Yourself'  Display  Promotes  Popcorn  and  Ice  Cream 


Popcorn  and  ice 
cream  were  energeti- 
cally promoted  at  the 
Oakwood  theatre  in 
Toronto,  Canada,  by 
the  elaborate  display 
at  right  as  conceived 
and  executed  in  true 
"do-it-yourself"  fashion 
by  Manager  A.  Easson 
(who  was,  incidentally, 
one  of  the  winners 
of  Motion  Picture 
Herald’s  first  merit 
awards  for  better  re- 
freshment merchandis- 
ing last  year). 

The  display  to  the 
right  of  the  stand  is 
animated;  it  is  5 feet 
high  by  2 feet  square. 

The  top  section  is  a 
representation  of  the 
inside  of  a theatre  with 
cardboard  figures  of  people  seated  watching  a screen.  The  screen 
itself  is  a 4-foot  "endless"  belt  of  sign-cotton  with  selling  copy  letters 
on  it  in  different  colors,  so  that  when  it  is  slowly  moved  up  it  gives 
the  effect  of  a creeping  trailer. 

A small  electric  motor  is  used  to  turn  4-inch  wood  rollers;  the  top 
roller  is  covered  with  fine  sandpaper  to  keep  the  sign  from  slipping 
and  two  showcase  lights  back  of  the  screen  illuminate  it.  In  the 
photo  the  trailer  is  stopped  at  a frame  promoting  "Super  Pufft" 
popcorn;  other  copy  sells  Borden's  ice  cream  bars  and  25c-size  pop- 
corn boxes  (these  "take-home"  boxes  are  shown  on  top  of  the  display). 

The  bottom  of  the  display  has  its  own  small  motor  to  rotate  a 
turntable  slowly.  Displayed  in  the  center  of  the  turntable  is  a colored 
container  of  popcorn  surrounded  by  Borden's  ice  cream  bars  with 
the  wrappers  open  on  the  end  to  reveal  the  product.  These  bars 
are  of  wood  painted  dark  brown  but  "look  like  the  real  thing,"  Mr. 
Easson  states.  This  display  is  backed  by  a mirror  and  hidden  lights 
above.  Constructing  these  displays  took  about  35  hours  of  his  time, 
and  he  worked  on  them  at  odd  hours  and  Sundays  at  home. 


In  preparing  the  pennants,  Mr.  Easson  first  felt  he  had  "pulled  a 
boner"  as  he  purchased  remnants  of  color  felt  in  different  colors  and 
planned  to  have  them  stenciled  at  a sign  shop.  When  he  was  told 
that  this  couldn't  be  done,  but  that  they  would  have  to  "make  it  a 
silk  screen  job"  which  is  expensive,  he  resorted  to  "do-it-yourself." 

He  explains  that  he  first  made  a layout  of  the  word  "popcorn"  on 
cardboard  and  cut  it  out  with  a sharp  knife.  Then  on  an  odd  night 
home  from  the  theatre  he  started  in  at  5 p.m.  and  by  midnight  had 
32  pennants  finished  with  his  stencil — and  none  of  them  spoiled!  He 
used  thick  white  paint,  and  the  job  was  perfect. 

As  a further  promotional  device  tor  popcorn,  Mr.  Easson  staged 
a coloring  contest  for  youngsters  with  prizes  of  silver  dollars  and 
admission  passes.  The  sign  announcing  the  contest  is  reproduced 
at  top  right  and  below  is  a close-up  of  the  back  bar  sign. 


BETTER  REFRESHMENT  MERCHANDISING 


49 


Coping  with  Sanitation 


{Continued  from  page  47) 

that  ma\'  seriously  weaken  or  even  destroy 
wooden  floors,  beams  and  building  foun- 
dations ? 

And  how  about  rodent  control  ? Do  you 
know  that  one  single  pair  of  rats,  unmo- 
lested and  with  their  offspring,  can  give 
rise  to  1500  rats  in  a year’s  time?  And  do 
you  realize  these  same  rats  will  destroy, 
contaminate  and  consume  $15,000  worth 
of  food  annually  ? Do  30U  know  that  mice 
are  often  more  difficult  to  control  than 
rats — because  they  can  live,  breed  and  de- 
velop several  generations  within  a 10  to  20 
foot  radius  of  their  harborage?  Rodents 
present  a serious  filth  contamination  prob- 
lem. There  are  over  100  million  and  1 
billion  mice  in  this  country  today.  One 
single  pair  of  mice  will  deposit  672  drop- 


pings in  a week's  time.  One  single  pair 
of  rats  will  void  980  droppings  as  well  as 
224  cubic  centimeters  of  urine  in  a week’s 
time. 

Sanitation  is  also  an  absolute  must  in 
rodent  control.  Rodents  must  be  denied 
food  and  shelter.  Proper  garbage  disposal, 
elimination  of  harborages,  both  inside  and 
outside,  good  storage  practices,  rodent- 
proofing of  doors  and  other  avenues  of 
entry — these  are  all  integrated  factors  in  a 
successfully  carried  out  program  of  rodent 
control. 

Now  this  all  adds  up  to  quite  a prob- 
lem-— fly  control,  mosquito  control,  insect 
control,  rodent  control,  sanitation.  What 
can  we  do  about  it?  Hire  professional  pest 
control  services?  Buy  insecticides  and 
spraying  equipment?  Yes,  of  course,  we 
can  do  all  these  things — but  professional 
services  and  the  use  of  insecticides  are  only 
a partial  solution  to  the  problem.  Sanita- 
tion is  the  axis  around  which  a successful 


program  revolves.  Sanitation  spells  the 
difference  between  mere  reduction  of  insect 
and  rodent  problems  and  preventive 
control. 

So  j'ou  can  readily  see  that  sanitation  is 
the  key  to  pest  problems.  Now  sanitation 
requires  organization.  You  must  have  a 
program — and  your  program  must  be  com- 
plete in  every  respect.  If  your  program  is 
not  complete,  it  will  nullify  much  of  the 
good  work  that  has  been  done,  and  you 
will  not  derive  optimum  returns  from  your 
sanitation  expenditures. 

The  magnitude  and  comple.xity  of  these 
problems  are  usually  bejond  the  scope  of 
the  average  layman.  Assuredly  there  is  no 
magic  formula  for  their  solution.  How- 
ever, 3’our  sanitation  program  can  be 
either  a definite  liability,  or  a tangible  asset. 
This  will  depend  largely  upon  your  active 
interest,  j'our  ability  to  recognize  and 
understand  the  problems  involved,  the  nec- 
essary “know-how”  for  establishing  cor- 
rective measures,  employee  training  and 
co-operation,  adequate  supervision,  and 
\’our  ability  to  plan,  organize  and  sustain 
a truly  effective  program. 

Now  the  question  arises — how  and 
where  can  we  acquire  all  the  necessary 
knowledge  and  “know-how”  to  success- 
fully administrate  a preventive  sanitation 
program?  The  Arwell  organization, 
through  its  consulting  staff,  has  been  instru- 
mental in  developing  several  industry- 
sponsored  sanitation  programs.  This  is  a 
relatively  new  approach  and  has  been  prac- 
ticed with  a high  degree  of  success  in  the 
dairy,  confectionery  and  baking  industries. 

The  aho'Ve  article  is  adapted  from  a speech 
made  by  Mr.  Champion  at  the  eleventh  annual 
convention  of  the  Popcorn  and  Concessions 
.d ssociation  {formerly  the  International  Pop~ 
corn  .4 ssociation)  in  Chicago  last  November. 
.Irvell,  Inc.  is  one  of  the  largest  and  oldest 
firms  of  sanitation  consultants  and  general  pest 
control  service  organizations  in  the  country, 
maintaining  a corps  of  over  200  skilled  pest 
control  specialists  operating  out  of  61  branch 
offices. 


To  Theatre  and 
Concession  Managers — 

Gain  deserved  recognition  for  your 
better  refreshment  merchandising  ideas. 
Make  yourself  eligible  for  Motion  Picture 
Herald's  Special  Merit  Awards  by  send- 
ing in  reports  on  how  you  have  applied 
showmanship  and  built  business  at  your 
refreshment  stand.  Make  the  reports  de- 
tailed. 

Include  photos  of  your  stand  and  sam- 
ples of  any  printed  matter. 

Reports  considered  by  the  editors  to 
be  of  interest  to  readers  will  be  pub- 
lished, with  due  credit. 

From  the  published  reports,  selections 
will  be  made  tor  citations.  Citation- 
holders  qualify  as  finalists  for  the  annual 
Special  Merit  Awards. 

Send  your  entries  to;  The  Editor, 
Better  Refreshment  Merchandising 
Department,  Motion  Picture  Herald. 


Better  Refreshment  Merehandi 
Advertiser's  index  and  Inqui 


ADVERTISERS'  PAGE  AND  REFERENCE  NUMBERS: 

- 

Ref.  No. 

Page 

No. 

1— THE  COCA-COLA  COMPANY. 

42 

2— HENRY  HEIDE,  INC. 

47 

3_MANLEY.  INC 

46 

4— THE  NESTLE  COMPANY,  INC.. 

44 

5— THE  PEPSI-COLA  COMPANY 

45 

6— THE  SAVOROL  COMPANY 

48 

REFERENCES  FOR  ADDITIONAL  INQUIRY: 

100 — Beverage  dispensers,  coin 

109 — Custard  freezers 

1 18 — Popcorn  machines 

101 — Beverage  dispensers,  counter 

1 10 — Films,  snack  bar  adv 

1 19 — Popcorn  warmers 

102 — Candy  bars 

1 1 1 — Food  specialties 

120 — Popping  oils 

103 — Candy  Specialties 

1 12 — French  fryers 

121 — Scales,  coin  operated 

104— Candy  machines 

113 — Grilles,  franks,  etc. 

122 — Soda  fountains 

105 — Cash  drawers 

1 14 — Gum,  chewing 

123 — Soft  drinks,  syrup 

106 — Cigarette  machines 

115 — Gum  machines 

1 24 — Showcases 

1 07 — Coffee-makers 

1 16 — Ice  cream  cabinets 

1 25 — Vending  carts 

108 — Cups  & containers,  paper 

117 — Mixers,  malteds,  etc. 

126 — Warmers,  buns,  etc. 

INQUIRY  COUPON 

Vo  BE*ER  REFRESHMENT  MERCHANDISING  Departme...j 
A-Hon  Picture  Herald,  1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New  York  20,  N. 

'm  interested  in  products  as  indicated  by  the  reference  m 
r . w - a ,d  would  like  to  receive  literature  concerning  the. 


. Theatre 


50 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  7.  1956 


i 


icckiH^  fikeatt 


in  Theatre  Design 
in  Projection  Methods 
in  Popular  Exhibition 


JANUARY  1956 


“The  Voire  of  the  Drive-In” 

1207  Cherry  St.,  Toledo  4,  Ohio 


yishing  for  a 

BETTER  ™ SPEAKER? 


You  don’t  have  to  cast  all  around  the 
country  for  a good  speaker!  Just  drop  a 
line  to  your  Independent  Theatre  Supply 
Dealer  and  ask  for  a demonstration  of 
EPRAD  speakers.  Once  you  compare  EPRAD 
speakers  with  those  of  any  other  manufac- 
turer you’re  sold!  Their  sweet  sound,  incom- 
parahle  beauty,  reasonable  price,  and  lowest 
maintenance  cost  make  them  the  best  catch. 


Hear  the  earliest  and  latest  in 
transcribed  sound. 

Edison  s early  cylinder  phonograph 
iviii  be  on  display  and  demonstrated  at 

the  ISatiomil  Allied  Drive-In  Conven- 
tion., Cleveland — Booths  41  and  42. 


WHEX  DECOR  MEAXS 


Today,  the  theatre  that  draws  the  crowds  is  the 
theatre  that  offers  more  than  entertainment.  With 
ever-increasing  competition,  your  theatre’s  hig 
opportunity  is  to  offer  patrons  a thrilling  change 
of  environment.  To  women,  especially,  this  can 
mean  a delightful  escape  from  day-hy-day  sur- 
roundings. And  the  thrill  of  stepping  into  a 
beautifully  decorated  theatre  lobby,  in  high  antici- 
pation of  a pleasant  evening,  cannot  be  duplicated. 

That’s  why  theatres  like  the  Music  Hall  in 


Seattle  get  a bigger  share  of  business.  Striking 
decor  such  as  this — based  on  beautiful  Gulistan 
Carpet — invites  customers  and  builds  repeat  busi- 
ness. This  is  Gulistan’s  colorful  Night  Blooming 
Cereus,  especially  suited  to  the  exciting  tempo 
of  the  theatre. 

Gulistan  has  many  other  fine  carpets  styled  to 
provide  the  proper  background  for  your  business 
— your  bank,  your  store,  your  office — or  your 
own  home. 


Carpet  executed  by  B.  F.  Shearer  Company 


Some  outstanding  Gulistan  installations:  Radio  City  Music  Hall,  N.Y.,  Ambassador  Hotel,  N.Y.,  Tarantino’s,  San  Francisco. 
MADE  IN  THE  U.  S.  A.  BY  AMERICAN  CRAFTSMEN  • A.  & M.  KARAGHEUSIAN,  INC.,  295  FIFTH  AVENUE,  NEW  YORK  16,  N.  Y. 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


3 


For  repeat-patronage 

MAGNETISM 

on  your  screen  . . . 


...depend  on  the 


CinemaScope  production,  "The  Rains  of  Ranchipur," 
filmed  with  B&L  CinemaScope  Camera  Lenses. 


PERFECT-PICTURE 

PAIR!  The  better  they  see,  the  more 

they’ll  enjoy  the  movies  you 
show  . . . and  the  oftener  they’ll  come  back. 
Insist  on  the  B&L  Perfect-Picture  Pair  for 


Bausch  & Lomb 
Super  Cinephor 
Projection 
Lenses 


Bausch  & Lomb 
CinemaScope 
Projection 
Lenses 


today’s  clearest,  brightest  full-screen  views. 
Complete  line  for  all  projectors  . . . from 
neighborhood  theatre  to  largest  drive-in  . . . 
for  Wide  Screen,  CinemaScope,  SuperScope. 


SEE  THE  BIG  DIFFERENCE  . . . FREE 
DEMONSTRATION!  Write  for  demonstra- 
tion, and  for  Catalogs  E-118,  E-123  ar'tt 
E-141.  Bausch  & Lomb  Optical  Co.,  67901 
St.  Paul  St.,  Rochester  2,  N.  Y.  ( In  Can- 
ada, General  Theatre  Supply,  Toronto.) 


Academy  of  Motion  Picture  Arts  and  Sciences 
Honorary  Award  for  Optical  Service  to  the  Industry 


BAUSCH  & LOMB 

SINCt  ^^11^18  53 


Pecfile 
the  ykeaite 

AND  OF  BUSINESSES  SERVING  THEM 

• 

Howard  A.  heatley,  territory  sales  manager 
for  a number  of  years  in  Los  Angeles  for 
James  Lees  and  Sons  Company,  Bridgeport,  Pa., 
manufacturers  of  carpeting,  has  been  appointed 
to  head  the  firm’s  new  Middle  Eastern  territory. 
The  new  division  includes  Pennsylvania,  Dela- 
ware, Maryland,  Virginia,  and  the  District  of 
Columbia.  A native  of  Denver,  Mr.  Keatley 
was  a retail  salesman  for  Daniels  and  Fishers 
there  and  covered  a wholesale  territory  for 
Bigelow-Sanford  before  joining  James  Lees  in 
1947. 


John  Gardner,  owner  of  the  Turnpike  drive-in 
at  Albany,  N.  Y.,  reports  that  his  new  outdoor 
operation,  the  Lfnadilla,  will  be  ready  there 
for  an  opening  in  April. 

Bob  Adams  has  sold  the  Skyline  drive-in, 
Rawlins,  Wyo.,  to  the  Wyoming  Amusement 
Corporation. 

The  Studio  Theatre  Corporation,  Detroit,  has 
announced  plans  to  remodel  and  reopen  the 
long-closed  Cinema  theatre  there.  The  art 
house  will  be  renamed  the  World. 

Art  Jennings,  manager  of  the  Manchester 
drive-in  at  Bolton  Notch,  Conn.,  has  been  ap- 
pointed winter  relief  manager  for  Menschell- 
Calvocoressci  Theatres,  Hartford. 

Jack  Lightner  has  been  appointed  manager 
of  the  Fox  theatre,  LaPorte,  Ind.,  which  was 
reopened  Christmas  Day  by  Indiana-Illinois 
Theatres. 

A.  L.  Royal  Theatres,  Meridan.  Miss.,  has 
announced  plans  to  keep  the  Waynesboro  drive- 
in  in  that  Mississippi  town  open  on  weekends 
all  winter  long. 

E.  Valentine  has  been  appointed  to  succeed 
Mrs.  Zelma  Plato  as  manager  of  the  Agnew 
theatre  in  that  Oklahoma  town. 

L.  E.  Cooley,  Sr.  has  resigned  from  his  posi- 
tion as  general  manager  in  charge  of  operations 
at  the  Lombard,  111.,  plant  of  Raytone  Screen 
Corporation.  His  resignation  was  effective  De- 
cember 31st,  and  he  is  presently  taking  a vaca- 
tion prior  to  announcing  future  plans.  Mr. 
Cooley  has  had  32  years’  experience  in  the 
manufacture  of  projection  screens  and  acces- 
sories. 

Don  McNally,  Vermont  exhibitor  with  two 
drive-ins,  has  leased  two  indoor  theatres — the 
Auditorium  in  Orleans,  and  the  Memorial  in 
Barton,  Mass. 

New  Heywood-Wakefield  auditorium  seats 
have  been  installed  in  the  Gorham  theatre  in 
Gorham,  N.  H.,  formerly  known  as  the  Ritz 
and  renamed  following  extensive  alterations. 
The  latter  also  included  installations  for  re- 
producing four-track  magnetic  stereophonic 
sound,  air-conditioning  and  new  carpets  and 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


ENC€)RE  COMFORT 

contributes  to  steady,  profitable  patronage 

AT  THE  BABYLON 


Recently  rebuilt  fol- 
lowing a fire.  Associated  Pru- 
dential’s Babylon  Theatre  on  Long 
Island  is  completely  reseated  with 
Hey wood-Wakefield  “Encore” 
chairs.  The  utmost  comfort  is  pro- 
vided by  the  new  Formed  Rubber 
Contour  Cushions.  The  Contour 
conforms  to  the  occupant’s  body 
and  has  the  resiliency  of  three 
inches  of  formed  rubber  over  heli- 
cal construction  springs. 

In  the  competition  for  comfort, 
competition  both  from  other  the- 
atres and  from  TV  armchairs  at 
home.  Hey  wood’s  “Encore”  is 
helping  the  Babylon  maintain  a 
capacity  box  office.  Heywood- 
Wakefield  seating  would  be  a 
profitable  investment  in  comfort 
for  you,  too. 


Grey  and  black  brick,  glass  and  white 
marble  adorn  the  front  of  the  rebuilt 
Babylon  Theatre.  Architect:  Maurice 
Bor  nick,  New  York. 


The  balcony  contains  300  TC  701  de  luxe  “Encore” 
chairs  with  steel  roil  spring  backs  spaced  39"  back-to-back. 


7 /!('  nain  lloor  contains  600  TC  700  “Encore”  chairs  spaced 
36"  bacn-to-back.  All  chairs  are  upholstered  in  malibu  two- 
toned  striped  velour,  rose  in  the  balcony  and  blue  on  the  main  floor. 


HEYWOOD-WAKEFIELD  COMPANY,  Theatre  Seating  Division,  Menominee,  Michigan  • Sales  Offices:  Baltimore  • Chicago  • New  York 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


5 


your  New 
Drive-In  NOW 
and  let  us 

HELP 


When  it  comes  to  drive-ins  The  Ballan- 
tyne  Company  has  always  taken  pride 
in  being  more  than  just  a manufacturer 
of  sound  and  projection  equipment. 
We  feel  that  countless  owners  and 
operators  want  help  and  advice  on  how 
to  build  a better,  more  economical 
drive-in. 

That’s  why  we  offer  these  services. 

If  you  have  purchased  land  for  a new 
drive-in,  just  send  us  the  general  plan 
and  elevations.  Without  cost  to  tou 
we  will  lay  out  the  entire  theatre. 
If  you  need  layouts  for  a projection 
booth,  a refreshment  area  or  ticket 
entrance,  as  illustrated  above,  we’ll 
be  glad  to  furnish  them  without 
charge.  And  of  course,  we  furnish 
you  with  complete  wiring  diagrams 
as  well. 


Now  is  not  too  soon  to  plan  for  next 
season.  Take  just  two  minutes  and 
drop  us  a line  if  you’re  planning  a new 
drive-in.  We’d  like  to  help. 


Originators  of  the  tomplete  pack- 
age for  the  Drive-ln  Theatres 


1712  Jackson  Street  Omaha,  Nebraska 

6 


stage  draperies.  The  theatre  is  owned  by  John 
Voudoukis. 

Jack  Lykes,  manager  of  the  Colony  theatre 
in  Toledo,  Ohio,  for  the  past  14  years,  has  left 
the  industry.  He  is  now  in  charge  of  public 
relations  and  new  car  salesmen  for  the  Hertz- 
feld  Oldsmobile  Company  in  Toledo. 

Claude  Belknap,  doorman  at  the  Southern 
theatre  in  Columbus,  Ohio,  for  23  years,  has 
retired.  Prior  to  that  position  he  was  at  the 
Majestic  theatre  (also  in  Columbus)  for  20 
years. 

Clifford  Shearon  has  reopened  his  Norka 
theatre  in  Akron,  Ohio,  following  a remodelling 
program,  which  included  a new  wide-screen  and 
new  projectors. 

Charles  Jones  has  been  appointed  manager 
of  the  Art  theatre,  Hartford,  Conn.,  an  opera- 
tion of  the  Hartford  Theatres  Circuit,  replacing 
Sidney  Brenner,  who  resigned. 

W.  F.  Sonneman  has  sold  the  Concord  and 
Apollo  theatres  in  Springdale,  Ark.,  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  J.  T.  Hitt,  who  also  own  and  operate  the 
Cozy  and  Plaza  theatres  in  Bentonville,  Ark. 

Robert  F.  Walker  has  resigned  as  manager  of 
Lockwood  & Gordon’s  Castle  theatre  in  Provi- 
dence, R.  I.,  to  enter  another  line  of  business. 

Joseph  Charles  Dougherty,  manager  of  the 
69th  Street  and  Tower  theatres  in  Upper  Darby, 
Pa.,  last  month  observed  two  anniversaries — 
his  56th  year  in  the  theatre  industry  and  his 
golden  wedding  anniversary. 

C.  J.  Bachman,  who  was  chief  engineer  of 
Stanley-Warner  Theatres’  Newark,  N.  J.,  zone 
for  24  years,  has  joined  the  Montgomery  En- 
gineering Company,  Jersey  City,  distributor  for 
Carrier  air-conditioners  in  New  Jersey.  In  his 
new  position  he  will  be  primarily  concerned 
with  sales.  Before  joining  Montgomery,  Mr. 
Bachman  was  with  the  Fairchild  Recording  and 
Equipment  Company. 

Gaston  J.  Bureau,  Jr.  has  resigned  as  presi- 
dent of  Paramount  Gulf  Theatres,  Inc.,  New 
Orleans,  thus  terminating  over  43  years  of  serv- 
ice in  the  motion  picture  industry.  He  began 
his  career  with  the  Fichtenberg  Enterprises  in 
1912  as  secretary  to  the  late  William  H.  Guer- 
inger.  Mr.  Dureau  later  joined  the  Saenger 
Amusement  Company  in  1917,  following  their 
purchase  of  the  Fichtenberg  group  and  con- 
tinued with  them  and  their  successor  companies 
as  buyer  and  booker  for  35  years.  He  will 
continue  with  Paramount  Gulf  Theatres  in  an 
advisory  and  consultative  capacity.  He  was 
honored  at  a testimonial  dinner  last  month  in 
the  Roosevelt  Hotel  in  New  Orleans  by  a 
group  of  personal  friends  both  in  and  out  of 
the  industry.  Arrangements  for  the  dinner  were 
made  by  Page  M.  Baker,  chief  barker  of  New 
Orleans  Variety  Tent,  C.  James  Briant  and 
Lucas  Connor.  Abe  Berenson  was  toastmaster 
and  E.  V.  Richards,  Jr.  was  honorary  chairman. 

January  Capone,  formerly  assistant  manager 
of  the  Melrose  Park  theatre,  Chicago,  has  been 
appointed  manager.  The  theatre  was  recently 
purchased  by  the  ALB  Theatre  Corporation. 

E.  M.  Loew’s  Theatre’s  newest  drive-in,  the 
Gulf  Stream,  in  Hollandale,  Fla.,  was  opened 
last  month.  The  manager  is  Jim  Frazier,  who 
was  transferred  from  Loew’s  Strand  theatre  in 
Asheville,  N.  C. 


R.  L.  Bailey,  ow»er  of  the  Eagle  theatre  and 
the  Bailey  drive-in,  both  in  Blountstown,  Fla., 
last  month  celebrated  25  years  in  the  industry. 

Boris  Bernadi  has  been  appointed  new  man- 
aging director  of  the  Teck  theatres  in  Buffalo, 
N.  Y.,  that  city’s  showcase  for  Cinerama  films. 

James  Kennedy  has  been  appointed  manager 
of  the  new  Skyline  drive-in  at  Brighton,  Colo. 
Out  of  the  industry  for  some  time,  he  formerly 
managed  a theatre  in  Douglas,  Wyo. 

Louis  M.  Crippen  has  been  appointed  city 
manager  for  Syndicate  Theatres  in  Elwoed,  Ind. 

Cecil  Cohen,  who  operates  the  Murray  Hill 
and  Dixie  theatres,  in  Jacksonville,  Fla.,  has 
announced  plans  to  construct  a new  indoor 
theatre  in  a suburban  shopping  district  there. 

The  Loma  theatre  in  Burbank,  Calif.,  was 
damaged  during  a fire  last  month,  forcing  owner 
Charles  Minor  to  close  it  for  repairs. 

Several  managerial  changes  were  made  at  Fox 
West  Coast  theatres  last  month  following  the 
transfer  of  E.  B.  Abrams,  manager  of  the  Loyola 
theatre,  to  the  refreshment  department  of  the 
home  office,  succeeding  George  Sheldon,  who 
retired.  Taking  over  at  the  Loyola  was  Stephen 
Smolak,  moved  from  the  Academy  in  Ingle- 
wood; Robert  Burdick  went  to  the  .4cademy 
from  the  Rialto  in  South  Pasadena;  H.  J.  Kale- 
feld  from  the  Strand,  Pasadena,  to  the  Rialto 
and  Howard  Willis  to  the  Strand  from  the 
Maywood,  which  has  been  closed. 

The  Joy,  Regent  and  Ellis  theatres  in  Cleve- 
land, Miss.,  owned  by  Mr.  and  .Mrs.  J.  T.  Ellis 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  George  Davis,  have  been  sold 
to  a circuit  operated  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  B.  F. 
Jackson,  Mrs.  Valeria  Gullett  and  C.  J.  Collier. 

The  Bayou  Land  drive-in  at  Barton,  La.,  was 
scheduled  to  be  reopened  on  January  5th,  fol- 
lowing remodeling  by  owner  Lewis  H.  Cox. 

William  Blair  has  reopened  his  Mecca  theatre 
in  Crescent  City,  Calif.,  following  remodeling, 
which  included  new  carpeting  and  seats  and  a 
wide-screen. 

Charles  W hittenburg  has  remodeled  the  old 
Jewell  theatre  in  Poplar  Bluff,  Mo.,  which  has 
a seating  capacity  of  400.  Modernization  in- 
cluded new  seats  throughout. 

A fire  caused  severe  damage  to  the  Crosstown 
theatre  in  Memphis,  Tenn.,  recently. 

Stavros  Claros  has  been  appointed  manager 
of  the  Star  theatre  in  Hartford,  Conn. 

A I Swelt  has  been  named  manager  of  Stanley 
Warner’s  Palace  theatre  in  Norwich,  Conn., 
succeeding  Phil  Allaire,  who  resigned. 

Freeman  Parson  has  begun  construction  of  a 
new  350-car  drive-in  theatre  at  Sauk  Centre, 
Minn.,  which  he  plans  to  open  in  the  Spring. 

Henry  Quartemont  has  been  appointed  man- 
ager of  the  recently  remodeled  Lyric  theatre  in 
Stevenspoint,  Wise.,  by  Grant  Enterprises. 

Jack  Golladay,  manager  of  the  Kennedy  and 
Princess  theatres  in  Kirksville,  Mo.,  for  the 
past  four  years,  has  been  transferred  to  manage 
the  Lincoln  theatre  in  Springfield,  111.,  by  the 
Fox  Midwest  Theatre  Corporation.  He  has 
been  succeeded  at  the  Kirksville  theatres  by 
E.  R.  Kincaid  of  Brookfield,  Mo. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


On  America’ 


and  Main  Highways 


A Fresno.  California  installation  by 
B.  F.  Shearer  Co.,  San  Francisco. 


— YOU  SEE  MORE  WAGNER 
THEATRE  ATTRACTION  PANELS 
THAN  ANY  OTHER  KIND! 


That's  because  theatremen  everywhere  realize  that  a good,  changeable  copy  board  is  their 
all-important  point-of-sale  business  getter. 


Wagner  attraction  paneis  are  avaiiable  in  any  size,  and  are  readiiy  serviceabie  without 
removing  frames. 

You  also  have  a wider  selection  of  sizes  and  coiors  when  you  use  Wagner  changeable 
letters.  Immovable  by  wind  or  vibration,  yet  easier  to  change. 


If  you're  building  or  remodeling,  you'd  better  have 
the  Wagner  catalog. 


Send  the  coupon  now! 


WAGNER  SIGN  SERVICE,  INC. 

218  S.  Hoyne  Avenue  * Chicago  12,  Illinois 

Please  send  BIG  free  catalog  on  Wagner  show-selling 
equipment. 

NAME 

TH  EATRE. 

STREET 

CITY  & STATE 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


7 


the  (J(m  £ook.,. 


THE  IMPERIAL  LOGE  CHAIR 
THE  ACME  OF  SOLID  COMFORT 


Ideal  offers  the  most  complete  line  of  theatre' seating.  Write  now 
for  illustrated  literature.  Free  plaxming  service. 


motion  picture  herald,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


For  JANUARY  195B 


GEORGE  SCHUTZ,  Editor 


Stereophonic  Sound 
Proven  Exploitable 


EDITORIAL  INDEX: 


THEATRE  DESIGN  IN  THE  NEW  TECHNIQUES,  by  Ben  Scblanger...  10 

A WAY  TO  SIMPLIFY  THE  NEW  PROJECTION,  by  G/o  Qagliardi 11 

ADDING  GLAMORSCOPE  TO  OUR  TECHNIQUES,  by  Curtis  Mees 14 

STUNT  FOR  KID  INTEREST:  A TOUR  OF  THE  THEATRE,  by  Charlie  Jones 28 

DRIVE-IN  department: 


NEW  "WALK-IN"  THEATRE  FOR  A SMALL  DRIVE-IN  (CLERVUE  DRIVE-IN, 


CLERMONT,  FLA.)  30 

ABOUT  PRODUCTS  18 

ABOUT  PEOPLE  OF  THE  THEATRE 4 


BETTER  THEATRES  is  published  the  first  week  at  the  month,  with  each  regular 
monthly  issue  a bound-in  section  of  Motion  Picture  Herald;  and  in  an  annual 
edition,  the  Market  Guide  Number,  which  is  published  under  its  own  covers  in 
March  as  Section  Two  of  the  Herald, 

• 

QUIGLEY  PUBLICATIONS,  Rockefeller  Center,  New  York  20,  N.  Y.,  Circle  7-3100. 
Ray  Gallo,  Advertising  Manager.  HOLLYWOOD:  Yucca-Vine  Building;  HOIlywood 
7-2145.  CHICAGO:  Urben  Farley  & Co.,  120  S.  La  Salle  St.;  Financial  6-3074. 


Stereophonic  sound  has  gathered  sup- 
porters steadily  with  its  use  in  the  theatre. 
It  could  always  be  commended  theoreti- 
cally. To  justify  it  in  practical  application 
was  not  easy  in  the  face  of  its  cost.  One 
can  hear  pretty  much  what  one  wants  to 
hear  when  the  sound  is  a matter  of  dollars. 
The  issue  was  also  confused  by  the  quality 
of  “directionalism” — this  tended  to  deter- 
mine whether  stereophonic  sound  was 
superfluous  or  not. 

That  function  is  essential  or  expendable 
largely  according  to  the  way  scenes  are 
handled.  If  you  concentrate  dramatic  ac- 
tion in  the  middle  of  the  screen,  and  make 
the  source  of  each  type  of  sound  pictorially 
obvious,  stereophonic  technique  is  not 
critically  necessary  for  angular  location, 
or  “directionalism.”  But  in  such  practice 
you  have  restrictions  of  portrayal  compar- 
able to  those  the  new  techniques  are  try- 
ing to  get  away  from. 

The  other  qualities  of  stereophonic 
sound  which  contribute  to  a convincing 
illusion  are  not  to  be  so  readily  picked  out. 
Positioning  in  depth,  fidelity  of  tones  in 
speech  and  instrument  — such  characteris- 
tics form  a composite  impression  of  reality 
which  thousands  of  theatre  patrons  have 
come  to  miss  when  ordinary  single-chan- 
nel reproduction  is  employed. 

Testimony  to  this  effect  has  been  given 
us  by  many  a theatre  owner  and  manager. 
A short  time  ago  came  the  complaint,  “We 
went  to  the  expense  of  installing  stereo- 
phonic sound  and  now  we  have  trouble 
getting  anything  but  optical  prints.  You 
announce  the  stereophonic  sound  and  then 
give  them  what  they  have  always  had. 
Don  t think  your  patrons  don’t  know  the 
difference!” 

“There  are  many  people,”  writes  a man- 
ager, “who  are  music  lovers  and  know 
quality  when  they  hear  it,  and  that  is  where 
stereophonic  sound  comes  in.  These  are 


days  of  hi-fi  music  and  you  certainly  get 
that  in  magnetic  recording  and  stereo 
sound.  And  certainly  any  screen  45  feet 
and  more  in  width  gives  directional  sound 
automatically.  The  average  patron  knows 
that. 

“A  good  example  of  the  above  occurred 
not  too  long  ago.  A friend  of  mine  told 
me  that  his  father  had  not  been  to  the 
movies  in  well  over  a year.  Recently  he 
had  gone  and  he  came  home  raving  over 
the  fact  that  the  talk  came  from  that  por- 
tion of  the  screen  where  the  actor  or  action 


was  taking  place.  Certainly  if  this  was 
noticed  by  an  average  person  who  knew 
nothing  about  stereophonic  sound,  it  is 
bound  to  be  noted  by  others.  I think  the 
superior  quality  we  get  from  stereophonic 
sound  makes  it  belong  as  a part  of  the 
modern  day  wide-screen  projection.” 
Today  one  can  say  that  three-channel 
screen  reproduction  has  proved  its  exploit- 
able value  in  the  field,  and  a fourth  track 
for  a surround  system  seems  to  us  just 
what  the  doctor  ordered  for  the  score. 

— G.  S. 


9 


THE  INDUSTRY’S  fine  effort  to  improve  the  physical 
quality  of  the  screen  performance  is  entering  its  fourth 
year.  To  he  more  than  a pretension  it  had  to  be  disrup- 
tive and  it  had  to  he  given  time.  Many  more  months, 
adding  up  to  how  many  years  we  do  not  know,  will  be 
required  for  the  research  and  trial  necessary  to  prove 


By  BEN  SCHLANGER 

Theatre  Architect  and  Consultant 


Theatre  Design  in 
the  New  Techniques 

why  the  time  has  arrived  to  release  new  construction  and 
continuing  development  of  the  wide-screen  format  from 
the  restrictions  of  past  practices  in  auditorium  planning. 


THE  PRINCIPLES  of 
motion  picture  theatre 
design  have  become  so 
drastically  altered  by 
the  new  cinematogra- 
phy and  projection 
that  it  would  seem  wise 
now  to  begin  consid- 
ering changes.  While 
conditions  in  the  in- 
dustry certainly  do  not  portend  any  sub- 
stantial amount  of  new  theatre  construction 
very  soon  in  the  United  States,  the  possibil- 
ity of  one  or  two  here  and  there  as  tech- 
nological progress,  or  as  the  growth  of  new 
communities  suggest,  is  always  with  us. 

In  other  regions  of  the  world  new  mo- 
tion picture  theatres  continue  to  be  erected 
in  appreciable  numbers.  Here  in  America, 
and  to  some  extent  in  Canada,  construction 
of  drive-ins  has  met  part  of  the  demand  of 
growth  and  shift  in  population.  Elsewhere, 
as  a rule,  distribution  of  the  automobile  is 
too  restricted  for  successful  drive-in  opera- 
tion. There  the  regular,  enclosed  theatre 
(which  is  the  concern  of  this  article)  ap- 
parently will  long  be  practically  the  only 
channel  of  public  motion  picture  exhibition. 
While  home  television  is  likely  to  grow 
in  all  but  the  more  remote  parts  of  the 
world,  it  is  still  a very  minor  medium  of 
communication  in  many  countries,  includ- 
ing some  where  post-war  reconstruction 
and  industrial  development  are  supplying 
impetus  to  more  and  better  motion  picture 
exhibition. 

EXHIBITION  NEEDS 

Throughout  the  course  of  technical  ex- 
ploration thus  far,  we  have  thought  of  ap- 
plication in  terms  preponderantly,  if  not 
exclusively,  of  existing  theatres.  These 
terms,  obviously,  must  continue  to  figure 
importantly  in  the  current  effort  to  improve 
the  art.  It  is,  however,  only  in  completely 
new  designing,  which  is  almost  certain  to 


mean  new  construction  from  the  foundation 
up,  that  we  can  give  “wide-screen”  tech- 
nique the  conditions  most  favorable  to  its 
commercial  e.xploitation. 

For  the  art  of  the  screen  as  now  under 
development  to  realize  its  objectives,  the 
theatre  designed  and  equipped  for  it  should 
have : 

1.  A projection  print  for  an  aperture  of 
2 square  inches,  or  more. 

2.  Screen  brightness  (with  the  shutter 
running  but  no  film)  of  20  foot-lamberts, 
or  more.  (Yet  additional  light  could  well 
be  provided  to  allow  for  deeper  saturation 
of  color  pictures.) 

3.  A projected  image  which  occupies 
about  40°  of  the  field  of  audience  vision  as 
measured  from  the  most  remote  seating 
location  (see  Item  5). 

4.  All  auditorium  surfaces  entering  ef- 
fectively into  normal  audience  vision  of  the 
screen  passive  in  form,  with  light  intensity 
and  coloration  sympathetic  to  these  quali- 
ties of  the  picture. 

5.  Width  of  seating  area  at  last  row 
not  to  exceed  one  and  a half  times  the 
width  of  the  picture,  with  the  width 
dimishing  to  slightly  less  than  picture  width 
at  the  first  row. 

6.  Bottom  edge  of  picture  at  least  3 
feet  below  the  eye  level  of  persons  seated  in 
the  first  row,  with  floor  slope  allowing 
vision  generally  to  approximately  this  point. 

7.  An  aspect  ratio  of  the  projected  pic- 
ture related  to  the  actual  vertical  range  of 
audience  vision. 

8.  Provisions  for  seating  placing  average 


eye  level  for  as  much  of  the  audience  as 
possible  at  or  near  the  level  of  the  middle 
of  the  picture. 

9.  Films  that  represent  recognition  in 
cinematographic  technique  of  the  function 
of  viewing  angles  in  exhibition. 

10.  Stereophonic  sound  reproduction, 
with  acoustical  treatment  prescribed  speci- 
fically for  realistic  reproduction  of  outdoor 
sounds  (reverberation  characteristics  of  in- 
door sounds  to  be  supplied  as  qualities  of 
the  recording). 

PICTURE  DOMINATION 

These  specifications  provide  for  condi- 
tions that  allow  an  audience  to  experience 
an  “at-the-scene”  feeling.  All  of  the  spec- 
tators are  placed  close  enough  to  the  picture 
to  make  the  performance  area  dominate  the 
field  of  vision.  Giving  the  audience  this 
relationship  to  the  picture  of  course  restricts 
seating  capacity.  The  key  to  capacity  is  not 
the  size  of  the  plot  under  a “pack-’em-in” 
philosophy  of  exhibition.  The  number  of 
seats  is  determined  by  the  size  of  the  pro- 
jected image. 

Until  recently  it  was  impossible  to  make 
these  determinations  because  film  specifica- 
tions, and  possibilities  in  projection  equip- 
ment, screens,  optics,  etc.,  were  too  in- 
definite. While  methods  are  still  varied 
and  inconclusive,  implementation  and  re- 
search have  been  carried  far  enough  to  form 
a substantial  basis  of  auditorium  design. 

Among  the  ten  specifications  given  above 
are  several  referring  to  cinematography  and 


10 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


superiority  and  to  resolve  differences  of  method  accord- 
ing to  the  needs  of  the  art  and  its  most  effective  ex- 
ploitation. . . Meanwhile  there  remains  the  business  of 
exhibiting  motion  pictures,  which  means  presenting  them 
adequately  and  attracting  the  public  to  them.  Variously, 
theatres  have  had  to  be  adapted  to  principal  new  processes. 


Conversely,  technical  development  has  had  to  consider 
constrictive  conditions  presented  by  existing  theatres.  . . 
The  problems  thus  presented  both  exhibitor  and  tech- 
nologist during  the  past  three  years  are  here  considered 
in  three  articles,  two  of  which  begin  below.  They  suggest 
ways  to  better  adjust  to  technical  progress  in  days  ahead. 


A Way  to  Simplify 
the  New  Projection 

Examining  the  variety  of  projection  systems  complicating 
exhibition  and  suggesting  methods  that  could  reduce 
the  burden  without  interfering  with  technical  progress. 


film  prints.  Motion  picture  technique  can- 
not be  envisaged  without  its  theatre.  The 
two  were  never  put  together  as  inter-acting 
components  of  the  art,  and  this  funda- 
mental dissociation  has  been  no  help  to 
either.  By  the  time  principles  of  theatre 
design  began  to  evolve  directly  from  the 
peculiarities  of  the  motion  picture,  a huge, 
world-wide  exhibition  plant  had  been  built. 

Limitations  w'hich  it  has  always  imposed 
on  the  medium  are  now  being  compounded. 
The  need  for  technical  development  to 
increase  the  theatrical  screen’s  uniqueness 
and  to  e.xpand  its  capacity  to  entertain  is  far 
too  great,  how'ever,  for  the  extent  and 
character  of  this  growth  to  be  determined 
ultimately  by  ill  adapted  real  estate. 

THEATRE  FACTORS 

At  the  same  time,  development  of  a bet- 
ter technology’  had  better  be  studiously 
guided  by  conditions  w’hich  even  a building 
expressly  designed  for  it  must  present.  This 
theatre  is  an  architectural  enclosure  for  the 
assembly  of  people  in  sufficient  amount  to 
satisfy  certain  economic  requirements.  Let 
us  consider  an  auditorium  designed  for  the 
fullest  practicable  exploitation  of  wfide- 
screen  technique.  With  an  optimum  seat- 
ing capacity  of  700,  it  nevertheless  could 
present  a picture  65  feet  wide  (equipment 
now’  available  or  in  serious  development 
would  permit  the  projection  of  a high- 
quality  image  in  such  a width).  The  seats 
closest  to  the  screen  w’ould  be  highly  de- 
sirable view’ing  positions  provided  the  fol- 
lowing conditions  are  supplied : 

A.  The  picture  is  placed  as  low  as  pos- 
sible to  decrease  the  upward  angle  of  view. 

B.  Cinematography  recognizes  the  advan- 
tage of  having  main  action  relatively  low, 
with  the  uppermost  portion  of  the  picture 
typically  used  for  environmental  material 
{thus  realizing,  for  that  matter,  image  com- 
position usual  to  real  life). 

C.  Cinematography  uses  the  extreme 
sides  of  the  picture  largely  for  environ- 
mental material  and  incidental  action. 

D.  Proper  picture  size  for  desired  effect, 
and  the  distance  from  it  to  the  first  row  of 
seating  are  adjusted  to  prevent  film  grain 
from  being  detrimental  to  visual  comfort. 

{Continued  on  page  27) 


By  GIO  GAGLIARDI 


THE  ARRIVAL  of  a new’ 
year  seems  an  appro- 
priate occasion  to  ex- 
amine the  present  con- 
fused state  of  motion 
picture  projection  and 
to  think  of  w’ays  and 
means  of  bringing 
about  some  form  of 
order  and  a less  com- 
plicated procedure. 

During  the  past  three  years,  projection 
has  become  a thing  of  many  different  sys- 
tems, many  different  picture  sizes,  many 
different  picture  proportions.  The  sponsor 
of  a particular  system  naturally  prefers 
his  own  for  certain  reasons  and  he  is  re- 
luctant to  make  modifications  for  the  sake 
of  conformity. 

Once  a system  has  been  used  extensively 
in  the  field,  especially  where  substantial 
expenditures  have  been  made  by  exhibitors, 
any  changes  involving  new  equipment 
meet  resistance  and  become  difficult  to  ac- 
complish. These  attitudes  on  the  part  of 
producer  and  exhibitor  have  a tendency  to 
restrict  changes  which  may  lead  toward 
simplification  without  reducing  the  quality 
of  picture  and  sound  presentation. 

Television  has  established  a definite  type 
of  competition  for  the  motion  picture  the- 
atre. New  sources  of  film  product  are 


supplying  TV  with  more  pictures  of  a 
more  acceptable  quality.  Color  television 
sets  may  soon  be  lowered  in  cost  to  fit 
most  everyone’s  pocketbook.  Metered  pay 
television  may  come  eventually  and  have 
access  to  major  productions.  With  such 
possibilities  in  view,  the  motion  picture 
theatre  business  should  encourage  every 
source  of  improvement  in  its  own  medium 
of  entertainment. 

The  public  has  become  very  selective  in 
its  buying  of  entertainment.  The  industry 
therefore  should  be  united  in  exploring  and 
promoting  every  possible  means  for  im- 
proving picture  quality  and  presentation. 
An  exhibitor  wTo  allows  the  quality  of  a 
picture  to  suffer  in  presentation  not  only 
harms  himself  but  does  the  whole  industry’ 
a far-reaching  disservice. 

LOSS  OF  IMAGE  QUALITY 

In  the  last  two  years  almost  all  theatres 
have  increased  their  picture  sizes  and  have 
changed  aspect  ratios  as  well.  Former  pic- 
ture areas  have  been  trebled  and  quad- 
rupled. This  has  not  been  consistently  ac- 
companied, however,  by  a comparable  in- 
crease in  the  physical  quality  of  the  film 
photograph  in  relation  to  projection.  The 
net  result  has  been  actual  deterioration  of 
the  screen  image  in  most  instances  of  wide- 
screen presentation. 

One  of  the  major  factors  of  poor  screen 
image  quality  is  over-enlargement  of  the 
film  photograph.  In  the  days  before  the 

1 1 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


Projection 

System 

Anamorphic 

Ratio 

Aspect 

Ratio 

Aperture 

Size 

Film 

Area 

Picture 

Size 

Enlarge- 

ment 

1 

C'Scc^e 

Opt, 

2 to  1 

2.35  to 

1 

.839"x.715" 

.600 

sq.in. 

17'x40* 

680  sq.ft. 

163,000 

times 

2 

Crop, 

Stand, 

2 to  1 

,825"Xo4l2" 

.3^ 

sq.in. 

17‘x34» 

580  sq.ft. 

246,000 

times 

3 

Anamor, 

System 

1.7  to 

1 

2 to  1 

.839"x,715" 

.600 

sq.in. 

17'x34» 

580  sq.ft. 

139,000 

times 

4 

Crop, 

Stand, 

1.75  to 

1 

.825'»x.471" 

.389 

sq.in. 

17*x30* 

510  sq.ft. 

189,000 

times 

5 

Anamor, 

System 

lo5  to 

1 

1.75  to 

1 

,839''x.715" 

.600 

sq.in. 

17*x30» 

510  sq.ft. 

122,000 

times 

6 

C’ Scope 
Mag. 

2 to  1 

2.55  to 

1 

.912"x.715'’ 

.652 

sq.in. 

I6*x40* 

640  sq.ft. 

141,000 

times 

7 

Crop, 

Stand. 

2 to  1 

o825"x.412" 

.3^ 

sq.in. 

I6*x32* 

510  sq.ft. 

216,000 

times 

8 

Anamor • 
System 

1.5  to 

1 

1.92  to 

1 

o912"x.715" 

.652 

sq.in. 

I6‘x31* 

500  sq.ft. 

110,000 

times 

9 

Crop, 

Stand. 

2 to  1 

,825"x.4l2" 

.340 

sq.in. 

20*x40* 

800  sq.ft. 

340,000 

times 

10 

Anamor. 

System 

1.5  to 

3 

1.92  to 

1 

.912"x.715" 

.652 

sq.in. 

21*x40» 

840  sq.ft. 

185,000 

times 

TABLE  OF  MAGNIFICATION  RATES  FOR  VARIOUS  PROJECTION  SYSTEMS 


large  screen,  enlargements  of  80,000  to 
100,000  times  were  ver\-  seldom  exceeded. 
That  kept  resolution  well  within  the 
bounds  of  acceptability. 

Today  that  is  no  longer  the  case.  With 
the  new  large  pictures,  area  magnification 
of  over  500,000  times  has  been  attempted 
on  many  large  indoor  screens  and  the  re- 
sults have  been  extremely  poor.  Let  us 
review  the  various  means  by  which  this 
problem  has  been  or  should  be  attacked : 

//.  J'he  present  large  pictures  on  the 
screens  can  be  reduced  to  their  former  sizes. 
This  of  course  is  unthinkable.  The  public 
would  not  accept  such  a great  reduction  in 
picture  size  since  greater  size  and  progress 
have  become  synonymous.  It  is  true  that 
some  exhibitors  have  overdone  their  large 
blown-up  pictures ; these  should  be  recon- 
sidered in  the  light  of  present  experience 
and  future  possibilities. 

B.  Positive  film  larger  than  Standard 
35mm  can  be  used  in  theatres  to  reduce  the 
enlargement  ratio  between  the  film  frame 
and  the  picture  on  the  screen.  'I'his  pro- 
cedure is  very  commendable  and  may  be  an 
ultimate  future  step;  however,  this  would 
require  completely  new’  projection  equip- 
ment in  theatres  and  is  only  considered  now 


on  the  basis  of  “roadshows”  in  large  houses. 

C.  Improve  the  quality  of  the  picture 
information  on  the  present  35mm  film  to 
such  an  extent  that  it  will  bear  greater 
magnification  without  loss  of  quality  on  the 
screen.  This  type  of  improvement  has  now 
started  with  the  use  of  large  negative  pho- 
tographs and  optical  reduction  to  35mm 
positive  film  for  the  theatre.  Some  very 
good  results  have  been  obtained  in  recent 
demonstrations. 

D.  'I'he  possible  improvement  noted 
under  C can  also  be  incorporated  in  means 
for  better  utilization  of  the  existing  film 
area  in  present  35mm  positive  in  order  to 
produce  low’er  magnification  ratios  even  for 
large  pictures. 

DEFECTS  OF  CROPPING 

'I'he  items  discussed  under  B and  C are 
now  in  use  and  in  prospect  among  several 
large  producers.  Item  D — the  best  utiliza- 
tion of  present  existing  film — can  well  be 
a subject  for  intensive  investigations.  To- 
day there  is  a general  tendency  to  over- 
enlarge the  cropped  standard  frame  in 
order  to  make  it  comparable  to  Cinema- 
Scope  sizes.  This  procedure  has  several 


undesirable  effects,  which  are  as  follows: 

One,  the  blow-up  reduces  potential  pic- 
ture quality  because  of  poor  resolution  of 
the  film  photograph. 

Two,  short-focus,  high-speed  lenses 
must  often  be  used  to  enlarge  the  picture 
sufficiently,  and  these  lenses  have  extremely 
limited  depth  of  focus.  Since  more  light 
is  required  for  the  reduced  aperture  frame, 
the  proportional  over-heating  of  the  film 
causes  extensive  film  buckling,  therefore 
greater  in-and-out-of-focus  effect  on  the 
screen. 

Three,  the  impressive  effect  which  oc- 
curs when  a changeover  is  made  from  a 
smaller  picture  to  wide  CinemaScope  is 
lost  if  the  blown-up  picture,  news  or  short 
is  over-enlarged. 

Some  concept  of  our  present  problems 
and  of  a possible  method  for  their  solution 
may  be  obtained  by  examining  and  com- 
paring the  data  collected  in  the  accom- 
panying table.  The  assumption  for  this 
discussion  is  that  the  stage  will  permit  a 
picture  of  40  feet  maximum  width.  The 
problem  is  to  determine  what  picture  sizes 
can  be  installed  in  such  a theatre,  what  are 
the  best  magnification  conditions,  and  what 
changes  could  be  made  in  film  and  projec- 


12 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


MANUFACTURED  BY  INTERNATIONAL  PROJECTOR  CORPORATION  • DISTRIBUTED  BY  NATIONAL  THEATRE  SUPPLY 

SUBSIDIARIES  OF  GENERAL  PRECISION  EQUIPMENT  CORPORATION 


riNEST  MECHANISM  EVER  MADE ! 

'V 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


13 


Adding  Clamorscope 
to  Our  Techniques 

Submitting  methods  of  old-time  showmanship  as  interests 
again  claiming  an  important  share  of  the  industry's  energy. 


tion  procedure  to  give  better  conditions 
and  to  simplify  actual  operation. 

It  is  fairly  obvious  that  the  maximum 
projected  him  area,  using  our  present 
35mm  him,  is  obtained  with  full-sized 
CinemaScope,  which  has  an  aperture  .912" 
wide  by  .7 1 5"  high,  representing  an  area 
of  .652  square  inches.  This  case  is  shown 
as  hern  6 in  the  table.  This  film,  with 
an  anamorphic  compression  ratio  of  2-to-l, 
gives  a picture  16  feet  high  by  40  feet 
wide  at  an  enlargement  which  is  141,000 
times. 

Let  us  assume  that  this  theatre  is  not 
equipped  with  magnetic  reproducers  and 
insists  on  running  with  optical  track 
CinemaScope  prints,  then  the  data  in 
Item  1 will  apply.  Since  this  aperture  is 
only  .839"  X .715",  a proper  lens  should 
be  chosen  to  give  a picture  40  feet  wide, 
but  the  height  will  then  be  17  feet.  For 
this  case  the  enlargement  will  be  163,000 
times.  This  condition  is  not  as  good  as 
that  where  the  full  CinemaScope  frame 
is  used. 

LIMITING  MAGNIFICATION 

Now  let  us  see  what  happens  to  the 
blow-up  pictures  which  should  match  the 
two  cases  shown  above.  Items  2 and  7 
show  what  happens  to  standard  film  when 
a cropped  aperture  is  used.  For  a picture 
aspect  ratio  of  2-to-l  the  picture  in  Item  2 
would  be  1 7 feet  high  by  34  feet  wide. 
The  height  would  match  Item  1,  but  the 
picture  enlargement  would  be  246,000  as 
compared  to  163,000  for  CinemaScope  of 
Item  1 . 

The  case  of  Item  7 shows  a similar  re- 
lationship to  the  full-sized  CinemaScope 
aperture  and  picture  of  Item  6.  In  both 
instances,  even  when  the  cropped  standard 
picture  is  not  made  excessively  large,  the 
blown-up  type  of  picture  suffers  consider- 
ably from  over-magnification. 

Now  consider  the  case  where  an  ex- 
hibitor insists  upon  showing  a standard 
cropped  picture  so  that  it  will  fill  the 
screen.  Item  9 shows  this  condition.  The 
picture  is  made  40  feet  wide  to  compare 
with  CinemaScope,  so  that  with  a 2-to-l 
aspect  ratio,  the  enlargement  becomes 
340,000  times.  As  a result,  the  picture 
has  very  poor  definition  and  is  seldom  com- 
pletely in  focus. 

Obviously  a study  of  the  table  will  show 
that  the  principal  remedy  which  will  bring 
back  good  screen  image  quality  is  the  use 
of  the  largest  possible  film  area  in  the  pro- 
jector gate  that  our  present  35mm  stock 
will  permit.  When  we  crop  the  film  frame 
and  then  blow  it  up  excessively,  we  go 
completely  against  this  extremely  sensible 
principle. 

There  are  many  persons  in  the  industry 
who  maintain  that  a picture  aspect  ratio 
of  2-to-l  is  more  desirable  than  the  Cin- 
{ Continued  on  page  27) 


By  CURTIS  MEES 


WHERE  IS  THE  motion 
picture  producer  who 
fvW'  has  not  said,  “Now  if 

" i *****  I were  an  exhibitor 

JL  • • •”  gone  on  to 

offer  his  solutions  for 
the  ills,  weaknesses 
and  sins  of  exhibition? 
Theatre  management 
should  be  similarly  privileged  to  give  its 
opinion  of  production  as  it  affects  theatre 
attendance.  Not  qualified  to  discuss  pro- 
duction? Well,  what  the  hell  makes  so 
many  production  people  feel  they  are  quali- 
fied to  be  experts  on  exhibition? 

For  three  years  now  the  industry  has 
been  tinkering  with  the  machinery  in  a 
frenzied  effort  to  give  the  screen  perform- 
ance a “new  look.”  The  effort  has  been 
crowned  with  a very  measurable  amount  of 
success.  Not  only  should  it  be  continued, 
but  there  ought  to  be  an  institute  of  re- 
search or  a similar  agency  to  assure  tech- 
nical progress  consistently,  without  costly, 
nerve-wracking  confusion.  Exhibition,  ac- 
cording to  my  observations,  is  all  for  tech- 
nical progress,  but  it  knows,  from  living 
with  the  public,  that  any  technical  “sys- 
tem” is  only  a way  of  getting  on  the  screen 
what  the  people  want  to  see. 

ENTERTAINMENT  VALUES 

A basic  consideration  is  that  this  is  an 
industry — an  “art-industry,”  if  you  please, 
but  by  and  large  a business  as  distinguished 
from  a market  for  the  so-called  fine  arts. 
Economics  supersede  “art”  as  a vital  factor. 

Story  material  and  how  it  should  be 
handled  isn’t  a matter  for  the  intelligentsia 
to  decide.  When  exhibitors  attend  screen- 
ings of  pictures  these  days  they  too  often 
come  away  with  the  impression  that  the 


long-hair  comment  on  pictures  is  carrying 
too  much  weight  m Hollywood.  That  com- 
munity is  interested  in  grosses,  too.  But 
when  the  production  which  wins  the  long- 
hair raves  lays  an  egg  on  Main  Street, 
comes  this  alibi:  “It  is  a prestige  picture!” 
To  which  theatre  owners  and  managers 
are  inclined  to  respond  with  a loud  razz- 
berry. 

This  is  not  to  say  that  there  should  not 
be  anything  “artistic”  about  the  movies; 
however,  there  is  more  than  enough  ground 
on  which  to  build  up  artistic  value  that  is 
appreciated  by  a large  segment  of  the  gen- 
eral public  without  going  to  extremes  that 
alienate  the  mass  public.  The  general  pub- 
lic isn’t  altogether  infantile.  A lot  of 
people  can  appreciate  a picture  that  is  well 
made.  But  they  don’t  go  to  the  movies  for 
art’s  sake.  They  go  for  the  entertainment 
that  is  in  the  story,  the  characters,  the 
music,  etc.  Give  ’em  that  and  they’ll  take 
the  “art”  in  stride. 

DEVELOPING  STAR  NAMES 

Nor  do  they  go  to  the  movies  for  dra- 
matic dissertations  on  weighty  subjects.  If 
I were  a producer  I’d  pass  up  the  so-called 
“message”  pictures  and  leave  the  messages 
to  be  delivered  by  books  and  lectures,  or 
maybe  just  Western  Union. 

They  go  to  see  stars.  Whether  we  like 
it  or  not,  our  public  wants — nay,  demands 
— some  star  values  in  pictures.  To  ignore 
or  deny  that  at  this  stage  of  film  making 
is  to  throw  out  all  the  lessons  learned 
through  five  decades  of  motion  picture  ex- 
hibition. 

There  can  be,  however,  a judicious  bal- 
ancing of  performers,  with  at  least  one  or 
two  “big  names”  heading  up  a cast  that 
includes  promising  newcomers.  At  the 
moment  exhibition  Is  in  a concerted  move 
through  Compo  to  support  such  new  play- 
ers who  are  potential  Stars  of  Tomorrow. 
It  is  to  be  hoped  that  this  program  will 


14 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


gg!rn««’' 


Ui"'P^ 

TOitoo 


proieci‘0" 


d's  L«rg<’S 

send  »«'  ’ 


y,o\ec»iotv 


\i\e«aW*® 


SKVK — - 
I sTRttt- 

I cm  «■  ■ 


OtlLY^evPlf  LAMPS 


nal 


ARC  CRftl*» 


A variation  in  the  negative  carbon  burning  rate  of  as 
little  as  6 %to  8%  can  in  20  minutes  change  the  posi- 
tion of  the  positive  crater  in  relation  to  the  lamphouse 
optical  system  as  much  as  !4''.  Less  than  1 /32”  is  the 
maximum  error  that  can  be  tolerated  without  a loss  of 
illumination  and  change  in  color  of  the  light  on  the 
screen  to  either  blue  or  brown. 

The  Strong  Automatic  Crater  Positioning  System 
controls  the  burning  of  both  carbons,  maintaining  a 
steady  light  of  constant  color  temperature— exactly 
the  same  for  both  lamps— so  that  changeovers  need 
never  be  noticed. 

The  new,  more  complicated  projection  techniques 
have  greatly  added  to  the  demands  on  theprojectionist. 
He  now  has  even  less  time  for  careful  attention  to 
the  arc. 

The  Automatic  Arc  Crater  Positioning  System, 
which  eliminates  the  need  of  hand  feeding  and  cor- 
rection of  the  carbon  crater  position,  better  enables 
him  to  render  a good  presentation. 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


15 


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. V % 

Give  your  patrons  fast  relief  from 
worn,  uncomfortable  seats  and  watch 
your  attendance  go  up,  up,  UP!  We 
are  specialists  in  theatre  seating.  We’ll 
make  recommendations  within  your 
budget  . . . give  a low,  low,  estimate, 
do  the  work  while  your  show  proceeds. 

Just  shoot  through  your  inquiry  . . . 
leave  the  rest  to  us! 


seruite  co. 


WRITE.  WIRE  or 
PHONE  ALPINE 
5-8459 


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LuJ 

1674  SUMMIT  LAKE  BLVD..  AKRON,  O. 

Orlglnaton  of  All-Plaitle  & Seamle««  Pla»tie  S«re»ai 


bring  about  recognition  and  encouragement 
of  youngsters  for  whom  theatre  patrons 
vote.  It  would  be  unfair  to  these  young- 
sters, however,  to  expect  them  to  carry  a 
feature  picture  merely  because  they  have 
won  such  notice  from  the  public.  Rather 
than  building  them  up,  that  could  have 
the  very  unfortunate  effect  of  killing  them 
off  prematurely. 

GLAMORIZING  PLAYERS 

To  be  a motion  picture  star  is  to  enjoy 
certain  very  special  advantages  of  fame  and 
fortune,  and  you  pay  a price  for  them. 
You  lose  privacy.  What  you  do  or  say  is 
grist  for  the  mills  of  public  communica- 
tion. Many  people  wouldn’t  like  to  lose 
their  privilege  of  privacy.  \ ou  make  your 
choice. 

Publicity — the  good  kind — is  of  course 
proteins  and  vitamins  for  this  business  of 
ours.  \Vhere  has  gone  the  star  idolatry  of 
yesteryear?  Exhibition  misses  it.  It  traded 
on  it  for  several  generations.  The  glamor 
of  it  all ! Some  of  the  gloss  given  the 
movie  stars  brushed  off  on  the  little  theatre 
in  Tanktown.  Leading  players  were  huilt 
up  as  real-life  personalities.  In  various  pro- 
portions, it  w'as  malarkey,  but  the  public 
doesn’t  mind  a bit  of  romancing  for  sake 
of  its  cherished  illusions.  Could  be  the 
public  misses  the  old  glamor  of  the  movie 
w'orld  just  as  much  as  theatre  exhibitors 
find  they  do. 

Another  price  which  the  principal  play- 
ers should  expect  to  pay  for  their  eminence 
is  personal  appearances.  These  can  go  far 
to  restore  the  lively  personal  interest  of 
the  public  in  the  medium  as  well  as  its 
theatre. 

Personal  appearances  are  tiring,  nat- 
urally. Fatigue  is  known  in  the  work-a- 
day  world,  too.  The  fruits  of  personal  ap- 
pearances would  seem  to  be  worth  the  brief 
strain  on  the  nervous  system,  in  build-up 
both  for  the  current  attraction  and  for  the 
star  name  itself.  Newspapers  and  radio  and 
television  stations  usually  go  all-out  on 
local  visits  of  a screen  star.  And  that  has 
yet  another  happy  effect : it  helps  to  win 
around  those  organs  of  publicity  to  the  point 
of  view  of  theatre  management. 

SHOWMANSHIP  TIMING 

One  of  the  most  familiar  complaints 
among  theatre  owners  and  managers  is  that 
publicity  for  a feature  picture  gets  under 
way  when  no  press  material  and  accessories 
are  available  concurrent  with  release  of 
the  picture.  It  is  difficult  to  understand 
that  a production  should  be  released  prior 
to  proper  makeup  of  press  books,  advertis- 
ing accessories  and  national  tieups.  A mere 
exhibitor  might  think  that  the  producer 
himself  would  be  interested  in  such  prepa- 
ration. 

Into  the  preparation  of  this  material 


should  also  go  some  fresh  thinking.  Attrac- 
tion advertising  has  become  so  stereotyped 
that  while  it  may  conspicuously  identify 
the  studio,  the  copy  should  apply  to  a 
hundred  pictures. 

Perhaps  one  way  to  get  rid  of  this  mo- 
notony is  to  employ  outside  consultants. 
Their  ideas  might  not  be  superior  as  to 
art  and  form,  but  their  point  of  view  might 
be  different  from  those  who  have  been  con- 
sidering film  merchandising  for  a long  time 
from  within  the  business.  They  would  not 
approach  the  sales  values  of  the  produc- 
tion hidebound  by  company  “policy.”  The 
individual  production,  rather  than  the  pro- 
ducer or  studio,  would  probably  be  re- 
garded as  the  thing  to  sell,  and  that  point 
of  view  would  most  certainly  represent 
progress. 

Another  aspect  of  attraction  advertising 
which  needs  reconsideration  is  the  number 
of  credits  which  must  appear  in  newspaper 
copy.  Theatre  people  know  about  those 
contractual  stipulations  of  names  to  go  into 
billing,  in  what  order  and  what  relative 
size  of  type,  but  they  naturally  measure 
the  need  of  this  in  the  light  of  newspaper 
space  rates.  A mere  exhibitor  is  therefore 
likely  to  think  that  if  a name  doesn’t  sell 
tickets,  it  shouldn’t  be  in  the  ad.  Give  all 
those  solely  “legalistic”  credits  on  litho- 
graph paper,  but  don’t  clutter  up  the 
theatre’s  space  in  newspapers,  where  every 
line  must  count. 

PUBLIC  RELATIONS 

These  are  some  of  the  areas  of  the  busi- 
ness which  deserve  renewed  and  energetic 
attention  after  three  years  of  preoccupation 
with  “new  techniques.”  Better  technical 
methods  should  be  pursued,  but  it  is  time, 
we  submit,  to  put  them  in  their  place  as 
manufacturing  machinery,  not  the  merchan- 
dise itself. 

And  in  addition  to  the  merchandising 
of  each  production  for  what  it  is  in  story 
and  cast,  there  is  an  industry-wide  task  of 
public  relations  that  cries  for  more  thought 
and  energy  than  it  has  ever  before  received. 
It  is  logical  to  consider  Compo  as  the 
agency  to  direct  such  a program.  In  it 
the  industry  has  at  last  a ready-made  in- 
strument for  the  purpose.  Some  faltering 
steps  have  already  been  taken  along  these 
lines.  The  recent  action  of  Leonard  Gold- 
enson,  president  of  AB-Paramount  Thea- 
tres, in  suggesting  that  Compo  develop  an 
appeal  for  the  patronage  of  women,  was  a 
more  substantial  move  in  this  very'  impor- 
tant direction. 

Such  thinking  about  public  relations, 
emphasis  on  picture  content  with  realistic 
appraisal  of  popular  interests,  development 
and  exploitation  of  screen  personalities  in 
the  old-time  fan-producing  manner — these 
now  reclaim  their  due  share  of  the  energy' 
of  the  business.  In  1956  let’s  give  the 
theatre  Glamorscope! 


16 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  7.  1956 


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BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


17 


about  Products . . 

news  and  views  nf  the  market  and  its  sonrces  of  snpply 


Sales  Promotion  Kit 
For  Car-Hop  System 

TO  ASSIST  operators  who 
have  installed  its  “Servus-Fone”  electronic 
refreshment  ordering  system  for  car-hop 
service  at  drive-in  restaurants  and  theatres 
to  promote  the  device  to  the  public,  Motio- 
graph,  Inc.,  Chicago,  has  developed  a spe- 
cial sales  kit  containing  a large  number  of 
advertising  ideas  and  schemes. 

Use  of  the  suggestions  in  the  kit  will  not 
only  “permit  the  operator  to  make  his 
Servus-Fone  installation  an  immediate 


money-maker  but  should  result  in  his  re- 
covering his  investment  in  an  extremely 
short  time,”  according  to  Fred  C. 
Matthews,  of  Motiograph. 

The  kit  is  packed  with  suggestions  which 
have  been  tested  and  found  effective,  he 
said.  Included  are  a complete  television 
script  on  which  slides  have  been  made 
available ; a prepared  release  for  news- 
papers ; publicity  photos ; a decal  for  the 
restaurant  entrance  doors ; five  ad  mats. 

Also  a cooperative  “flowers  for  the 
ladies”  promotion ; prepared  classified  ad 
copy;  street  stunts;  auto  bumper  stickers; 
instructions  for  searchlight  use  on  opening 
night;  an  essay  contest  promotion;  an  auto 
license  number  promotion ; a disc  jockey 
program ; novelty  printed  promotions,  in- 
cluding “brilliant  rules  for  bridge,”  funny 
football  rules  and  a knitting  ruler. 

Also  a postcard  campaign  to  switch- 
board operators ; a mail  promotion  to  secre- 
taries and  stenographers;  a 1956  style 


“meal  ticket”  stunt;  novelty  pass-out  cards; 
a napkin  promotion  for  selling  “take-out” 
business ; roadside  tack  cards  promotion ; 
die-cut  cards  for  distribution  to  cars 
parked  on  streets. 

Also  street  spanner  suggestions ; bill- 
board copy;  football  schedules;  a “mystery 
tune”  stunt ; the  use  of  local  vocalists  on 
the  Servus-Fone  system;  civic  project 
promotion ; free  photos  of  customers  and 
a large  variety  of  other  ideas. 

Automatic  Coin  Changer 
With  19  Plastic  Keys 

AN  AUTOMATIC  Coin 
changer  equipped  with  a “simplified”  key- 
board has  been  added  to  its  line  of  such 
units  by  Metal  Products  Engineering 
Company,  Inc.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif.  The 
manufacturer  states  that  although  the  new 
model  has  only  19  keys  it  will  deliver  any 
change  combination  automatically — even 
split  change — by  pressing  just  two  keys. 

The  keys  are  of  plastic  and  it  is  pointed 
out  that  they  are  “logically  arranged  for 
accuracy  and  speed.”  "Fhere  are  ten  white 
keys  for  making  change  from  one  through 
ten  cents ; eight  aqua  keys  for  making 
change  from  20  through  90  cents;  and  a 
red  25-cent  key.  Each  key  is  marked  with 
a permanent  metal  foil  tab  which  has  large 
and  legible  numbers. 

Called  the  “Coin-Master,”  the  unit  is 


made  of  aluminum  with  a gray  hammer- 
tone  finish,  d'he  all-steel  parts  are  rust- 
proof. Four  rubber  feet  are  designed  to 
protect  counter  surfaces  from  being  marred 
or  scratched.  The  unit  will  fit  under  a 


standard  12-inch  counter  (it  is  WYz  inches 
high,  12  wide  and  9 deep)  and  holds  up 
to  $100  in  change  (280  pennies,  132 
nickels,  310  dimes,  80  quarters  and  60 
half-dollars). 

The  changer  is  available  with  roll-out 
or  tilt  cup  hand  delivery.  These  may  be 
placed  on  the  right  or  left  side  of  the  ma- 
chine so  that  the  cashier  can  use  the  unit 
on  either  side  of  the  counter. 

The  coin  magazine  can  readily  be  re- 
moved or  replaced,  it  is  stated,  and  can  be 
loaded  or  unloaded  quickly  and  easily,  in 
or  out  of  the  machine.  When  the  last  coin 
in  a column  is  ejected,  the  unit  locks  auto- 
matically in  order  that  “short  change” 
situations  may  be  avoided. 

Curtains  to  Protect 
Screens  at  Drive-Ins 

CURTAINS  to  protect  drive- 
in  screens  from  rain  and  dust-laden  wind, 
made  of  plastic  material  fabricated  ac- 
cording to  specifications  of  Vallen,  Inc., 
Akron,  Ohio,  and  designed  for  use  with 
that  company’s  track  and  control  equip- 
ment, as  modified  for  the  purpose,  are  to 
be  installed  in  four  outdoor  operations  of 
the  Cine  Colombia  circuit  of  Medellin, 
Colombia,  South  America. 

It  is  stated  that  the  curtains  will  oper- 
ate like  the  screen  traveler  of  an  enclosed 
theatre,  opening  to  any  distance  under  con- 
trol from  the  projection  room.  The  cur- 
tains are  available  in  several  colors. 

The  track  used  in  the  Colombian  instal- 
lations is  a modification  of  the  Vallen 
Super-No.  11.  All  of  the  equipment  was 
supplied  through  Vanderbrugh  3:  Com- 
pany, New  York. 

Vallen  recently  equipped  20  indoor  thea- 
tres of  the  Colombian  circuit  with  track 
and  curtain  control  equipment. 

Railings  Made  of 
Anodized  Aluminum 

PREFABRICATED  railings  of 
anodized  aluminum  designed  for  both  in- 
terior and  exterior  installations  have  been 
added  to  its  line  of  such  equipment  by 
Lawrence  Metal  Products,  Inc.,  Lynbrook, 


18 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


TT 


THE  THEATRE  SUPPLY 


MARr^ 


Index  to  Products  Advertised 
Described  in  this  Issue,  with 

• Dealer  Directory 

• Convenient  inquiry  postcard 


Finas  ar«  Moibered  for  easy  identificafion  in  nsina  postcard.  Dealer  indications  refer  to  listing  on  fellewing  page. 


ADVERTISERS 

NOTE:  See  small  type  under  advertiser's 
name  for  proper  reference  number  where 
mere  than  one  kind  of  product  is  advertised. 


Reference  Adv. 

Number 

I — Adler  SilhoueHo  Lefter  Co 28 


Changaable  letter  signs:  Front-lighted  paneli  for 
drive-ins  (lA),  back-lighted  panels  (IB),  and 
changeable  letters  (1C).  All  dealers. 

2 — American  Seating  Co 

Auditorium  chairs.  NTS. 


Reference  Adv. 

Number  Page 

20 —  Radio  Corp.  of  America 23,  31 

In-car  heaters  (20A),  drive-in  admissions  control 
system  (20B).  Dealers  marked*. 

21 —  RCA  Service  Co 29 

Sound  and  projection  equipment  maintenance  service. 

22 —  S.  O.  S.  Cinema  Supply  Corp 24 

Projection  lenses.  Direct. 

1 

23 —  Sonken-Galamba  Corp.  .' 32 

In-car  speaker  stands  and  guide  light  posts.  Direct. 


Reference  Adv. 

Number  Page 

31 —  Wenzel  Projector  Co 29 

Lens  light  shield.  Unafflilated  dealers. 

32 —  Westrex  Corp 25 

Foreign  distributors. 

33 —  Williams  Screen  Co 16 

Projection  screens.  Direct. 


EDITORIALLY  . . . 


3 —  Ballantyne  Co.,  The 

Drive-In  equipment  and  planning  package.  Dealers 
3.  20,  22,  24,  35,  37,  42.  47,  68.  76,  87.  92.  100. 
105,  106,  116. 

4 —  Bausch  & Lomb  Optical  Co 

Projection  lenses.  Direct  branches  and  affiliated 
dealers  in  all  major  eitles. 

5 —  Blue  Seal  Sound  Devices 

Projectors  (5A).  projector  bases  (5B),  soundheads 
(50,  magazines  (5D),  stereophonic  attachments  ' 
(5E),  amplifiers  (5F),  speakers  (5G).  Direct. 


6—  Bodde  Screen  Co 22 

Projection  screens.  Direct. 

7 —  Carbons,  Inc 27 

Projection  carbons.  Franchise  dealers. 

8—  Eprad  2nd  Cover 

In-ear  speakers.  Unaffiliated  dealers. 

9 —  F & Y Building  Service,  The 29 

Architectural  design  and  building  service. 

10 — Heyer-Shulti,  Inc 21 


Metal  projection  arc  reflectors.  Al  dealers. 


24 —  Spencer-Turbine  Co 23 

Vacuum  cleaners.  Unaffiliated  dealers. 

25 —  Star  Cinema  Supply  Corp 24 

Distributors. 

26 —  Strong  Electric  Corp 15 

Projection  lamps.  Unaffiliated  dealers. 

27 —  Theatre  Seat  Service  Co 16 

Theatre  chair  rehabilitation  service.  Direct. 

28 —  Vallen,  Inc 22 

Curtain  controls  and  tracks.  Direct. 

29 —  Wagner  Sign  Service,  Inc 7 


Changeable  letter  signs:  Front-llghted  panels  for 
drive-ins  (29A),  back-lighted  panels  (29B),  and 
changeable  letters  (29C).  Dealers  I,  2,  8,  II,  13. 
14.  15.  16,  18.  20,  21,  22,  23,  24,  25,  26,  27,  28, 

29,  30,  31,  32,  34,  35.  36,  38,  39,  40.  41,  42,  43. 

44.  47.  48.  50.  52,  53.  55.  56,  58  . 59,  61,  62.  63, 

65,  66,  67.  68,  70,  71.  74,  75.  77.  78.  80,  82.  84, 

85.  86.  87.  90,  91.  93.  94,  97,  99,  101,  102,  103, 
106,  107.  no.  Ill,  113,  115,  116,  118,  122,  123, 
124,  125. 


30 — Wallter-American  Corp 28 

Projection  screens.  NTS. 


AUTOMATIC  COIN  CHANGER,  page  18. 

New  automatic  coin  changer  with  19  plastic  keys. 
Made  by  Metal  Products  Engineering  Co.,  Inc. 
Postcard  reference  number  32E. 

DRIVE-IN  SCREEN  CURTAINS,  page  18. 

Curtains  to  protect  drive-in  screens  from  rain 
and  dust-laden  wind.  Announced  by  Vallen,  Inc. 
Postcard  reference  number  27A. 

ALUMINUM  RAILINGS,  page  18. 

Prefabricated  railings  of  anodized  aluminum. 
For  both  exterior  and  interior  use.  Marketed  by 
Lawrence  Metal  Products,  Inc.  Postcard  reference 
number  33E. 

SINGLE-CHANNEL  MAGNETIC,  page  22. 

Single-channel  magnetic  sound  system  marketed 
by  Magnasync  Mfg.  Co.  Postcard  reference  34E. 

SHUTTER  8ALANCER,  page  23. 

New  torsion  counter  balancer  to  close  projection 
room  fire  door  shutters.  From  Best  Devices  Co., 
Inc.  Postcard  reference  number  35E. 

PROJECTION  SCREEN,  page  24. 

New  type  of  screen  for  wide-screen  projection. 
Announced  by  Radiant  Mfg.  Corp.  Postcard  ref- 
erence number  36E. 


1 1 —  Heywood-Wakefield  Co 5 

Auditorium  chairs.  Dealers  8,  10,  14,  26.  32,  41, 

55.  58,  94,  97  and  branches. 

12 —  Ideal  Seating  Co 8 

Auditorium  chairs.  Unaffiliated  dealers. 

13 —  International  Projector  Corp 13 

Complete  projection  and  sound  systems.  NTS. 

14 —  Karagheusian,  Inc,,  A.  & M 3 

Wool  carpeting.  Direct. 

15 —  Kollmorgen  Optical  Corp 25 

Projection  lenses.  NTS  and  all  dealers. 

16 —  LaVezzi  Machine  Works 21 

Projector  parts.  All  dealers. 

17 —  Mitchell  Industries,  Hubert 24 

stage  rigging  and  hardware  (I7A),  curtain  tontrols 

and  tracks  (I7B).  Direct. 

18 —  National  Theatre  Supply 17,  32 

Distributors. 

19 —  Projection  Optics  Co 32 


Projection  lenses.  Distributor:  Raytone  Screen  Corp. 


For  further  information  concerning  products  referred  to 
on  this  page,  write  corresponding  numbers  and  your  name 
and  address,  in  spaces  provided  on  the  postcard  attach^ 
below,  and  mail.  Card  requires  no  addressing  or  postage. 


TO  BETTER  THEATRES  Service  Department: 

Please  have  literature,  prices,  etc.,  sent  to  me  according  to  the  following 
reference  numbers  in  January  1956  issue — 


NAME 

THEATRE  or  CIRCUIT 

STREET  ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 


i 


Theatre  Supply  Dealers 

Dealers  in  the  United  States  listed  alphabetically  by  states,  numbered  or  other- 
wise marked  for  cross-reference  from  Index  of  Advertisers  on  preceding  page 


ALABAMA 

1 —  Qiwm  Fasturt  SarviM.  I9l2'/i  Morris  Ava.,  Blrnilnghaa. 

ARIZONA 

2 —  Saiittiwest  Theatra  Supply,  3750  E.  Van  Buren,  Phoanix. 

ARKANSAS 

3 —  Arkansas  Theatra  Supply.  1008  Main  St.,  LIttIa  Rock. 

4 —  Tbaatra  Supply  Co.,  1921  Grand  Ava.,  Fort  Smith. 

CALIFORNIA 

Fresno: 

5—  MIdstata  Theatra  Supply,  1908  Thomas. 

Los  Angeles: 

8— John  P.  Filbert,  2007  S.  Vennont  Ava.* 

National  Theatre  Supply,  1961  S.  Vermont  Ava. 

7 —  Pombrax  Thoa^  Supply,  1969  S.  Vermont  Ava. 

8 —  B.  F,  Shearer,  1964  S.  Vennont  Ava, 

San  Francisco: 

National  Theatre  Supply,  255  Golden  Gate  Ava. 

9 —  Praddoy  Theatre  Supplies,  187  Golden  Gate  Ava, 

10—  B.  F.  Shearer,  243  Golden  Gate  Ave. 

11—  United  Theatre  Supply,  M2  Golden  Gate  Ave. 

12 —  Western  Theatrical  Equipment,  337  Golden  Gate  Ave.* 

COLORADO 

Denver: 

National  Theatre  Supply,  21 1 1 Champa  St. 

13 —  Service  Theatra  Sapply,  2054  Broadway. 

14 —  Western  Service  A Supply.  2120  Broadway.* 

CONNECTICUT 
New  Haven 

National  Theatre  Supply,  122  Meadow  St. 

DISTRICT  OF  COLUMBIA  (Washington) 

15 —  Brlent  A Sons.  925  New  Jersey  Ave.,  N.W.* 

16 —  Ben  Lust  1001  New  Jersey  Ava.,  N.W. 

17 —  R A S Theatre  Supply,  920  New  Jersey  Ave.,  N.W. 

FLORIDA 

18—  Joe  Hornstein,  329  W.  Flagler  St.  Miami. 

19 —  Southeastern  Equipment,  625  W.  Bay  St,  Jacksonville.* 

20 —  United  Theatre  Supply,  206  Memorial  Highway.  Tampa. 

21 —  United  Theatre  Supply,  329  W.  Flagler  St.,  Miami.* 

GEORGIA 

Albany: 

22 —  Dixie  Theatre  Service  A Supply,  1010  N.  Slappey  Dr, 

Atlanta: 

23—  Capitol  City  Supply.  161  Walton  St.,  N.W. 

24 —  Dixie  Theatre  Service  A Supply,  93  Walton  Ave.,  N.E. 
National  Theatre  Supply,  187  Walton  St.  N.W. 

25—  Southeastern  Theatre  Equipment,  201-3  Luckle  St,  N.W, 

26—  WII-KIn  Theatre  Supply,  301  North  Ave.,  N.E. 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

27 —  Abbott  Theatre  Supply.  1311  S.  Wabash  Ave.* 

25— Gardner  Theatre  Service,  1314  S.  Wabash  Ave. 

25— Movie  Supply.  1318  S.  Wabash  Ave. 

National  Theatre  Supply.  1325  S.  Wabash  Ave. 

INDIANA 

Evansville: 

so — Evansville  Theatre  Supply,  2900  E.  Chandler  Ave. 

Indianapolis: 

31—  Ger*Bar.  Inc..  442  N.  IlMnoit  St. 

National  Theatre  Supply.  436  N.  Illinois  St. 

IOWA 

Des  Moines: 

32 —  Des  Moines  Theatre  Supply.  1121  High  St 
National  Theatre  Supply.  1102  High  St. 

KANSAS 

Wichita: 

33 —  Southwest  Theatre  Equipment  P.  0.  Box  2138. 


KENTUCKY 

Louisville: 

34 —  Falls  City  Theatra  Equipment  427  S.  Third  St 

35—  Hadden  Theatre  Supply,  209  S.  3rd  ^ 

LOUISIANA 
New  Orleans: 

36 —  Hodges  Theatre  Supply,  1309  Cleveland  Ave. 

37—  Johnson  Theatre  Service.  1409  Cleveland  Ave. 

38 —  Southeastern  Theatra  Equipment  214  8.  Liberty  St* 

Shreveport: 

39 —  Alon  Boyd  Theatre  Equipment.  P.  0.  Box  362. 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore: 

40—  J.  F.  Busman  Co.,  12  East  25th  St 
National  Theatre  Supply,  417  St  Paul  Place. 

MASSACHUSEITS 

Boston: 

41 —  Capitol  Theatre  Supply,  28  Piedmont  St* 

42 —  Independent  Theatre  Supply.  28  Winchester  St 

43 —  Major  Theatre  Equipment.  44  Winchester  St. 

44 —  Massachusetts  Theatre  Equipment  20  Piedmont  St, 
National  Theatre  Supply,  37  Winchester  St 

45—  Standard  Theatra  Supply  78  Broadway. 

46 —  Theatre  Service  A Supply,  30  Piedmont  St. 

MICHIGAN 

Detroit: 

47—  Amusement  Supply,  208  W.  Montealm  St 

48—  Ernie  Forbes  Theatre  Supply,  214  W.  Montealm  St* 

49—  McArthur  Thoaire  Equipment,  454  W.  Columbia  St. 
National  Theatre  Supply,  2312  Cass  Ave. 

Grand  Rapids: 

so — RIngold  Theatre  ' quipmant  106  Michigan  St.,  N.W, 

MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis: 

31 — Elliott  Theatre  Equipment,  1110  Nicollet  Ave. 

52 —  Frosch  Theatre  Supply,  1 1 1 1 Currie  Ave.* 

53 —  Minneapolis  Theatre  Supply,  75  Glenwood  Ave. 
National  Theatre  Supply.  56  Glenwood  Ave. 

54 —  Western  Theatre  Equipment,  45  Glenwood  Ava. 

MISSOURI 


Kansas  City: 

55 —  Missouri  iheatre  Supply,  115  W.  18th  St* 
National  Theatre  Supply,  223  W.  18th  St. 

56 —  Shreve  Theatre  Supply,  217  W.  18th  St 

57 —  Stebblns  Theatra  Equipment,  1604  Wyandotte  St. 

St.  Louis: 

58 —  McCarty  Theatra  Supply,  3330  Olive  St. 

National  Theatre  Supply,  3212  Olive  St 

59 —  St.  Louis  Theatre  Supply  Ce.,  3310  Olive  St.* 

MONTANA 

60 —  Montana  Theatre  Supply,  Missoula. 

NEBRASKA 

Omaha: 

61 —  The  Ballantyne  Co..  1712  Jackson  St. 

National  Theatre  Supply,  1610  Davenport  St 

62 —  Quality  Theatre  Supply.  1515  Davenport  St 

63—  Western  Theatre  Supply,  214  N.  16th  St* 


NEW  MEXICO 

64 — Eastern  New  Mexico  Theatre  Supply,  Box  1009, 

NEW  YORK 


Albany: 


Mioany  i noaira  auqpiy,  44o  N.  P« 

National  rlMlatre  ^pply*  9^  BroatfwiQf. 


Auburn: 

66 — Auburn  Theatre  Equipment  5 Court  St 


Buffalo: 

67 — Eastern  Theatre  Supply,  496  Pearl  St* 
National  Theatre  Supply,  500  Pearl  St 


Clovis. 


BUSINESS  REPLY  CARD 

No  Posfoge  Stamp  Necessary  If  Mailed  in  the  United  States 

Postage  will  be  paid  by — 

QUIGLEY  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 
ROCKEFELLER  CENTER 
1270  SIXTH  AVENUE 
NEW  YORK  20,  N.  Y. 


FIRST  CLASS 

(See.34.9,P.L&R.) 
PERMIT  NO.  8894 
NEW  YORK.  N.  Y. 


68 —  PeHilns  Theatre  Supply,  505  Pearl  St 

69—  United  Projector  A Film,  228  Franklin  St 

New  York  City: 

70—  Aminement  Supply.  341  W.  44th  St 

71—  Capitol  Motion  Pieturo  Supply,  630  Ninth  Avo.* 

72—  Crown  Motion  Picture  SuppHee.  354  W.  44th  St 

73 —  Joe  Hornstein.  341  W.  44th  St 
National  Theatre  Supply,  358  W.  44th  St 

Syracuse: 

74 —  Central  N.  Y.  Theatre  Supply,  810  N.  Sallna  8t 

NORTH  CAROLINA 
Charlotte: 

J?~^*f'®***  Theatre  Supply,  208  8.  Poplar  St 
Theatre  Supply.  2IS  W.  3rd  St. 

National  Theatre  Supply,  304  S.  Church  St 

78 — Southeastern  Theatra  Equipment  209  S.  Poplar  8t.* 

79^Un^d  Theatre  Supply.  219  8.  Church  8t 

80—  Theatre  Equipment  Co.,  220  S.  Poplar  St 

81—  Wil.KIn  Theatre  Supply,  229  S.  Church  St 

Greensboro: 

82—  StM^  Th^tre  Supply.  215  E.  Waehingtoa  St 

83—  Theatre  Suppliers,  304  S.  Davis  St 

OHIO 

Cincinnati: 

Supply.  1638  Central  Pnrkway.* 
National  Theatre  Supply,  1637  Central  Parkway. 

Cleveland: 

Theatre  Supply,  2|28  Payne  Ave. 

I^OhJo  Theatre  Equipment,  2108  Payne  Ave. 

86—  Oliver  Theatre  Supply,  1701  E.  23rd  St* 

Columbus: 

87—  American  Theatre  Equipment  165  N.  High  St. 

Dayton: 

Theatre  Supply,  III  Velkenand  St 
69 — Sheldon  Theatre  Supply.  827  Salem  Ave. 

Toledo: 

9^Amerlean  Theatre  Supply  Co..  439  Dorr  St 
91— Theatre  Equipment  Co.,  1208  Cherry  St 

OKLAHOMA 
Oklahoma  City: 

Co..  706  N.  Grand 

^^~Howell  ThMtrv  SuppIlM.  12  8 Walkar  Avtk 
jy.**'£a‘.TI»»«tg  Supply.  700  W.  Grand  Ave.^  ' 

94—  Oklahoma  Theatra  Supply,  629  W.  Grand  Ave.* 

OREGON 

Portland: 

Supply.  1935  N.W.  Kearney  St* 
9^Portland  Motion  Picture  Supply,  916  N.W.  19th  St 
N.W.  Keam»  St 

98— Inter-State  Theatre  Equipment,  IKS  N.W.  Kearney  St 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia: 

95—  Slumberg  Bros.,  1305-07  Vino  St* 

Theatre  Supply  Co..  1225  Vine  St 
100 — Superior  Theatre  Equipment  1315  Vine  St 
Pittsburgh: 

Thoptro  ^pply,  84  Van  Bramm  St. 

Supply,  402  Mlltenberger  St. 

National  Theatra  Supply,  |72i  Blvd.  of  Alllee. 

Wilkes-Barre: 

103—  Vincent  M.  Tate,  1620  Wyoming  Avo.,  Forty-Fort. 

RHODE  ISLAND 

104—  Rhode  Icland  Supply,  387  Weotmlnster  St,  Providence 

SOUTH  DAKOTA 

105—  American  Theatre  Supply,  316  8.  Main  St.  Sioux  Falls. 

TENNESSEE 

Memphis: 

lO^Monaijh  Theatre  Supply,  492  a Second  St.* 

National  Theatre  Supply,  412  S.  Seoend  St 
187— Tii-State  Theatre  Supply,  820  a Saeend  St 

TEXAS 

Dallas: 

P***”  Supply,  ri4  South  Hampton  Rd. 

!?l — {••'■her  Broe..  406  8.  Harwood  St 

The^  Equipment  1916  Jackson  St. 

Notional  Theatre  Supply.  300  8.  Harwood  St 
i~5?“^*****™  Theatre  Equipment  2010  Jaekten  St* 

M2 — Sterling  sidee  A Servleo,  2019  Jackson  St 

Houston: 

IIS — Southwostom  Thoetre  Equipment  1022  Austin  8t* 

San  Antonio: 

114— Alamo  Theatre  Supply,  1806  Alametee  St 

UTAH 

Salt  Lake  City: 

Theatre  Supply.  264  East  First  South  St 
Theatre  Supply.  258  East  First  South  St 

117—  Wostorn  Sound  A Equipment  264  East  First  South  »*  * 

VIRGINIA 

118—  Norfolk  Theatre  Supply,  2700  Callw  Ava.  Narfbik 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle: 

Theatre  Supply.  2306  First  Avo. 

?i  Theatre  Equipment  Co.,  2224  Second  Ave 

Supply-  2400  Third  Ave.* 

Theatre  Supply.  2319  Second  St 

122—  B.  F.  Shearer,  2319  Second  Ave, 

WEST  VIRGINIA 

123—  Charleston  Theatre  Supply.  508  Lea  8t.,  Charieston 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee: 

iZ^Muhardt  Oa.  mo  W.  Olytowa  ot* 


N.  Y.  The  manufacturer  states  that  the 
new  units  are  particularly  adaptable  to 
those  locations  “where  heavy  traffic  ordi- 


narily causes  a great  deal  of  wear  and  tear 
on  old-fashioned  railings  now  in  use.” 

Of  extruded  aluminum,  the  railings  are 
said  to  be  both  weather-proof  and  rust- 
proof. It  is  further  asserted  that  they  re- 
quire no  more  than  a slightly  damp  cloth 
“to  keep  them  looking  fresh  and  clean.” 
The  satin-finished  anodize  of  the  units 
was  designed  to  match  stainless  steel  and 
aluminum  doors  and  store  fronts. 

Snow  Clearing  Machine 
with  New  Raker  Bar 

A NEW  MODEL  snow  clear- 
ing machine,  to  which  has  been  added  a 
special  raker  bar  designed  to  cut  up 
quickly  heavily  packed  or  deeply  piled  snow 
has  been  announced  by  Jari  Products,  Inc., 
Minneapolis.  The  machine  is  trade-named 
the  “Champion  Snow  Thrower.” 

The  raker  bar  consists  of  six  flat  steel 
teeth  mounted  on  the  machine’s  whirling 


fan.  The  bar  is  so  arranged  that  each  tooth 
travels  in  a separate  plane,  cutting  the 
packed  snow  into  small  pieces  that  can  be 
easily  thrown  to  one  side  by  the  fan. 

The  new  rotary  type  machine  is  self- 
propelled  and  powered  by  a 4-cycle,  2j^- 
h.p.  gas  engine,  designed  to  clear  a path 
20  inches  wide  through  any  depth  or  type 
of  snow  at  the  rate  of  520  shovelfuls  per 
minute,  the  manufacturer  states.  Thrown 
snow  is  spread  over  a 30-foot  strip  to  pre- 


The  new  wide  screen  presentations  de- 
mand rock  steady  projection  which  for 
years  exhibitors  have  been  expecting 
and  getting  by  using  LaVezzi  sprockets. 
In  addition,  the  clean  burr-free  teeth  are 
easier  on  the  film — an  important  factor 


with  the  narrow  perforations  of  the  four 
stripe  magnetic  film.  LaVezzi  sprockets 
are  properly  engineered  to  resist  wear — 
and  are  hardened  for  that  extra  margin 
of  usable  life.  For  better  projection  and 
peace  of  mind  get  LaVezzi  and  be  sure! 


Conversion  kits  for  most  models  of  Projectors  and 
Sound  Reproducers  — See  your  Theatre  Equipment 
Dealer  or  write  direct  for  illustrated  brochure 


LaVezzi  Machine  Works 

4635  WEST  LAKE  ST>  - C H I C AG  O 4 4,  I L L. 


Manufactured  by  HEYER-SHULTZ.  INC..  Cedar  Grove.  N I 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


21 


since  1916^  Vallen 

has  pioneered  the  design 
and  development  of  cur- 
tain controls  and  tracks 
to  fill  the  changing  needs 
of  the  modem  stage.  Thus, 
today  as  in  the  past,  you 
can  install  Vallen  equip- 
ment with  confidence  be- 
cause you  are  wisely 
investing  in  the  world’s 
finest. 


CAST  IN  ONf  SINGLE  PIECE 

NO  WELDS* NO  LINES 
NO  STREAKS* NO  CLOUDS 
AND  TRVLY  WASHABLE 


SEAMLESS 

SCREENS 


S«e  your  local 
supply  center  or 
contact  us  direct 

BODDE  SCREEN 

C*ni»aay 

11541  BRADLEY  AVE.J 


THE  ECONOMICAL,  BUT  THE 
FINEST,  FOR  WIDE-SCREEN, 
VISTAVISION  A CINEMASCOPE 

Screen  Samples  and 
Literature  on  Request 

SAN  FERNANDO,  CALIF. 


# Superior  Model  "A"  35mm  Pro- 
jectors 

e Superior  Deluxe  Bases 
e Superior  Magazines  2000  ft.  or 
5000  ft.  cap. 

# Blue  Seal  35mm  Optical  Sound 
Heads 

e Blue  Seal  4 track  Stereophonic 
e Attachments 

e Complete  line  of  Amplifiers 

# High  Fidelity  Speaker  Systems 

BLUE  SEAL  SOUND  DEVICES 

P.  O.  BOX  1008,  NEW  CANAAN.  CONN. 


vent  big  banks,  and  the  throwing  angle  is 
adjustable. 

Open  construction  is  designed  to  pre- 
vent clogging  or  stalling,  it  is  pointed  out, 
and  all  working  parts  are  protected  by  a 
wrap-around  hood.  A handlebar  is  adjust- 
able to  any  height  or  position  for  the  oper- 
ator’s convenience.  Additional  features  in- 
clude an  independent  clutch  for  easy  start- 
ing, two  forward  speeds  for  smooth  opera- 
tion, a spark  plug  cover  to  guard  against 
short  circuits  and  16-inch  solid  rubber 
wheels  to  grip  surfaces  firmly. 

Other  attachments  are  made  by  the  com- 
pany for  the  machine  so  it  may  be  used 
for  all-year  maintenance. 

Magnasync  Single-Channel 
Magnetic  Sound  System 

A SINGLE-CHANNEL  mag- 
netic sound  system,  called  the  “Magnaphonic 
C-1,”  has  been  marketed  by  the  Magnasync 
Manufacturing  Company,  North  Holly- 
wood, Calif.  The  system  is  delivered  com- 
plete with  two  penthouse  reproducers,  one 
wall  cabinet  including  self-powered  pre- 
amplifier, fader,  projector  changeover,  op- 
tical-magnetic selector  switch  and  all 
cables  for  interconnecting  reproducers  and 
wall  cabinet. 

Included  in  the  system  are  special  equal- 
izer arrangements  designed  to  adjust  the 
frequency  response  to  obtain  the  best  pos- 
sible reproduction  in  those  theatres  where 
the  equalization  of  the  power  amplifier  has 
been  designed  or  modified  for  the  peculiari- 
ties of  optical  reproduction.  By  the  addi- 
tion of  these  equalizers,  the  manufacturer 
declares,  minimum  changes  of  the  optical 
system  will  be  required  when  this  equip- 
ment is  installed.  All  such  equalization 
change  points  are  readily  accessible. 

I'he  component  parts  of  the  package  are 
shown  in  the  accompanying  photograph. 
Remote  linkage  assemblies  for  the  fader  and 
projector  changeover  are  optional  items 
which  may  be  ordered  separately. 


"Trade-In''  Offer  for 
Airtemp  Equipment 

OLD  MODELS  of  air-condi- 
tioners  now  installed  in  theatres  can  be 
“traded-in”  for  new  equipment  in  a special 
arrangement  announced  by  the  Airtemp 
Division  of  the  Chrysler  Corporation,  Day- 
ton,  Ohio.  The  offer  is  said  to  be  the  first 
of  its  type  for  that  industry  by  Sydney 
Anderson,  Jr.,  commercial  and  industrial 
air-conditioning  sales  manager  for  Airtemp. 

Pointing  out  that  many  air  conditioners 
being  used  today  are  from  15  to  20  years 
old,  Mr.  Anderson  stated  that  “because  of 
their  age  these  units  have  had  no  actual 
book-value  for  the  past  few  years.  But  to- 
day as  they  can  be  used  as  trade-ins  they 
again  represent  dollar  assets.” 

“Most  of  the  older  equipment  has  served 
the  user  well,”  he  added,  “nevertheless,  over 
the  years  the  equipment  has  probably  lost  a 
certain  per  cent  of  its  efficiency  as  a result 
of  normal  compressor  wear,  the  accumula- 
tion of  various  impurities  in  the  condensers 
and  cooling  coils  and  other  factors.  Also, 
though  the  equipment  may  apparently  still 
be  performing  satisfactorily,  unquestionably 
it  is  not  producing  the  same  amount  of 
cooling  as  it  did  during  its  early  years  of 
operation.  The  direct  result  is  higher  cost 
of  operation.  After  many  years  of  service 
there  is  also  a strong  likelihood  that  mainte- 
nance and  repair  costs  have  been  mounting.” 

He  then  cited  a partial  list  of  improve- 
ments that  have  been  made  in  air-condi- 
tioning equipment  in  recent  years.  It  in- 
cluded new  types  of  grills  to  improve  air 
distribution  and  eliminate  drafts;  new  ma- 
terials and  engineering  concepts  which 
made  modern  equipment  especially  quiet; 
more  efficient  cooling  coils ; improved  con- 
densers; bonderized  cabinets;  direct-driven 
sealed  compressors  cooled  by  refrigerant 
gas ; improved  design  and  appearance ; and 
waterless  equipment. 

In  promoting  its  trade-in  program,  the 
company  has  prepared  engineering  survey 


C 120  . fader  remote  (OftlONAll 


C 121  changeover  REmOU  jOFtiONAU 


Component  parts  of  the  Magnasync  single-channel  magnetic  sound  system. 


22 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


forms  which,  when  completed  by  competent 
personnel,  are  designed  to  show  business- 
men the  condition  of  their  present  equip- 
ment, including  its  capacity,  and  the  ad- 
vantages to  be  had  in  purchasing  new  ones. 


New  Balancer  for 


Theatre  Equipment  Soles,  Dept.  A-76,  Bldg.  15-1 
Radio  Corporotion  of  America,  Camden,  N.J. 

Please  rush  me  RCA  Control  System  details 

NAMF 

ADDRESS . 


Projection  Shutters 


CITY. 


.STATE. 


A NEW  TORISON  Counter 
balancer  designed  to  close  projection  room 
fire  door  shutters  “quietly  and  without 
jaring”  has  been  placed  on  the  market  by 
the  Best  Devices  Company,  Inc.,  Cleve- 
land. Units  are  available  to  fit  the  makes 
and  sizes  of  all  types  of  shutters,  it  is  stated. 

The  balancer  consists  of  a shaft  that  ro- 
tates on  bearings  formed  by  two  end  mount- 


ing brackets,  a torison  spring  and  an  arbor 
that  winds  or  unwinds  a cable  that  fastens 
to  the  shutter  door. 

By  mounting  the  shaft  parallel  on  the 
top  of  any  fire  shutter  frame,  the  cable 
readily  winds  or  unwinds  on  the  arbor  as 
the  door  is  raised  or  lowered,  the  manu- 
facturer explains.  As  the  door  lowers,  the 
cable  unwinds  turning  the  arbor  as  well  as 
the  shaft  against  the  resistance  of  a torison 
spring.  In  this  fashion,  it  is  asserted,  the 
door  is  made  to  close  quietly  and  without 
jar  and  shock. 

The  balancer  is  said  to  be  easy  to  install, 
maintain  and  adjust  to  the  right  tension 
for  smooth  shutter  closing. 

AMPEX  EXPANDS  SERVICE 

The  Ampex  Corporation,  Redwood 
City,  now  has  underway  a program  to  es- 
tablish a nationwide  network  of  authorized 
service  representatives  for  its  audio  equip- 
ment under  the  direction  of  Harold  Van 
Childs,  manager  of  its  Customer  Service 


Watch  those  receipts! 

TALLER  & COOPER  ADMISSION  CONTROL  SYSTEM 


Places  you,  the  owner,  in  control  of  the  box  office. 

Puts  you  in  a position  to  realize  full  take. 

Signals  number  of  occupants  in  incoming  cars  to  patrons  and  management. 
Automatically  records  amount  of  each  paid  transaction. 
Double-checks,  records  number  of  incoming  cars  via  4-contact  treadle. 
No  tickets— eliminates  expense  of  buying  and  handling  tickets. 

Keeps  accurate,  simplified  records  for  tax-figuring. 

Usually  pays  for  itself  by  increasing  earnings. 

Urgent . . . send  coupon  for  complete  details  in  a hurry! 


Theatre  Equipment  Sales 

RADIO  CORPORATION  of  AMERICA 

Camden,  N.J. 


THE  SPENCER  TURBINE  COMPANY  • HARTFORD.^,  CONNECTICUT 


Spencer  manufacturers  a complete  line  of  Commercial  Portable  Vacuum  Cleaners 


COMMERCIAL 
P125— 1 H.P. 


MULTI-VAC 
SENIOR  P115 
3/4  H.P. 


MULTI-VAC 
JUNIOR  Pill 
V2  H.P. 


Engineered  . . . built  for  hard  service  ...  by  vacuum 
specialists  with  experience  second  to  none.  Priced 
less  than  $250,  made-to-order  for  limited  budgets 
. . . especially  so  because  you  make  no  compromise 
with  quality  or  efficiency. 

Full  Ys  h.p.  motor.  Gets  all  the  dirt  ...  up  to  6 
times  more.  For  wet  or  dry  pick-up  . . . and  for  every 
cleaning  task.  Unique  advantages  of  internal  dirt  bag 
emptying  and  dust-free  dry  mop  cleaning  accessory. 

V/rite  Dept.  BT  . . . see  how  much  MORE  cleaning 
power  you  get  per  dollar  with  this  new  Spencer. 


MORE  POWER 

BETTER  CLEANING 

for  less  than  $250®® 


SPENCER  PUS 


1SP56C 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


23 


A New  Low  Price! 


Cinematic  IV 

Adjustable  Prismatic  Anamorphlc 
Lenses  with  Permanent  mounting 
brackets  for  all  projectors. 

(%/v  ^375 


BEST  VALUES  In  Metallic  Seamless  Screens, 
Aperture  Plates  and  Everything  for  Cinema- 
Scope 


S.O.S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY  Corp. 

Dept.  A.  602  W.  52  St.,  N.  Y.  19— Cab/e:  Sosound 


SPECIAL  PURCHASE! 


Another  shipment  of  Simplex  rear  shutter 
double  bearings  has  arrived  from  large 
circuit.  High  numbers,  latest  features.  Good 
condition,  for  regular  or  standby  use.  A 
steal  at  only  $99.75  each. 

*STAR  CINEMA  SUPPLY  CO. 

(21  W.  SSth  Street,  New  York  19,  N.  Y. 


IMPORTANT  NEWS/ 

SHOWMEN  — Before  Buying  your 
Stage  Equipment  why  not  ask  your 
supply  dealer  to  show  our  complete 
line  or  send  for  FREE  Literature  and 
price  list  now. 


Save  time  and  money  by  doing  business  with 
A merica’  largest  manufacturer. 


HARTZELLE,  ALABAMA 


Engineering  Department.  Service  organi- 
zations will  adjust  and  repair  Ampex  sound 
equipment  at  no  charge  during  the  war- 
ranty period  established  for  the  various 
Ampex  units  and  at  competitive  rates  after 
the  warranty  has  expired.  New  service 
agencies  will  augment  service  facilities  now 
provided  by  Ampex  dealers  maintaining 
service  departments.  Named  to  date  are 
Electronic  Engineers,  Inc.,  Chicago;  Manu- 
facturer’s Electronic  Service,  Hollywood, 
Calif. ; and  the  Robert  Dollar  Company, 
San  Francisco. 

Carpet  Lining  with 
"Anti-Friction''  Top 

A SPONGE  rubber  carpet 
lining  with  a fiber  topping  designed  to  give 
it  an  “anti-friction”  surface  has  been  de- 
veloped by  Hewitt-Robins,  Inc.,  Stamford, 
Conn.  Called  “Tex-Top,”  the  new 
“economy-priced”  product  complements  the 
company’s  first-line  carpet  underlay  called 
“Kik-Kwik.” 

It  is  explained  by  the  manufacturer  that 
while  both  of  its  linings  have  “anti-fric- 
tion” treatment,  they  are  acquired  in  differ- 
ent ways.  That  of  “Kik-Kwik”  is  achieved 
by  a new  method  of  rubber  compounding, 
it  is  stated,  while  the  new  lining  uses  fiber 
topping. 

The  new  product  is  made  in  gauges  of 
3/16  and  Inches;  widths  of  36  and  53 
inches;  and  lengths  of  20  yards. 

Radiant  Announces 
New  Projection  Screen 

A NEW  SCREEN  especially 
designed  for  “all  types  of  wide-screen  pro- 
jection” has  been  announced  by  the  Ra- 
diant Manufacturing  Corporation,  Chi- 
cago. It  has  been  trade-named  the  “Peri- 
pheral Vision  Superama  Screen.” 

The  screen  was  thoroughly  field-tested 
through  installations  in  theatres  in  all 
parts  of  the  country  for  a period  of  three 
months,  according  to  A.  Wertheimer,  ex- 
ecutive vice-president  of  Radiant.  It  is 
now  available,  he  added  “at  the  same  price 
as  is  in  effect  on  our  previous  models.” 


Ampex  Single-Track 
Magnetic  Sound  Unit 

A SINGLE-TRACK  magnetic 
sound  system,  complete  with  two  repro- 
ducers, for  reproduction  from  CinemaScope 
prints  in  theatres  having  only  one  amplifi- 
cation-speaker channel  (as  for  optical 
sound)  has  been  announced  by  the  Ampex 
Corporation,  Redwood  City,  Calif.  The 
cabinet  provides  a preamplifier  for  mag- 
netic sound  chageover  for  two  projectors, 
optical-magnetic  selector  switch,  gain  con- 
trol for  magnetic  operation,  and  self-con- 
tained power  supply,  forming  a unit  de- 
signed to  be  mounted  on  a projection  room 
wall. 

Cut-outs  on  the  top  and  bottom  of  the 
cabinet  permit  convenient  conduit  runs,  and 
terminal  boards  for  connection  to  external 
cabling  are  located  convenient  to  the  cut- 
outs. Louvers  on  the  top  and  bottom  panels 
of  the  cabinet  are  designed  to  provide  for 
cooling. 

Gain  and  changeover  controls  have  been 
combined  into  a single  operating  knob,  lo- 
cated on  the  right-hand  side  panel  of  the 
cabinet.  An  auxiliary  changeover  control 
and  indicator  is  also  located  on  the  front 
panel.  The  optical-magnetic  switchover 
control  is  located  on  the  right-hand  side 
panel  of  the  cabinet.  Both  the  gain- 
changeover  and  optical  magnetic  switch- 
over control  shafts  may  be  extended  along 
the  projection  room  wall  to  the  second  pro- 
jector station  for  operation  at  either  posi- 
tion, through  the  use  of  optical  extension 
rods. 

Gain  indication  is  provided  on  a dial, 
visible  from  the  front  of  the  cabinet.  All 
power  functions,  including  the  on-off 
switch.  Indicating  pilot  lamp  and  fusing, 
are  located  on  a panel  mounted  on  the 
rear  wall  of  the  cabinet,  accessible  through 
the  front  panel. 

The  front  co\’er  may  be  removed  for 
access  to  the  interior  of  the  cabinet.  Equal- 
ization connections  are  arranged  on  a ter- 
minal board  mounted  directly  on  the 
amplifier.  The  preamplifier  design  is  based 
upon  one  used  by  Ampex  in  numerous  mag- 
netic recording  applications,  the  company 
announcement  states. 


omponent  parts  of  the  Ampex  single-track  magnetic  sound  system. 


24 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7.  1956 


PAROMEL  KITS  FOR  NAVY 

Paromel  Electronics  Corporation,  Chi- 
cago, manufacturer  of  35mm  projection 
equipment  formerly  produced  by  the  De 
\ ry  Corporation,  has  furnished  the  Navy 
Department  with  modernization  kits  for 
over  200  of  its  theatres  in  conjunction  with 
their  recent  con\ersion  to  CinemaScope 
(with  one  optical  sound  track).  The  kits 
were  supplied  through  the  Altec  Service 
Corporation.  In  this  field  modernization 
program  the  Navy’s  De  \ ry  Type  “C 
projectors  (used  during  the  war)  were  con- 
verted to  Paromel’s  latest  Type  “10”  units. 
• 

BODDE  SCREEN  IN  RENO 

A new'  Bodde  screen  has  been  installed 
in  the  Granada  theatre,  Reno,  Nev.,  which 
entailed  special  construction  of  the  theatre’s 
fire  exits  in  order  to  allow  for  the  maxi- 
mum screen  width  possible.  The  installa- 
tion was  made  by  Bob  Bemis  of  the  Walter 
G.  Preddey  Theatre  Supply  Company, 
Reno,  and  represented  the  100th  Bodde 
screen  he  has  placed.  The  screen  at  the 
Granada  is  50  feet  wide  by  26  feet  high. 

• 

NEW  LITERATURE 

Emergency  Lighting  Equipment : A new 
catalogue  describing  its  line  of  automatic 
emergency  lighting  units  for  use  when 
regular  power  fails  has  been  issued  by  the 
Electric  Cord  Company,  New  York. 
Trade-named  “Chargomatic,”  the  units 
contain  no  manually  operated  switches  or 
timers  for  fast  charging,  it  is  pointed  out, 
all  such  operations  being  automatic.  The 
eight-page  catalogue  contains  illustrations 
and  specifications  of  the  equipment  in  the 
line.  Copies  may  be  secured  by  writing  the 
company  ( 105  William  Street,  New  ^ ork 
38,  N.  Y.). 

.Manual  Door  Controls:  A new  folder 
describing  its  line  of  manual  door  controls 
has  been  issued  by  the  Dor-O-Matic  Divi- 
sion of  Republic  Industries,  Inc.,  Chicago. 
The  units  are  designed  to  be  concealed  in 
the  floor  to  control  both  the  opening  and 
the  closing  of  doors.  The  folder  gives  a 
complete  description  and  applications  of  the 
company’s  25  models.  Free  copies  may  be 
obtained  by  writing  the  manufacturer  (4446 
North  Knox  Avenue,  Chicago  30). 

Floor  Machines  and  Vacuum  Cleaners: 
A new  and  simplified  guide  to  selecting  the 
proper  size  and  type  of  machine  from  its 
line  of  floor  machines  and  vacuum  cleaners 
has  been  released  by  the  Kent  Company, 
Rome,  N.  Y.  Included  with  data  is  the 
complete  “K-line”  of  balanced-power  floor 
machines — six  basic  sizes  from  11  to  22- 
inch  diameter  brushes.  In  addition  four 
vacuum  machines  are  described  as  to  use 
and  type  of  operation.  Copies  of  the  folder 
may  be  obtained  by  writing  the  company 
(885  Canal  Street,  Rome,  N.  Y.). 


MOVIES 

ARE 

BETTER 

THAN 

EVER 

xYl.  I,. I 


(BOXOFFICt 


B.A. 


APPEAL) 


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• GREATER  LIGHT  • GREATER  CONTRAST  • GREATER  SHARPNESS 

Watch  your  “B.A."  climb  when  you  Install  Super  Snaplite 
Lenses.  Give  your  patrons  the  benefit  of  pictures  at  their 
best.  You  can't  beat  the  Super  Snaplite  f/1.7  when  it 
comes  to  putting  a clear,  sharp  picture  on  your  screen. 

Ask  your  Theatre  Supply  Dealer  about  these  fine  lenses. 
For  more  information  ask  your  dealer  or  write  for 
Bulletin  222. 

"You  Get  More  Light  with  Super  Snaplite" 


KOIiliA\OK.«G!B 


Plant;  347  King  Street 
Northampton,  Massachusetts 


NEW  YORK  OFFICE: 


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30  CHURCH  STREET,  NEW  YORK  7,  N.  Y. 


Or\e  way  ^'o  pos'fect"' be  a.  coupon  clippcY 


FOR  THEATRES  OUTSIDE  U.  S.  A.  AND  CANADA— 
FOR  STUDIOS  EVERYWHERE— 

No  Matter  What  You  Need .. .Westrex  Has  It! 

Westrex  maintains  a complete  supply  and  service  organization 
to  meet  the  needs  of  studios  throughout  the  world  and  of 
theatres  outside  the  United  States  and  Canada.  Look  to  Westrex. 


Westrex  Corporation 

ni  EIGHTH  AVENUE,  NEW  YORK  11,  N.  Y. 
HOLLYWOOD  DIVISION:  6601  ROAAAINE  STREET,  HOLLYWOOD  38,  CAL. 


Research,  Distribution  and  Service  for  the  Motion  Picture  Industry 


BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


25 


Lamps  with  Rotating  Clamp 
And  Photoelectric  Arc  Control 


By  M.  0.  FAIGE 

"Doc"  Faige  and  Associates,  New  York 

THERE  ARE  several  excellent 
lamps  available  for  the  larger  the- 
atres and  drive-ins.  The  three 
“Gonematic”  models  manufactured 
by  the  Murch  Electric  Company  of 
Franklin,  Me.,  and  distributed  by 
“Doc”  Faige  and  Associates,  New 
York,  through  dealers  throughout 
the  U.  S.  and  abroad,  are  among 
these.  In  external  appearance  the 
new  “Conematic”  lamp  looks  very 
much  like  most  other  H.  I.  reflector 
lamps  of  its  general  class.  The  un- 
coated positive  carbon  rotates  as  it 
feeds,  and  the  copper-coated  nega- 
tive is  inclined  at  an  angle  of  40 
degrees.  The  arc  is  readily  struck 
with  a twist  of  a large  knob  on  the 
operating  panel. 

There  are  distinguishing  features 
of  importance,  however.  One  is 
that  the  positive  carbon  is  firm  in 
its  holder  and  the  whole  clamp  is 
rotated  by  means  of  a chain  and 
sprocket  assembly  which  also  ro- 
tates the  positive  feed  screw 
pusher  mechanism. 

Distribution  of  light  on  the  screen 
has  long  been  a bone  of  contention 
in  projection  circles.  Side-to-center 
distribution  on  the  screen  with  the 
“Gonematic”  ranges  from  80  to  85 
per  cent  when  this  lamp  is  focused 
for  maximum  efficiency.  The  light 
output  is  in  the  order  of  20,000 
lumens  with  standard  optical  sound 
film  aperture  and  coated  / 1.9  lens 
of  5-inch  focal  length,  and  burning 
the  9mm  “black”  positive  carbon 
with  5 16-lnch  coated  negative  in 
the  75-80  ampere  range. 

The  reflectors  employed  in  “Gone- 
matic” lamps  are  16'/2  and  18  inches 
in  diameter,  working  at  geometric 
speeds  of  /,  1.9  and  //1.7,  respec- 
tively. The  working  distance  may 
be  varied  over  a range  of  about  2 
inches  without  appreciably  affect- 
ing the  quantity  or  quality  of  light. 

Another  outstanding  special  fea- 
ture of  “Gonematic”  lamps  is  a 
photoelectric  arc  control.  As  pro- 
jectionists well  know,  even  with  a 
bimetallic  thermostat  type  of  con- 
trol, the  arc  gap  may  change  in 


length,  and  the  positive  carbon  may 
wander  outside  tolerated  limits. 
Instead  of  a bimetallic  switch, 
which  is  activated  only  by  heat 
emanating  from  the  edge  of  the 
positive  crater,  and  which  neces- 
sarily permits  the  positive  carbon 
to  advance  or  recede  beyond  the 
optimum  position  whenever  a lip 
accidentally  forms,  the  “Gonematic” 
photoelectric  arc-feeding  and  crater- 
positioning mechanism  operates  by 
“looking”  at  the  center  of  the  lu- 
minous gas  ball  as  reflected  by  the 
mirror  that  handles  the  light  illum- 
inating the  picture. 

The  design  of  the  photoelectric 
arc  control  provides  for  a ray  of 
light  to  pass  from  the  center  of  the 
positive  crater  to  the  edge  of  the 
mirror,  and  thence  to  a small  cylin- 
drical reflector  made  of  stainless 


metal  and  having  a seml-dlffuse 
optical  surface.  The  Murch  optical 
cylinder,  used  in  all  “Gonematic” 
lamps,  is  supported  at  the  end  of  a 
short  length  of  tubing.  The  optical 
cylinder  intercepts  the  edge  of  the 
beam  thrown  forward  by  the  mirror 
and  reflects  the  light  to  a photocell 
at  the  side  of  the  lamphouse.  This 
photocell  is  of  the  standard  caesium 
type  used  for  sound  reproduction. 


Should  the  positive  crater  ad- 
vance toward  the  mirror,  the  beam 
of  light  reflected  by  the  mirror  be- 
comes slightly  wider  and  results  in 
stronger  illumination  of  the  photo- 
cell. This  causes  the  feed  motor  to 
slow  down  until  the  crater  burns 
back  to  the  point  of  correct  geo- 
metric focus.  Gonversely,  if  the 
crater  recedes  from  the  mirror,  the 
photocell  gets  less  light  because  the 
beam  has  been  slightly  diminished 
in  diameter.  Immediately  the  photo- 
cell speeds  up  the  motor  and  re- 
stores the  crater  to  its  proper  focal 
position. 

The  rate  of  positive  feed  in  rela- 
tion to  the  advance  of  the  negative 
carbon  is  adjustable,  as  is  also  the 
overall  speed  of  feeding.  A cor- 
rect rate  of  positive-carbon  rotation 
has  been  established  by  design. 


Electrical  contact  with  the  positive 
carbon  is  made  by  wide,  silver- 
faced  brushes. 

A separately  powered  blower  is 
built  into  the  “Gonematic”  to  main- 
tain a low  operating  temperature 
and  to  insure  complete  combustion 
and  removal  of  gas.  The  burner 
remains  cool  enough  to  permit  re- 
trimming with  the  bare  hands,  even 
immediately  after  a shut-dowm. 


Interior  view  of  Murch  "Conematic"  lamp  showing  rotating  clamp  and  contact  assembly,  and 
optical  cylinder  (above  positive  carbon)  of  arc  control  system,  which  adjusts  gap  in  response  to 
mirror  reflection. 


26 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


A \Nay  to  Simplify  the  New  Projection 

CONTINUED  FROM  PAGE  14  


emaScope  ratio  of  2.35  or  2.55-to-l.  This 
argument  may  have  some  justification; 
however,  the  loss  of  picture  quality  pro- 
duced by  cropping  a standard  aperture  to 
obtain  this  aspect  ratio  only  serves  to  de- 
feat the  process. 

A method  may  be  suggested  which  will 
use  the  maximum  amount  of  film  area  and 
also  confine  magnification  to  a minimum. 
Let  us  first  consider  Item  8 in  the  table. 
Here  we  use  the  maximum  picture  frame 
size  of  .912"  x .715";  however  the  picture 
on  the  film  is  compressed  to  an  anamorphic 
ratio  of  1.5-to-l,  and  when  projected 
through  a 1.5-to-l  anamorphic  expander  a 
picture  16  feet  by  31  feet  will  be  obtained. 
This  will  have  an  enlargement  ratio  of 
only  110,000  times.  Item  7 shows  a 
cropped  picture  of  the  same  size  which, 
however,  has  twice  such  enlargement 
(216,000  times). 

The  case  shown  in  Item  5 is  quite  simi- 
lar, but  the  picture  area  on  the  film  is 
reduced  to  .839"  x .715"  to  suit  single- 
track  optical  sound.  Even  for  the  largest 
picture  possible  under  the  conditions  of 
this  discussion.  Item  10  shows  that  a 21- 
foot  by  40-foot  picture  projected  with  a 
1.5-to-l  anamorphic  system  would  have  an 
enlargement  factor  of  185,000  times,  which 
is  far  less  than  the  340,000  times  produced 
by  the  cropped  picture  of  Item  9. 

If  all  pictures  were  photographed  ana- 
morphically  in  a proper  ratio  and  released 


with  the  four-track  magnetic  CinemaScope 
print  specifications  (aperture  size  .912"  x 
.715"),  both  CinemaScope  and  2-to-l  ratio 
pictures  could  be  projected  to  a width  of 
40  feet  with  acceptable  magnification.  This 
would  be  especially  true  with  print-down 
from  larger  negative  frame.  With  the 
latter  technique  plus  recent  improvements 
in  chemical  reagents,  the  above  proposals 
should  insure  extremely  good  picture  qual- 
ity even  in  the  upper  picture  sizes. 

If  it  were  possible  to  have  such  proce- 
dure universally  accepted,  projection  would 
be  simplified  considerably. 

The  height  of  the  pictures  would  be  the 
same  and  the  center  lines  of  the  pictures 
would  coincide. 

Full  size  apertures  could  be  used,  and 
the  projectors  would  not  have  to  be  moved 
between  pictures. 

The  same  back-up  lenses  could  be  used 
in  all  cases,  and  if  a variable  anamorphic 
attachment  were  used,  the  only  operational 
change  required  for  the  different  projection 
systems  would  be  to  reset  the  anamorphic 
ratio  of  the  expander. 

The  writer  submits  this  system  in  the 
interests  of  sorely  needed  simplification  of 
motion  picture  projection  among  the  ma- 
jority of  theatres  everywhere.  It  in  no  way 
places  any  burden  on  technical  progress. 
To  the  contrary,  it  would  enable  the  in- 
dustry to  realize  more  consistently  the  ad- 
vances already  achieved. 


Theatre  Design  in  the  New  Techniques 

CONTINUED  FROM  PAGE  1 1 


Some  tests  made  recently  for  a picture  60 
feet  wide  indicated  that  the  distance  from  it 
to  the  first  row  could  be  approximately  35 
feet  if  the  film  photograph  had  an  area  of  2 
square  inches,  and  about  45  feet  if  that  area 
were  1 Yi  square  inches. 

Seating  has  to  be  as  close  to  the  screen  as 
it  is  practicable  to  put  it  in  order  to 
minimize  loss  of  land  value  and  the  amount 
of  non-productive  structure.  It  fortunately 
so  happens  that  these  forward  viewing  posi- 
tions are  among  those  from  which  the 
screen  performance,  completely  filling  the 
field  of  vision,  gives  the  greatest  sense  of 
“presence.” 

In  designing  a theatre  for  the  new  tech- 
niques we  need  not  provide  for  deeply 
curved  screen  as  a means  of  attaining 
“presence,”  or  as  it  is  sometimes  confusingly 
called,  “participation.”  Subtended  viewing 
angles  alone  control  the  degree  to  which 
the  spectator  has  a feeling  of  being  at  the 
scene.  Any  screen  curvature  emplo3'ed  is 
useful  mostly,  if  not  entirely,  for  the  pur- 
pose of  distributing  screen  light  more  uni- 


formly and  of  equalizing  focus  across  the 
screen.  These  purposes  are  served  by  curv- 
ing the  screen  with  the  projection  throw,  or 
not  less  than  75%  of  it,  as  the  radius. 

In  this  contemplation  of  theatre  and 
motion  picture  technique  designed  one  for 
the  other  to  realize  the  ultimate  possibilities 
of  the  screen,  we  are  of  course  setting  forth 
conditions  not  to  be  met  generally.  There 
always  has  been  material  differentiation 
among  theatres,  with  groupings  according 
to  greater  or  lesser  facilities  of  one  kind 
and  another,  including  those  entering  into 
picture  presentation.  The  departure  from 
traditional  screen  technique  now  being  un- 
der taken  may  reasonably  call  for  further 
differentiation,  with  the  new  screen  format 
first  and  foremost  among  the  considerations 
dictating  design.  Experience  with  that 
group  would  advise  how  much  the  whole 
exhibition  plant  could  be  practicably  revised 
to  install,  or  approach,  the  same  superla- 
tive conditions. 

The  motion  picture  deserves  that  chance 
{Continued  on  page  29) 


Test  ’em  at 
Our  Expense! 

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There’s  a Lorraine  Carbon  for  your 
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27 


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QUALITY  AND 
OUTSTANDING  SERVICE! 


A Tour  of  the  Theatre 


reported  by 


. . . owner-manager  of  the  Norfhwood  theatre  in  Norfhwood,  la. 


A COUPLE  of  sears  ago, 
when  we  were  operating  in  another  town, 
we  told  you  of  a stunt  we  had  used  to 
make  closer  contact  with  the  youngsters. 
We  showed  some  of  the  school  kids  around 
the  theatre  and  had  them  write  an  “essay” 
on  what  they  saw.  Well,  we  dusted  it  off 
in  our  present  town  a couple  of  weeks  ago. 
1 don’t  know  what  it  will  mean  at  the  bo.x- 
oflRce,  but  it  gave  us  a lot  of  fun,  and  these 
days  in  small  town  exhibition  you  gotta 
get  a big  percentage  of  your  take  in  the 
fun  you  get  out  of  it. 

• 

\Ve  invited  the  fourth  grade  class  and 
had  it  for  nearly  two  hours  on  a Cook’s 
tour  topped  off  with  a cartoon  and  a 
comedy.  We  picked  the  fourth  grade  to 
take  the  tour  because  those  kids  were  old 
enough  to  be  interested  and  to  understand 
what  we  told  them,  yet  not  too  old  to 
know'  it  all  already  and  embarrass  us  with 
a lot  of  wdse-guy  technical  questions. 

The  idea  behind  this  tour  is  that  the 
kids  are  impressed  by  w'hat  you  say  and 
indebted  to  you  because  you  got  them  out 
of  two  hours  of  class  w'ork.  They  all 
learned  more  about  the  theatre  than  they 
dreamed  existed. 

We  seated  them  in  a group  and  started 
talking  to  them  about  how'  the  theatre 
w'as  different  than  any  other  store  on  Main 
Street,  how  its  front  was  different  and 
why,  how  its  inside  was  different,  its  floor 
sloped,  its  lighting  effects  for  beauty  in- 
stead of  for  just  illumination  like  stores. 
• 

We  first  showed  them  how  the  physical 
building  itself  was  a thing  apart  from  other 
business  places,  then  w'e  told  them  about 
seating  with  self-rising  seats  to  make  it 
easier  for  them  to  approach  their  chair  and 
nicer  for  the  janitor  and  how  the  mohair 
backs  made  them  more  comfortable,  w’ere 
prettier  and  better  lor  acoustics.  We  ex- 
plained about  the  acoustical  treatment  on 
the  walls,  drawing  the  pebble  in  the  water 
simile  for  them  so  they  w'ould  get  the  idea 
of  how'  sound  travels  and  bounces. 

We  explained  the  stage,  footlights,  spot- 
lights, switch  panels,  screen  and  traveler 
curtain,  and  they  were  interested  enough 
to  ask  questions  about  them.  Then  we  tore 


up  an  old  polio  trailer  into  one-foot  lengths 
and  let  them  all  have  a sample  of  film. 

We  explained  the  sound  track  to  them 
and  demonstrated  with  the  trusty  Zippo 
that  the  film  w’ould  not  burn.  We  even 
gave  them  a squirt  of  the  fire  extinguisher 
down  the  aisle  to  show  what  we’d  do  if  we 
had  a fire. 

We  went  around  to  other  parts  of  the 
theatre,  including  the  air-conditioning 
plant,  the  furnace  room,  back  stage,  mouse- 
proof  popcorn  bin,  candy  room  and  projec- 
tion room.  We  let  them  watch  a projector 
run  with  film  in  it  and  let  them  peek  inside 
the  lamphouse. 

After  the  tour  we  gave  them  a few 
minutes  talk  on  what  we  expected  of  them 
when  they  came  to  the  theatre,  how  they 
were  being  judged  by  everjone  in  the  thea- 
tre as  to  what  kind  of  boys  and  girls  they 
were,  what  kind  of  manners  they  had,  etc., 
etc.  We  explained  why  running  in  the 
aisles  was  dangerous  and  distracting.  1 
think  they  got  the  idea. 

We  finished  by  asking  them  to  go  back 
to  school  and  write  a short  essay  on  what 
they  had  done  and  learned  this  afternoon. 
I later  picked  up  the  essays  and  published 
a few  of  the  best  ones  in  my  ad  in  the  news- 
paper. They  were  all  looking  to  see  if 
“theirs”  would  be  one  of  the  essays  printed. 
1 called  them  “testimonials”  in  the  paper. 
That  was  one  ad  1 knew  was  read. 

Does  this  sound  like  fun  to  you?  WTll, 
maybe  not,  but  it  was  for  us  and  it  was 
for  our  kids.  It’s  fun  to  see  some  enthusi- 
asm generated  on  the  faces  and  in  the  coun- 
tenances of  a group  of  today’s  small-fry 
who  will  become  tomorrow’s  full-price 
patrons. 

It  does  something  for  your  ego  and  some- 
thing for  your  faith  to  learn  first  hand 
that  you  are  still  dealing  in  a very  saleable 
product,  one  that  still  has  more  glamor  and 
interest  than  any  store  on  Main  Street. 
Not  that  business  has  boomed  because  these 
kids  got  the  grand  tour,  but  it’s  like  insur- 
ing against  loss  of  interest  in  the  theatre. 
It’s  leaving  no  stone  unturned  in  doing 
everything  you  can,  and  can  afford,  to  keep 
the  doors  open. 

But  before  we  get  too  profound  let’s 
look  at  a few  of  the  “essays”  that  resulted 


28 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


from  that  afternoon’s  program,  just  as  they 
were  written : 

“We  went  to  the  theatre  and  went  back 
stage  and  saw  where  they  keep  their  pop- 
corn. Then  we  went  down  to  the  basement 
and  saw  where  the  big  fan  was.  We  went 
up  stairs  and  saw  big  bulb.  Then  we  saw 
movie  then  came  back’’ — Danny  Tuttle. 
Danny  will  probably  never  be  a very  great 
author. 

“Mr.  Jones  invited  the  class  to  visit  the 
theatre.  We  went  up  and  saw  the  camera. 
We  saw  a green  light  Mr.  Jones  opened 
the  side.  It  was  so  bright  that  j^ou  couldn’t 
look  at  it  too  long.  We  went  in  back  of 
the  screen  and  saw  the  speaker.  When  we 
came  out  somebody  asked  what  those  holes 
in  the  screen  were  for.  He  said  if  they 
weren’t  in  the  screen  we  couldn’t  hear 
very  good.  We  went  down  the  basement. 
Then  we  went  up  stairs.  He  gave  the  class 
some  old  films.  Then  he  showed  the  class 
that  film  would  not  burn.  If  there  was  a 
fire  it  wouldn’t  have  been  such  a bad  one. 
He  got  the  fire  extinguisher  and  made  it 
go  down  the  aisle.’’ — Robert  Reeder. 

I had  34  essays  to  look  over.  After  read- 
ing them  I agree  that  the  teachers  in 
Northwood  are  underpaid.  No  essay,  how- 
ever, came  up  to  the  literary  style  and 
brevity  of  the  one  from  the  buck-toothed 
kid  who  described  his  afternoon  in  the 
following  masterpiece : “Floor  shape  like 
saucer.  Seat  flop  up  and  down.” 

Even  the  teacher  said  she  learned  a lot 
about  the  theatre  that  day.  And  as  posi- 
tive proof  that  I got  through  to  some  of 
them,  my  projectionist,  who  has  been  here 
for  20  years,  said  he  even  learned  a few 
things  himself.  So  did  I. 

"V  ou  might  as  well  have  some  fun.  If 
you  make  money  you  just  worry  about  it. 


THEATRE  DESIGN 

{Continued  from  page  27) 

to  fulfill  its  potentialities.  It  is  not  to  be- 
little by  a jot  what  the  last  three  years  have 
produced  in  the  way  of  a better  screen  per- 
formance. The  improvement  has  been  great 
and  is  the  more  remarkable  for  the  in- 
geniousness  with  which  it  has  been  made 
widely  available.  But  the  machinery  of  it 
is  still,  from  the  broadest  point  of  view,  an 
attachment.  It  has  had  to  be.  It  is  yet 
in  development,  however,  and  from  this  re- 
search and  usage  must  eventually  come 
some  unity  of  experience  as  to  what  is  best 
for  the  purpose.  Theatre  design  free  of 
past  practice  should  now  begin  to  figure  in 
this  experience  in  order  to  bring  forth  a 
system  that  co-ordinates  and  integrates  all 
functions  from  camera  to  audience. 


Your  doorman 
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Your  usherettes 
may  be  starlets . . . 


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BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


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Afew  "Walk-In”  Theatre 
for  a Small  Drive-In 


AT  THE  Clervue  drive-in 
in  the  small  Florida  town  of  Clermont 
patrons  were  recently  introduced  to  a new 
type  of  “walk-in”  installation,  employing 
a small,  enclosed  “auditorium”  from 
which  they  could  view  the  screen.  This 
scheme  was  the  latest  showmanship  crea- 
tion of  Hugh  G.  Martin,  a veteran  of  43 
tears  in  motion  picture  exhibition  whose 
successful  ideas  in  exploitation  have  earned 
him  an  impressive  reputation  far  and  wide. 

Mr.  Martin  is  a partner  and  chief  officer 
of  MCM  Theatres,  a circuit  with  16  oper- 
ations both  indoor  and  drive-in  throughout 


Florida  with  headquarters  in  Leesburg. 
The  theatres  are  mostly  in  small  towns, 
or  as  Mr.  Martin  calls  them  “the  ‘one 
horse  town  variety,’  meaning  one  bank, 
one  doctor,  one  super  market,  one  news- 
paper (that  a weekly)  and  one  theatre.” 
The  “small”  size  of  the  town  hasn’t 
kept  Mr.  Martin  from  conceiving  and  exe- 
cuting a variety  of  “big”  promotional 
schemes,  which  the  new  “walk-in”  at  Cler- 
mont exemplifies.  He  owns  the  Clervue 
entirely  himself,  and  he  often  uses  this 
drive-in  as  a “guinea  pig”  for  testing  his 
ideas  before  putting  them  into  practice 


An  enclosed  auditorium  for 
"walk-in"  trade  is  the  latest  in- 
novation at  the  Clervue  drive- 
in,  Clermont,  Fla.,  as  conceived 
by  veteran  exhibitor  Hugh  G. 
Martin.  He  describes  the  scheme 
herewith  along  with  some  other 
of  his  recent  promotional  ideas. 

elsewhere.  An  extensive  renovating  pro- 
gram was  recently  begun  there,  in  which 
the  “walk-in”  was  the  first  step. 

The  Clervue  has  a capacity  of  253  cars, 
divided  among  seven  ramps,  and  the  audi- 
torium, which  seats  35,  has  been  placed  at 
the  eighth  ramp,  where  it  is  adjacent  to 
the  refreshment  stand. 

Mr.  Martin  describes  the  building  as 


Plate  glass  gives  patrons  of  the  "walk-in"  section 
of  the  Clervue  drive-in  an  unobstructed  view  of 
the  screen  from  the  last  ramp  (the  eighth)  where 
the  enclosed  "auditorium"  (loft)  is  situated.  Hugh 
G.  Martin,  owner  of  the  drive-in,  is  shown  look- 
ing into  the  building  (above)  which  seats  35. 


30 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  7.  1956 


follows:  “The  one  building  I now  have 
is  small ; in  fact  it  resembles  the  usual 
motel  room,  from  the  highw'ay.  There  are 
five  rows  of  cushioned  chairs,  with  seven 
to  each  row.  Aisles  are  at  the  side  walls. 
The  front  is  of  plate  glass  and  gives  a 
clear  view  of  the  screen.  The  room  is 
heated  electrically  with  thermostat  control, 
and  air-conditioning  will  be  added  next 
spring. 

“The  building  is  screened,  and  the 
entrance  door  is  a glass  jalousie  type  for 
ventilation.  The  auditorium  floor  is  ele- 
vated, and  smoking  stands  are  furnished 
^r>r  the  convenience  of  patrons.” 

A policy  of  charging  a slightly  higher 
admission  price  for  the  “walk-in”  section 
than  that  for  the  regular  drive-in  area  has 
been  adopted  by  Mr.  Martin.  Adults 
must  pay  5^*  more — or  — while  children 

are  charged  15^^  each  instead  of  being  ad- 
mitted free.  In  regard  to  this  latter  policy, 
Mr.  Martin  explains,  “I  do  not  care  to 
make  this  area  a playground.” 

Separate  tickets  for  the  extra  admission 
are  necessary,  he  points  out,  “as  the  door- 
man must  have  a ticket  to  tear  and  can, 
of  course,  check  numbers  for  those  who 
walk  out  to  rest  rooms  or  the  refreshment 
building.” 

Elaborating  further  on  the  advantages 
to  patrons  of  the  scheme  Mr.  Martin 
enumerates  them  as  follows:  “The  theatre 
is  enclosed  from  the  weather,  screened 
against  insects,  is  noise-proof,  and  has  one 
12-inch  speaker  erected  above  the  plate 
glass  and  in  the  direct  center  of  the  build- 
ing. In  addition  there  is  parking  space 
right  at  the  door.” 

PLANS  FOR  EXPANSION 

If  the  “walk-in”  meets  with  the  success 
that  is  anticipated,  Mr.  Martin  plans  to 
erect  a second  building  promptly  with  the 
entrance  between,  thus  enabling  one  door- 
man to  take  care  of  70  patrons.  “There  is 
room  on  this  eighth  ramp  for  23  buildings 
of  the  same  size,”  he  declares,  “and  there 
is  nothing  to  prevent  ramp  nine,  etc.,  each 
with  an  840-patron  capacity.” 

At  the  official  opening  of  the  “walk-in,” 
to  which  a number  of  prominent  exhibitors 
were  invited,  iVIr.  Martin  served  his 
guests  two  refreshment  innovations.  One 
was  the  “Hugh  Martin  special  scrambled 
hot  dog.”  It  consists  of  a frankfurter  cov- 
ered with  fresh,  crisp  popcorn  (oyster 
crackers  are  not  available  in  Florida  dur- 
ing the  summer  and  he  had  to  select  a 
substitute)  and  then  doused  with  hot 
chile,  garnished  with  a slice  of  pickle  and 
served  stuck  into  a wooden  fork.  It  sells 
for  35^  at  the  Clervue  refreshment  stand. 

The  second  “treat”  was  a pickled  coke, 
the  idea  for  w’hich  Mr.  Martin  acquired 
from  an  exhibitor  in  Sayre,  Okla.,  when 
he  passed  through  there  on  a recent  trip. 
This  is  the  Oklahoman’s  technique  as 


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BETTER  THEATRES  SECTION 


31 


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At  the  official  opening  of  the  "walk-in"  section  of  the  Clervue  drive-in  the  front  row  of  seats  was  occu- 
pied by  Bill  Cumbaa,  general  manager  of  MCM  Theatres;  Hugh  Martin,  owner  of  the  Clervue  and  a 
partner  in  MCM;  Norris  McCollum,  Tampa  theatre  manager;  and  Pat  and  Don  McCaffrey,  the  first 
"walk-in"  patrons. 


described  by  Mr.  Martin:  “He  keeps  all 
his  pickle  juice,  also  strains  his  relish  juice 
through  a cloth  and  adds  that  to  the  sup- 
ply. Then  he  uses  a ‘cradle’  as  any  bar- 
tender uses,  a clear  glass  quart  bottle  with 
a label  of  ‘pickle  juice’  thereon,  nothing 
more.  After  drawing  a Coca-Cola  he  adds 
one  spoonful  of  pickle  juice,  then  stirs. 
Those  oil  workers  really  line  up  to  buy 
them !’’ 

A JOINT  PROMOTION 

In  addition  to  the  Clervue  Mr.  Martin 
operates  an  indoor  theatre  at  Clermont 
called  the  Lake.  A few  months  ago  he  in- 
stalled new  seats  in  it  throughout  (supplied 
by  Theatre  Seat  Service  Company,  Nash- 
ville, Tenn.)  and  introduced  what  he  calls 
“another  first  for  Florida’’ — a four- line, 
double-face  attraction  board  with  a large 
time-and-temperature  clock  above  it. 
“There  is  one  such  in  Columbus,  Ga.,’’  he 
asserts,  “and  does  it  attract  everybody’s 
attention !’’ 

(i)n  some  occasions  Mr.  Martin  has  used 
the  same  stunt  to  promote  attendance  at 
both  his  Clermont  theatres.  A recent  one 
also  enabled  him  simultaneously  to  “take 
a lick”  at  the  television  competition!  “The 
only  reason  I did  that,”  he  explains,  “is 
because  my  enthusiastic  next  door  mer- 
chant, the  TV^  man  in  town,  has  his  dis- 
play window  next  to  my  theatre,  dressed 
for  the  occasion — and  a card  printed  ‘Make 
Your  Living  Room  Your  Theatre — oh 
yeah !’  ” 

In  this  stunt  he  used  specially  printed 
cards  each  bearing  one  word  in  a complete 
sentence.  Patrons  had  to  collect  23  of  the 
cards  to  make  up  the  sentence,  and  when 
they  had  done  so  they  were  entitled  to  a 
free  pass. 

d'he  sentence  chosen  was  as  follows:  “A 


family  of  three  can  attend  the  (Lake- 
Clervue)  Theatres  twice  weekly  for  $104 
yearly — can  you  beat  the  208  hours  of  en- 
tertainment elsewhere?” 


Always  willing  to  share  his  promotional 
schemes  with  others,  Mr.  IMartin  has  re- 
called his  experiences  in  this  respect  when 
he  was  a district  manager  for  a circuit  in 
years  gone  by. 

“There  is  ver\'  little  new  even  in  show 
business,  as  you  know,”  he  said.  “I  would 
pick  up  a trick  that  helped  business  in  a 
town,  carry  it  over  the  circuit,  show  the 
various  managers  just  how  this  stunt  helped 
the  other  fellow’s  business — and  leave  a 
sample.  Took  me  four  weeks  to  cover  the 
circuit. 

“Then  on  my  next  trip,  I’d  see  a dif- 
ferent version  of  that  same  stunt,  some 
failures,  but  also  I’d  encounter  improve- 
ments. Before  the  stunt  was  worn  out, 
the  originator  would  not  recognize  it  as 
having  been  his  or  her  original  idea!” 


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SHARING  GOOD  IDEAS 


32 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  7,  1956 


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changing  shoes,  sprockets,  rollers  or  tracks.  Apertures  in 
ten  ratios. 

HIGHEST  EFFICIENCY  WITH  2-25/32"  and  4"  DIA.  LENSES, 
ANY  FOCAL  LENGTH,  any  make.  Lenses  held  firmly  to  the 
housing  on  “V”  rails.  The  picture  stays  on  the  screen. 

PERMITS  CORRECT  WORKING  DISTANCE  between  aperture 
and  14",  16"  or  18"  mirror  of  new  type  arc  lamps. 

BRIGHTEST  PICTURES  on  screens  of  any  size.  Barrel  shutter 
(available  with  52°,  60°  or  72°  blades)  and  heat  baffle 
ojjenings  pass  maximum  light.  No  flicker  or  travel  ghost. 

MOST  THREADING  ROOM  OF  ANY  PROJECTOR.  Film  gate 
opens  full  inch.  Lighted  framing  aperture. 

NO  IN-AND-OUT  FOCUS  CONDITION.  Variable  shoe  tension 
instantly  adjustable  to  green,  warped  or  buckled  film  of 
any  thickness. 

THE  ONLY  PROJECTOR  WHICH  CONTROLS  FILM  SWAY.  Guide 
rollers  self-adjust  to  film  width. 


ROCK-STEADY  PICTURES  assured  by  Motiograph’s  patented 
method  of  affixing  intermittent  sprocket  to  star  shaft, 
and  precision-made  star,  cam  and  sprocket. 

PARTS  CHANGEABLE  BETWEEN  REELS-aperture,  tracks,  shoes, 
upper  magazine  rollers.  Intermittent  movement  remov- 
able from  operating  side.  Intermittent  sprocket  reversed 
without  removing  assemblies.  Quickly  removable  stud- 
mounted  gear  and  bearing  assembly. 

INTERCHANGEABLE  WITH  PRACTICALLY  ANY  PROJECTOR 
MECHANISM.  No  new  soundhead  drives  required.  Accepts 
virtually  all  penthouse  reproducers  and  upper  magazines. 

QUIET  RUNNING,  compressed  linen  gears  against  hardened 
steel.  No  metal  to  metal,  hence  unbelievably  long  service. 
Run  on  double-row  lifetime-lubricated  ball  bearings. 

PARTS  AVAILABLE  AT  LEAST  20  YEARS.  That’s  Motiograph 
policy. 

COOL  OPERATION.  Water  cooled  gates  and  aperture  cool- 
ing blowers  optional. 


V 


Your  Motiograph  dealer  will  gladly  demonstrate  the  AAA— the  finest  projector  in  history.  He  has  a 

liberal  financing  plan.  Write  today  lor  literature. 


P!r-' 


IN  THE 


i y 


has  the  most  important 
motion  picture  property  in  16  years . 

MacKINLAY  KANTOR’S 


_as  reported  in  the  book  sections 
of  the  N.  Y.  Sunday  Timm 

and  the  hi.  Y Sunday  Herald ‘ 

'./i' 

'I 


TrUwt, 


J^UARY  14,  19)6 


I -B,  ^ 4,'^  ... 

^^KT  MY^jW^  UP,  FURY  AT  GUNSI^KT^^^SSj 

” , THE  world  ENDED,  THE  PHA^f7ifeM 

- ':S:^  ■' 


mt  XtTtf  y^^^'i‘City_.  f^-.  S.  A.,  uujer  3S79.  ■ ^ ‘ 

HiicieftUfr  )>>./;  iifl,-  iV>  ■'  '45-00 ' 


Mi  cotfffntf  ’^-fPyrigkirri  19^ 


hon^°' 

the  latest  blogtaP^/,^"' 

academy  cOMPANIO*^- 

VVOMAN’SH  J^onlh" 

"picture 

AAAER'^^^j^fn  Hayw*'*^' 

"Salutes  hu 

COSMO  PO';|t*^s-'S“^»'' 

Performance^ 


j^,YR\CHAK 

“""'tA^RENCEVItVNGAB 


Left: 

Susan  Hayward 
in  the  role  of 
Lillian  Roth, 
a performance 
to  remember!  ^ 


FIRST  TWO  DATES 
ARE  YOUR  TIP-OFF! 

CHICAGO 

Tops  every  M-G-M  picture 
including  ”GWTW”  at 
United  Artist  Theatre. 

LOS  ANGELES 
Breaks  every  record  in  the 
entire  history  of  the 
4-Star  Theatre. 

NEXT! 

Sensational  opening  at 
Radio  City  Music  Hall. 

Long  run  forecast! 


M-G-M  WEEK-FEB.  5-11  • “An  M-G-M  Picture  On  Every  Screen  of  the  World" 


^3^ - - 


Time  was 

RUNNING  OUT 
FOR 

Steve  Rollins 

AND  so 

WERE  HIS 
FRIENDS! 


Those  were  his  fingerprints  on  t 
on  his  wife  ! The  story  of  a man 
that  turned  into 


Actually  filmed  on  the  San 


w„„WlLLIAM  DEMAREST-  PAUL  STEWART  • PERRY  LOPEZ  • FAY  WRAY 

DIRECTED  BY  FRANK 


WARNER  BROS. 

PRESENT 


ALAN 


LADD 


A fall-guy  who  got  up.. 


EDW.  G. 
ROBINSON 

Czar  of  the  bay-front... 


JOANNE 


She  went  one  guy  too  far. 


gun  —those  weren’t  his  fingerprints 
pride  — his  anger- and  vengeance 


Francisco  bay-front  in  CiNemaScoPE  and  WarnerColor 

SCREEN  PLAY  BY  SYDNEY  BOEHM  AND  MARTIN  RACKIN  music  8V  MAX  STEINER  A JAGUAR  PRODUCTION 

TUTTLE  PRESENTED  BY  WARNER  BROS. 


DEMONSTRATES 
IN  THE 

FOLLOWING  CITIES 


JAN.  23 

NEW  YORK 

ROXY 

LOS  ANGELES 

VILLAGE 

CHICAGO  . 

UPTOWN  * 

JAN.  24 

BOSTON 

MEMORIAL 

SAN  FRANCISCO 
FOX 

INDIANAPOLIS 

INDIANA 

JAN.  25 

PHILADELPHIA 

FOX 

PORTLAND,  Ore. 

FOX 

CINCINNATI 

ALBEE 

JAN.  26 

WASHINGTON 

PALACE 

SEATTLE 
5th  AVENUE 

DETROIT 

FOX 

JAN.  27 

CHARLOTTE 

CAROLINA 

SPOKANE 

FOX 

CLEVELAND 

PALACE 

Projection  in  35mm  Prints  • No  Changes  Required  in  the  Booth  of  Theatres  Equipped  for  Stereophonic  Sound 


BE  SURE 
TO  ATTEND! 

AH  showings  start 
promptly  at  9:45  A.M. 
except  ROXY,  N.  Y.,  which 
begins  at  9:15  A.M. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD 


MARTIN  QUIGLEY,  EiUtor-in-Chief  and  Publisher 


Vol.  202,  No.  2 


MARTIN  QUIGLEY,  JR.,  Editor 


January  14,  1956 


Carping  Criticism 

Recent  expressions  on  this  page  have  come  in  for 
critical  attention  from  such  widely  divergent  pub- 
lications as  the  New  York  Times  and  the  Motion 
Picture  Exhibitor.  It  is  a source  of  some  satisfaction 
that  the  distinguished  film  critic  of  the  Times,  Bosley 
Crowther,  and  the  veteran  theatre  operator  and  part-time 
publisher,  Jay  Emanuel,  read  the  editorials  in  The 
HERALD.  It  is  a source  of  some  regret — and  confusion 
to  their  readers — that  these  two  gentlemen  apparently 
“read  as  they  run,”  with  hit  and  miss  results. 

The  two  criticisms  of  The  HERALD  editorials  have 
this  much  in  common : both  Messrs.  Crowther  and 
Emanuel  have  sat  down  at  their  typewriters  seeming  to 
defend  Eric  Johnston  but  quite  obviously  to  assail  the 
publisher  of  The  HERALD. 

Mr.  Emanuel  has  attacked  the  publisher  of  The 
HERALD  for  alleged  intransigence  with  respect  to  the 
Production  Code.  Mr.  Emanuel  is  particularly  aroused 
about  the  narcotic  provision  of  the  Code.  If  he  had  been 
aroused  some  weeks  earlier,  he  would  have  noted  that 
the  publisher  of  The  HERALD  — on  this  page  — urged 
that  the  Motion  Picture  Association  deal  forthrightly 
with  the  issue,  making  a change  in  the  Code  provision 
but  maintaining  reasonable  safeguards.  This,  for  Mr. 
Emanuel’s  belated  information,  is  precisely  the  same 
position  held  by  Mr.  Johnston  and  the  members  of  his 
executive  staff. 

The  HERALD  has  repeatedly  pointed  out  over  the 
past  two  decades  that  the  Production  Code  involves  two 
sets  of  provisions — those  dealing  with  basic  principles 
which  are  unchangeable  and  those  dealing  with  matters 
of  policy.  These  latter  are  subject  to  revision,  addition 
and  elimination  as  need  indicates.  Two  years  ago  The 
HERALD  on  this  page  called  for  ending  the  ridiculous 
ban  on  the  use  of  the  words  “hell”  and  “damn.”  That 
action  was  taken.  The  HERALD  believes  that  sooner 
or  later  the  outright  ban  on  the  mention  of  narcotics  will 
be  dropped.  The  subject  needs  to  be  handled  with  rea- 
sonable safeguards. 

Mr.  crowther  is  perturbed  that  The  HER- 
ALD objected  to  certain  statements  made  at  a 
press  conference  called  recently  by  Mr.  Johns- 
ton in  Hollywood.  One  point  criticised  was  the  com- 
ment by  Mr.  Johnston  that  occasioned  a wave  of  “in- 
dustry depression”  headlines  in  newspapers  across  the 
country.  Mr.  Crowther  said  that  Mr.  Johnston’s  state- 
ments were  true.  The  HERALD  had  no  dispute  with 
Mr.  Johnston  on  the  facts  about  business  in  the  Fall  of 
1955  being  appreciably  below  that  of  the  same  period  in 
the  preceding  year.  The  point  was  whether  any  useful 
purpose  was  served  by  the  president  of  the  Motion  Pic- 


ture Association  proclaiming  such  a state  of  affairs  to 
the  nation’s  press. 

It  is  to  be  doubted  that  Mr.  Crowther  really  disagrees 
with  The  HERALD  on  this  issue.  He  is  too  astute  a 
student  of  film  tastes  to  overlook  the  psychological  fac- 
tors involved  in  theatre  attendance.  The  public  loves  a 
winner.  Few  people  want  to  attend  unpopular  pictures 
in  uncrowded  theatres.  In  this  there  is  nothing  unique 
about  motion  pictures.  The  same  situation  prevails  in 
all  show  business  and  to  some  extent  in  all  business  de- 
pending on  widespread  public  support.  The  New  York 
Times  itself  is  quick  to  proclaim  significant  gains  in  ad- 
vertising and  copy  sales.  It  does  not  rush  out  and  make 
a great  display  of  statistics  reflecting  the  inevitable  peri- 
ods of  less  than  satisfactory  progress. 

The  HERALD  does  not  expect  unanimous  approval 
of  its  editorial  positions.  If  that  occurred  it  would  mean 
that  the  expressions  were  as  spineless  as  jellyfish,  of 
which  there  is  an  abundance  in  the  motion  picture  trade 
press.  However,  it  is  to  be  hoped  that  in  the  interest  of 
diminishing  confusion  that  writers  who  venture  to  com- 
ment on  editorial  expressions  familiarize  themselves  with 
the  true  positions  taken  before  rushing  into  print. 

■ B ■ 

UA  Promise  & Performance 

The  new  management  team  at  United  Artists  has 
now  completed  five  years  with  a record  of  out- 
standing accomplishment.  When  the  group  took 
control  in  February,  1951  it  was  confidently  predicted 
on  the  record  that  Arthur  Krim,  Robert  Benjamin,  Mat- 
thew Fox,  William  Heineman  and  Max  Youngstein 
would  rescue  the  company  from  its  long  standing  diffi- 
culties. Both  the  speed  of  the  recovery  and  the  subse- 
quent expansion  of  UA  business  have  been  remarkable. 

Five  years  ago  an  editorial  on  this  page  welcoming 
the  “New  Deal  for  UA”  pointed  out  that  the  industry 
needs  a strong  and  prosperous  company  offering  dis- 
tribution and  financing  facilities  to  independent  pro- 
ducers. 

The  new  group,  which  has  changed  only  with  the  addi- 
tion of  Arnold  Picker  and  the  recent  withdrawal  of  Mr. 
Fox,  faces  the  next  five  years  with  confidence  that  the 
excellent  mark  set  thus  far  will  be  surpassed.  The  world 
gross  of  UA  rose  from  $18,000,000  in  1951  to  an  esti- 
mated $55,000,000  for  1955.  Within  the  next  years  the 
figure  is  expected  to  reach  at  least  $75,000,000.  The  com- 
pany’s releases  for  1956  include  an  unexcelled  galaxy  of 
popular  stars,  cast  in  important  story  properties.  The 
UA  management  team  has  earned  the  right  to  look 
bright-eyed  to  the  company’s  future. 

— Martin  Quigley,  Jr. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD 


csCettet'6  io  tlie  ^.J^ercLicl 


January  14,  1956 


Optimistic 

To  THE  Editor: 

There’s  nothing  that  a good  picture  can- 
not cure,  and  those  words  are  as  true  now 
as  they  \\’ere  when  first  uttered  several 
years  ago  by  Mr.  Nicholas  Schenck  of  the 
Loew’s  circuit.  I have  personally  found 
that  if  a theatre  situated  in  a saturated  tele- 
vision area  can  render  top-notch  quality 
product  (and  that’s  what  we’re  getting  to- 
day from  Hollywood)  plus  all  the  newest 
of  mediums  such  as  CinemaScope,  Vista- 
\’ision  and  SuperScope,  plus  a modern  de- 
luxe air-conditioned  theatre,  it  can  have  a 
strong  chance  for  survival  and  increased 
patronage.  Where  television  has  been  in 
force  since  inception — here  especially,  from 
Buffalo,  WBEN-TV  since  1949 — the  nov- 
elty is  beginning  to  wear  off  such  as  radio 
experienced  in  the  thirties,  although  you 
will  always  find  die-hards.  Nevertheless, 
the  urge  to  “get  out”  is  there  and  we  are 
experiencing  it  all  the  time.  We  have  just 
made  a complete  modernization  job  and  are 
doing  business  that  we  have  not  had  since 
1949.  This  all  goes  to  prove  that  comfort 
and  quality  product  will  carry  you  over  the 
hump.  We  here  have  just  as  much  opposi- 
tion as  perhaps  anybody  anywhere,  what 
with  first  run  theatres  months  ahead  of  us 
in  product  at  St.  Catharine’s  and  Niagara 
Falls,  Ont.,  and  also  the  larger  cities  of 
Buffalo  and  Niagara  Falls,  N.  Y.,  with  their 
clubs  and  larger  theatres  drawing  off  a large 
share  of  our  trade.  Then  you  have  domestic 
opposition  such  as  stock-car  racing,  Ft.  Erie 
race  track  (the  biggest  and  finest  in  all 
Canada)  plus  a huge  arena  for  wrestling, 
hockey,  boxing,  etc.  However,  movies  still 
are  better  than  ever. — G.  J.  FORHAN , JR., 
Capitol  Theatre,  Wellatid,  Ontario,  Canada. 

• 

Held  Up 

To  THE  Editor: 

My  main  problem  is  playing  behind  a 
chain  indoor  house.  They  can’t  possibly  play 
all  the  first  run  pictures,  but  I get  held  back 
so  long  that  I can’t  get  anything  hot.  When 
I do,  the  film  companies  wait  until  I’m 
ready  to  play  and  pull  the  picture.  I’m  left 
with  all  my  advertising  ruined  on  the  show. 
My  situation  is  small  and  the  population 
scattered.  Advertising  is  hard  to  get  and 
costly. — /.  IV.  MULLER,  Citrus  Drive-In, 
Hernando,  Fla. 

Wants  Young  Blood 

To  THE  Editor: 

My  problem  is  not  any  different  from  any 
of  the  others  in  this  business.  Television  cut 


in  on  our  business,  but  with  product  getting 
better  every  year,  I think  our  problems  will 
iron  themselves  out,  as  they  occur.  What  I 
would  like  to  know  is,  what  happened  to  the 
studio  tliat  made  all  those  heartwarming 
Lassie  pictures,  and  the  Shirley  Temple 
pictures?  Certainly,  there  is  enough  young 
talent  on  television  and  elsewhere  to  take 
the  place  of  that  lovely  little  girl  who  walked 
into  everyone’s  heart.  I hope  someone  gets 
wise  and  starts  things  rolling  to  make  such 
pictures. — STEVE  KOV ACS , Roxy  Thea- 
tre, Kingsville,  Ontario,  Canada. 

• 

"Magnificent  Job" 

To  Charles  S.  Aaronsuin  . 

Over  the  past  holiday  weekends,  ] nave 
just  had  an  opportunity,  for  the  first  time,  lo 
really  go  through  the  “International  Motion 
Picture  Almanac”  from  cover  to  cover. 

It  is  a magnificent  job  of  compilation, 
editing  and  review,  and  my  hat  is  off  to  you 
and  all  of  those  who  were  associated  with  it. 
It  is  certainly  a tremendous  well  of  informa- 
tion about  our  industry,  and  anyone  who  has 
any  real  interest  in  our  business  certainly 
should  take  advantage  of  it.  And  I certainly 
am.— CHARLES  SIMONELLI,  Universal 
Pictures  Company,  New  York. 

• 

For  Midweek 

To  THE  Editor: 

Our  main  problem  is  getting  top  pictures 
for  mid-week  play  time.  This  problem  has 
been  alleviated  to  some  extent  recently.  We 
find  that  we  can  do  above  average  business 
on  Wednesday/Thursday  play  time  if  we 
have  a top  picture — naturally.  The  distrib- 
utors want  top  play  time  for  nearly  all  prod- 
uct and  seem  to  believe  the  exhibitor  does 
not  need  mid-week  product.  As  stated  above, 
however,  this  problem  is  being  solved. — 
E.  A.  PITTMAN,  J.  J.  EDWARDS,  Rite 
Theatre,  Hammond,  La. 

New  Faces 

To  THE  Editor  : 

I think  the  producers  are  signing  too 
many  older  people  for  their  pictures,  such 
as  James  Cagney,  Humphrey  Bogart,  Fred 
Astaire,  and  others.  They  should  try  to  put 
younger  people  in  the  parts,  because  it  is 
the  younger  set  that  are  moviegoers.  They 
don’t  want  to  see  those  older  stars.' — 
FRANK  OGLUTTI , Penn  Theatre,  Leech- 
burg,  Pa. 


Page 


HOLLYWOOD  EYES  television  as  a 
nev/ source  of  product  12 

TELEVISION  ALMANAC  makes  ini- 
tial appearance  as  service  annual  16 

THREAT  SEEN  to  screen  copyrights 
in  court  ruling  1 6 

HOWARD  HUGHES  buys  back  two 
feature  films  from  RKO  17 

SALES  PLANS  for  20th-Fox  films  set 
at  New  York  meeting  20 

TOA  ALARMED  at  sale  of  films  to 
television  2 1 

WINNERS  NAMED  in  poll  of  tele- 
vision for  Fame  21 

FINLAND  to  honor  British  films  in 
special  promotion  24 

ALAN  LADD  says  one-release  deal  is 
better  26 

DECISION  in  Schine  Case  is  reserved 
by  judge  30 

STUDY  of  public's  trends  and  tastes 
urged  by  Adolph  Zukor  33 

DISNEY  PRODUCTIONS  report 
profit  up  to  $ 1 ,352,576  36 

NATIONAL  SPOTLIGHT— Notes  on 
personne’  across  country  38 

SERVICE  DEPARTMENTS 

Refreshment  Merchandising  47 

Film  Buyers'  Rating  34 

Hollywood  Scene  33 

Managers'  Round  Table  43 

The  Winners'  Circle  30 

IN  PRODUCT  DIGEST  SECTION 

Showmen's  Reviews  737 

Short  Subjects  738 

Short  Subjects  Chart  739 

The  Release  Chart  740 

Release  Chart  by  Company  745 


/lOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  Martin  Quigley,  Edlt»r-!n- 
;hlef  and  Publisher;  Martin  Quigley,  Jr.,  Editor;  Raymond 
.evy,  Executive  Publisher;  James  D._  Ivers,  News  Ediior, 
Charles  S.  Aaronson,  Production  Editor;  Floyd  E.  bt^e, 
'hoto  Editor;  Ray  Gallagher,  Advertising  Manager;  Gus 
t Fausel  Production  Manager.  Bureaus:  Hollywood, 

omuel  D.  Berns,  Manager:  William  R.  Weaver,  Editor, 
'ucca-Vlne  Building,  Telephone  HOI  lywood  7-2145; 

;hlcago,  120  So.  LaSalle  St.,  Urbci  Farley,  Advertising 
lepresentatlve.  Telephone  FInonclal  6-3074;  Washington, 
. A.  Otten,  National  Press  Club;  London,  Hope  Williams 
lurniip  Manager;  Peter  Burnup,  Editor;  Wllllam_  Pay, 
Jews  Editor,  4 Golden  Square.  Correspondents  in  thj 
irlnclpal  capitals  of  the  world.  Member  Audit  Bureau  of 
;irculatlons.  Motion  Picture  Herald  Is  published  every 
aturday  by  Quigley  Publishing  Company,  Inc.,  Roc^- 
eller  Center,  New  York  City  20.  Telephone  Circle  7;3  00, 
;able  address;  "Qulgpubco,  New  York",  Martin  Quigley, 
'resident*  Martin  Quigley,  Jr.,  Vice-President;  Theo.  J. 
ulllvan  Vice-President  and  Treasurer;  Raymond  Levy, 
'Ice-Presldent,  Leo  J.  Brady,  Secretary.  Other  Quigley 
'ubilcatlons:  Better  Theatres  and  Better  Refreshment  Mer- 
handlslng,  each  published  thirteen  times  a year  as  a 
ectlon  of  Motion  Picture  Herald;  Motion  Picture  Daily, 
elevislon  Today,  Motion  Picture  Almanac,  Television 
almanac.  Fame. 


8 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  l<?56 


WHEN  AND  WHERE 


On  the  JJ’i 


orizon 


BATTLE  PLANS 

COMPO  within  a week  or  two 
will  begin  fighting  the  admis- 
sions tax.  This  is  the  word  from 
New  York  headquarters.  The 
"steering  committee"  for  the 
battle  will  meet  in  that  city 
or  in  Washington.  It  will  com- 
prise delegates  from  charter 
organizations.  The  home  office 
meanwhile  is  collating  statis- 
tics on  the  state  of  the  indus- 
try. The  committee  probably 
will  invite  Allied,  Robert 
Coyne,  COMPO  counsel,  said. 

RECORD  FOR  "GUYS" 

Samuel  Goldwyn's  "Guys  and 
Dolls"  is  piling  up  some  rec- 
ords in  its  first  48  engage- 
ments, all  of  which  are  still  in 
progress.  As  of  January  5,  the 
musical  extravaganza  had 
grossed  $4,200,000.  Eight  of 
the  engagements  began  in  Novem- 
ber and  the  other  40  on  Decem- 
ber 23.  The  dates  range  from 
New  York,  Baltimore,  St.  Louis 
and  Miami  to  Toronto  and  Mon- 
treal. At  the  Capitol  in  New 
York  it  had  grossed  $775,000  at 
the  end  of  its  ninth  week. 

TV  m FRANCE 

As  it  must  to  all  theatres, 
television  has  come  to  France. 
And  in  the  areas  where  the  work- 
ers are  well  heeled  enough  to 
buy  sets,  the  cinemas  are  feel- 
ing the  blow.  To  the  extent,  our 
correspondent  says,  of  as  much 
as  a 50  per  cent  box  office  de- 
cline. There  is,  however,  a 
sliver  of  retaliation.  The  tax- 
man  is  to  go  after  "public  tele- 
vision" ; that  is,  in  bars  and 
cafes.  Cafe  owners,  our  man 
again  reports,  are  very  glad 
to  pay  it. 

REWARD 

Warners  will  be  watching  the 
Supreme  Court  these  days  for  a 
$1,000,000  decision  it  is  cer- 
tain it  cannot  lose,  but  then 
you  never  can  tell.  Jules  Gar- 
rison this  week  appealed  to 
that  court  against  lower  court 
decisions  that  he  isn't  en- 
titled to  Warners'  reward  for 
anyone  who  could  prove  Burt 
Lancaster  in  "The  Flame  and  the 


Arrow"  didn't  perform  all  those 
dangerous  stunts.  Mr.  Garrison 
claims  sttint  man  Don  Turner  did 
some.  Previous  courts  have 
said  Mr.  Turner  executed  none 
of  the  really  hard  stunts,  and 
anyway  the  company  withdrew  its 
reward  before  the  claim. 


The  National  Association  of 
Radio  and  Television  Broad- 
casters has  decided  to  step  up 
sharply  its  campaign  to  inform 
the  public  about  the  operations 
of  the  television  program  code. 
The  Association  said  in  Wash- 
ington this  week  it  had  decided 
that  a successfully  operating 
code  would  be  the  best  answer  to 
criticisms  of  the  content  of  TV 
programs,  and  that  a better 
public  understanding  of  the 
code  and  support  for  it  would 
help  make  it  successful. 


Theatre  Equipment  and  Supply 
Manufacturers  Association  will 
hold  its  1957  trade  show  and 
convention  at  the  Hotel  Sherman 
in  Chicago,  September  8-15,  it 
was  determined  at  a TESMA  board 
meeting  in  New  York  Tuesday. 
Merlin  Lewis,  executive  secre- 
tary, said  invitations  will  go 
to  exhibitors  and  other  inde- 
pendent groups  seeking  an  an- 
nual convention  in  conjunction 
with  the  TESMA  show. 

SKY  TOUR 

Charles  Lindbergh's  tiny 
plane  the  "Spirit  of  St. 
Louis",  built  in  replica  for 
the  Warner  picture  of  that 
name,  is  flying  again  and  may 
be  piloted  cross  country  soon 
by  Jimmy  Stewart,  star  of  the 
picture.  An  expert  pilot,  the 
star  who  with  the  help  of 
friends  built  one  of  three  rep- 
licas of  the  famous  Ryan  mono- 
plane, is  planning  a tour  of  key 
cities  in  advance  of  the  open- 
ings of  the  picture  scheduled 
for  the  Spring. 

TAX  CUT 

One  Senator  of  some  renown 
has  come  over  to  our  side  pub- 
licly. Senator  Douglas  of  II- 


January  29:  Sixth  annual  Communion  Break- 
for  Catholics  of  the  motion  picture  industry 
In  the  New  York  area,  Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel,  New  York  City. 

January  29-31:  Annual  convention  of  the 

Theatre  Owners  of  North  and  South  Caro- 
lina, Hotel  Charlotte,  Charlotte,  N.  C. 

January  30:  Regular  mid-winter  meeting  of 
the  lATSE  general  executive  board,  Holly- 
wood-Roosevelt  Hotel,  Hollywood. 

February  2:  Commencement  of  hearings,  be- 
fore the  Senate  Small  Business  Subcommit- 
tee, on  trade  practice  complaints  of  motion 
picture  exhibitors,  Washington,  D.  C. 

February  5:  Fifth  annual  Communion  Break- 
fast for  Catholics  of  the  motion  picture 
industry  in  the  Los  Angeles  area,  Holly- 
wood Paladlum,  Hollywood. 

February  7-9:  Annual  convention  of  United 
Theatre  Owners  of  Oklahoma,  Skirvin  Ho- 
tel, Oklahoma  City. 

February  20:  Testimonial  dinner  to  M.  B. 

Horwitz,  veteran  Cleveland  exhibitor.  Ho- 
tel Hollenden,  Cleveland. 

February  21-23:  1956  National  Drive-ln  Con- 
vention, Hotel  Cleveland,  Cleveland. 

March  6-7:  Annual  convention  of  the  Kansas- 
Missourl  Theatre  Association,  President  Ho- 
tel, Kansas  City,  Mo. 


linois  said  last  week  he  wants 
Congress  to  collect  billions 
for  the  Treasury  by  "plugging 
various  tax  loopholes"  and 
then  cut  admissions  and  other 
excise  taxes. 


No  less  than  25  per  cent  of 
our  mature  population  can't  re- 
member the  last  time  they  went 
to  a movie.  National  Theatres 
asserts  after  polling  500  fam- 
ilies in  Milwaukee.  The  survey 
also  shows,  according  to  the 
circuit ' s magazine , "Showman", 
that  teen-agers  are  the  fre- 
quent moviegoers. 


Japanese  theatre  men  are  most 
interested  in  the  Japan  Broad- 
casting Corporation's  survey 
of  mass  communications.  Five 
one  hundredths  of  one  per  cent 
of  Japanese  households  own  a 
television  set.  Movie  attend- 
ance last  year  was  830,000,000. 

Floyd  E.  Stone — Vincent 
Canby — William  R.  Weaver 


CODE  PUSH 


TESMA  - 1957 


CAN'T  REMEMBER 


SMALL  CLOUD 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


9 


THE  PLEDGE  OF  SERVICE.  The  scene  at  the  New  York  Variety  Club,  Tent  35, 
installation  ot  otRcers  Monday.  The  administrating  officer  Is  Ralph  Preis,  left,  and 
seated  at  his  right  Is  Harold  Klein,  whom  he  swore  in  as  new  chief  barker. 
Members  of  the  new  crew  whom  you  see  are  Jack  Hoffberg,  Bob  Shapiro,  Martin 
Levine,  and  George  Brandt.  How  much  Variety  means  in  service  to  other  hu- 
mans, especially  some  who  remain  unnamed  but  are  show  business  veterans,  and 
how  much  It  means  to  him  personally  was  explained  by  Mr.  Klein  as  he  took 
office  and  asked  for  support  especially  of  the  international  convention  which 
his  tent  will  manage.  Robert  Coyne,  CCMPC  counsel,  and  luncheon  toastmaster, 
presented  retiring  chief  barker  William  J.  German,  whom  everyone  knows  as 
"Bill,"  with  a plaque  commemorating  his  energetic  service.  George  Hoover, 
Variety  International  chief  barker,  drew  the  parallel  between  Variety  and  com- 
munity service  and  noted  also  the  clubs  everywhere  seem  to  have  achieved  the 
respect  of  local  politicians  who  visit  the  clubs,  asking  cooperation  and  advice. 

THIS  IS  EXPLCITATICN,  on  the 
local  (approximately  1,000,000 
viewers,  at  least.  . .)  and  on  the 
national  (television,  of  course] 
levels.  The  scenes  at  the  right  are 
the  floats  purveying  acquaintance 
with  Hal  Wallis'  Paramount  pic- 
ture "The  Rose  Tattoo"  and  War- 
ners' "Helen  of  Troy,"  in  the  Pas- 
adena, Cal.,  Tournament  of  Roses 
Parade. 


ELMER  F.  LUX  Is  a name 
heard  these  days.  Installed 
thrice  as  Buffalo  Variety  chief 
barker,  just  now  retired  as 
Common  Council  president 
there,  and  termed  by  the  Buf- 
falo Evening  News  one  of  the 
Ten  Outstanding  Citizens  of 
1955,  he  Is  under  consideration 
by  Variety  Clubs  to  serve  as 
executive  director. 


by  the  Herald 

PERRY  LIEBER,  after  25  years  publicizing  RKO 
Radio  Pictures,  is  resigning,  the  company  an- 
nounced Tuesday  in  New  York,  where  it  had 
assigned  him  as  a national  director.  Mr.  Lieber 
previously  had  been  at  the  studio  as  publicity 
director.  Mr.  Lieber  is  returning  to  Hollywood. 


^Lid 


wee 


I 


by  the  Herald 


ICIU 


red 


THIS  IS  A BIG  DEAL.  In  New  York,  promoter  Mike 
Todd,  who  does  things  in  a big  way,  including  these 
days  the  big  65mm  Todd-AO  process,  signs  with 
United  Artists  for  release  of  his  "Around  the  World 
in  Eighty  Days."  With  him  are  board  chairman 
Robert  S.  Benjamin  and  president  Arthur  B.  Krim. 


THE  NEW  CREW  of  New  England's  Variety  Club 
poses  in  Boston.  Seated,  George  Roberts,  prop- 
erty master;  Michael  Redstone,  assistant  chief 
barker:  James  Marshall,  dough  guy.  Standing,  Ken- 
neth Douglass,  assistant  chief  barker;  Philip  Smith, 


THE  PRODIGAL  AND  THE  VETERAN.  Celebrating  his 
golden  wedding  in  Beverly  Hills,  72  year  old  cartoonist  Max 
Fleisher  (remember  "Betty  Boop,"  "Popeye,"  "Out  of  the 
Inkwell"?)  visited  Walt  Disney,  left,  at  the  latter's  Burbank 
studio.  With  them  is  son  Richard  Fleisher,  a director.  The 
senior  Fleisher  still  makes  films:  for  Navy  Training,  "top 
secret." 


CARRY  J.  HAWKINS  is  adver- 
tising manager  at  General  Pre- 
cision Equipment  Corporation. 
It  is  a new  position  and  Mr. 
Hawkins  comes  to  it  after  Pot- 
ter Instrument,  Fairchild  Cam- 
era & Instrument  and  Sittler 
Corporation.  GPE  through  22 
subsidiaries  manufactures  pre- 
cision equipment  for  the 
amusement  business  and  also 
and  mainly  for  general  and  de- 
fense industries. 


chief  barker;  and  Walter  A.  Brown,  retiring  chief 
barker,  now  international  canvasman. 


by  the  Herald 

THE  FIRST  OF  MANY  parties  at  which  John 
Wayne  will  be  presiding  occurred  Tuesday  in  New 
York  as  the  star  of  RKO's  "The  Conqueror"  met 
the  New  York  press  before  boarding  the  liner 
United  States  for  a month  of  friendly  contacts  in 
Europe.  The  picture  opens  internationally  and  then 
in  Washington. 


THE  RAFFLE,  to  benefit  Toronto's  Women  of  the  Motion 
Picture  Industry  club.  Rube  Bolstad,  Famous  Players  Can- 
adian vice-president,  draws  the  winning  ticket.  With  him, 
WOMPI  unit  president  Anne  Kaplan,  treasurer  Mrs.  Lillian 
Pooley,  and  director  Florence  Long.  The  affair  raised  $739 
for  WOMPI's  work,  including  these  past  holidays  Christmas 
baskets  which  cheered  ten  families. 


A MAN  OF  DECISIONS  and  distinction.  It's  Federal 
Judge  Michael  Igoe,  below,  center,  at  the  party  ac- 
companying the  "Oklahoma!"  Chicago  opening,  with 
friends  Jack  Kirsch,  Illinois  Allied  president,  and  John 
Balaban,  Balaban  and  Katz  circuit  president.  The  anti- 
trust case  judge,  as  he  may  be  called,  comes  to  a 
screening,  local  industry  observers  will  allow,  with 
knowledge  and  a singular  authority. 


HOLLYWOOD  EYES  TV  AS 
I\EW  PRODLCT  SOLRCE 


. . . Use  of  television's  best 
as  contributing  factor  in  the 
making  of  theatrical  films  only 
now  taking  place. 

by  JAY  REMER 

Mucli  has  been  written  recently  about  the 
opening  of  Hollywood’s  film  vaults  to  tele- 
vision. The  sale  of  old  features  by  RKO  and 
Columbia,  the  package  deal  for  Paramount 
short  subjects,  and  the  knowledge  that  other 
deals  are  inevitable  if  T\’’s  pocketbook  holds 
out,  have  lately  made  news.  However,  the 
reverse  of  this  new  trend  has  been  in  effect 
for  two  years  now,  and  to  Hollywood’s 
advantage. 

The  importation  of  television  talent  and 
properties  for  use  on  the  wide,  wide  screen 
started  slowly  at  first.  In  fact,  it  was  barely 
discernible  to  the  untutored  eye  and  ear. 
Perhaps  conservative  executives  were  un- 
willing to  admit  that  the  young  upstart,  tele- 
vision. was  able  to  contribute  to  Hollywood’s 
creative  force.  Perhaps  the  natural  fear  of 
competition  was  rearing  its  adverse  head 
again.  Whatever  the  reasons,  the  road  from 
the  television  studio  to  the  Hollywood  sound 
stage  was  long  and  almost  endless. 

Today,  a contrasting  situation  has  de- 
veloped. Just  as  Hollywood  has  relied  for 
much  of  its  material  on  best-selling  books 
and  noted  legitimate  plays  for  many  years, 
it  now  looks  with  an  acquisitive  eye  at  the 
television  screen.  Plays  and  novels  have  had 
the  double  advantage  of  cumulative  fame 
and  stories  that  need  only  to  he  adapted. 
Television  improves  on  these  by  supplying 
talent  and  material  that  millions  are  familiar 
with,  not  just  the  thousands  that  may  have 
read  a book  or  seen  a play.  No  one  can  deny 
the  tremendous  star-and-program-making 
power  the  television  audience  wields,  second 
only  to  the  film  public. 

Why  the  not  - so  - sudden  but  positive 
:hange?  The  answer  can't  be  pinpointed  but 
it  seems  Hollywood  has  learned  to  live 
amicably  with  its  youthful  sister  and  to 
realize  the  advantages  to  be  accrued.  The 
film  capital  has  been  feeding  television  huge 
amounts  of  talent  and  properties  for  years 
and  T\'  is  now  reciprocating. 

Three  ll  ere  Trail-hreakers 

.Although  the  exact  picture  or  personality 
responsible  for  the  trend  cannot  be  deter- 
mined, it  is  safe  to  assume  that  three  items 
were  the  major  contributors;  Lucille  Ball 
and  Desi  Arnaz  in  “The  Long  Long 
Trailer’’  representing  the  talent;  “Dragnet” 
representing  the  series  show,  and  “Marty” 
representing  the  individual  show.  Kach  of 
these  pictures  were  and  are  big  attractions 


GIVING  IT  BACK 

Hollywood  is  doing  its  share  of 
the  lend-lease  program,  too.  Recent- 
ly NBC  announced  John  Huston  and 
Joseph  Mankiewicz  had  signed  con- 
tracts to  produce  shows  for  television, 
in  addition  to  their  film  duties.  Hus- 
ton, in  particular,  came  up  with  some- 
thing unusual,  saying  his  program 
would  be  done  live  but  with  film  tech- 
niques. Other  film  notables  currently 
using  TV  to  show  off  their  talents  in- 
clude Alfred  Hitchcock,  Roy  Rogers, 
Loretta  Young,  Robert  Montgomery, 
Gene  Autry,  Douglas  Fairbanks,  Jr., 
Louis  Edelman  and,  of  course,  Walt 
Disney.  MGM,  20th-Fox  and  Warners 
each  have  a regular  network  series 
while  the  Screen  Directors  Guild  has 
its  own  Playhouse.  This  coming  season 
will  no  doubt  see  more  and  more  of 
this  mutually  beneficial  rapport. 


at  the  box  office  and  in  the  case  of  the  first 
two  at  least,  it  can  be  assumed  the  television 
source  was  a large  factor.  “Marty,”  on  the 
other  hand,  ])roved  that  originals  wdiich  are 
seen  but  that  one  time  and  then  disappear 
into  the  archives,  are  stuff  that  treasurers’ 
dreams  are  made  of. 

William  Dozier,  RKO's  vice-president  in 
charge  of  production  and  recently  a CBS 
executive,  has  announced  a policy  of  import- 
ing outstanding  television  personalities  for 
the  company’s  product.  He  said  RKO  plans 
to  seek  out  talent  that  had  come  into  its  own 
through  TV.  As  an  example  of  this,  the 
company  has  signed  David  Brian,  Barry 
Nelson  and  James  Arness  (leads  respec- 
tively in  tlie  television  shows,  “Mr.  District 
Attorney,”  “My  Favorite  Husband”  and 
“Gunsmoke”)  for  a new  film. 

Since  the  Ball -Arnaz  appearance,  many 
other  j)ersonalities  have  made  the  leap  from 
one  medium  to  the  other.  Some  of  these 
may  possibly  have  been  in  films  before,  but 
their  real  fame  came  through  the  picture 
tube.  Among  these  are  Jack  Webb,  Eva 
Marie  Saint,  Jack  Lemmon,  Rod  Steiger, 
Liberace  and  even  the  screen’s  number  one 
female  star,  Grace  Kelly.  Forthcoming  prod- 
uct featuring  others  in  this  category  include 
“The  Benny  Goodman  .Story”  with  Steve 
Allen,  “The  Birds  and  the  Bees”  with 
George  Gobel,  “The  Scarlet  Hour”  with 
Carol  Ohmart  and  "Crime  in  the  Streets” 
with  John  Cassavettes.  Ed  .Sullivan  is  sched- 
uled to  make  a feature  soon  for  Warners 
with  the  appropriate  title,  “The  Ed  Sullivan 
Story,”  while  Fess  Parker  has  just  doffed 
his  coonskin  cap  for  a new  Disney  film. 


The  talent  hasn't  been  confined  to  the 
actors  however.  Producers,  directors  and 
writers  are  also  making  the  changeover. 
Charles  Marquis  Warren,  who  was  writing 
screenplays  and  is  currently  ])ioducing 
“Gunsmoke,”  was  signed  by  RKO  to  direct 
“Tension  at  Table  Rock.’’  Herbert  Bayard 
Swope,  Jr.,  who  has  been  a producer  and/or 
director  for  CBS  and  NBC,  is  now  under 
contract  as  producer  for  20th  Century-Fox. 
Two  other  television  directors,  Alex  Segal 
and  Fielder  Cook  repeated  their  video  chores 
by  directing  the  screen  versions  of  “Fear- 
ful Decision”  (released  as  “Ramsom”  by 
MGM ) and  “Patterns”  for  UA. 

W riters  Do  Double  Duty 

Several  top  TV  writers  doing  double  duty 
are  the  well-known  Paddy  Chayefsky  for 
“Marty,”  Rod  Serling  for  “Patterns”  and 
Gore  Vidal,  a master  of  the  bizarre  who 
wrote  the  screenplay  of  “The  Catered  Af- 
fair” (MGM)  from  the  TV  play  by  Chayef- 
sky, a master  of  simplicity. 

At  least  five  television  series  have  been 
or  will  be  made  by  the  film  studios.  Besides 
“Dragnet’’  Warners  have  two  others  due 
for  release  soon,  “The  Lone  Ranger”  fea- 
turing Clayton  Moore  and  “Our  Miss 
Brooks’’  starring  Eve  Arden,  both  of  the 
original  casts.  Two  others  coming  up  are 
“Foreign  Intrigue”  which  Sheldon  Reynolds 
produced  for  UA  just  as  he  did  for  televi- 
sion, and  “Medic”  from  Allied  Artists. 

Perhaps  the  biggest  single  acquisition 
from  television,  though,  except  for  actors, 
is  the  original  story.  Rarely  a week  goes  by 
without  one  company  announcing  the  pur- 
chase of  a recent  television  play.  Among 
these  are  such  critically-acclaimed  items  as 
RKO’s  “Is  This  Our  Son?,”  winner  of  the 
Christopher  Award,  and  “Lady  and  the 
Prowler,’’  both  seen  on  “Climax.”  Inciden- 
tally, William  Dozier  purchased  the  latter 
for  television  when  he  was  at  CBS  and  pur- 
chased it  again  as  RKO’s  production  head. 

MGM  has  a batch  of  television  originals 
including  the  aforementioned  “Ransom”  and 
“Catered  Affair”  in  addition  to  Rod  Ser- 
ling’s  “The  Rack,”  “A  Man  Is  10  Feet  Tall 
and  “The  Last  Notch,”  the  latter  to  be 
filmed  as  “Fastest  Gun  Alive.”  UA,  besides 
“Marty”  and  “Patterns,”  has  three  others 
on  its  immediate  schedule  — Chayefsky’s 
“The  Bachelor  Party,”  to  be  made  by  the 
men  who  did  “Marty,”  and  “Twelve  Angry 
Men”  and  “The  Clown,”  both  to  be  pro- 
duced bv  Henry  Fondas  new  company. 
AA  has  “Crime  in  the  Streets”  which 
Reginald  Rose  adapted  from  his  own  script. 

Apparently  there  is  no  limit  to  this  com- 
paratively new  and  economically  feasible 
wedding  of  the  media.  It  now  seems  the  21- 
inch  screen  and  the  35mm  projector  are 
finally  catering  to  the  same  taste. 


12 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14,  1956 


1 


THE  FIRST  MOTION  PICTURE  IN 


^1 M i:  MASr  Aff%r 


N 


THE  PAGE 


Brother  against  brother,  man  against 
woman  in  the  Ranch  Society  Jungle 
of  today's  great  Southwest! 


VAN  JOHNSON  JOSEPH  GOTTEN 
RUTH  ROMAN  JACK  CARSON 

THE  BOTTOM  OF 
THE  BOTTLE  ^ 


COLOR  by  DELUXE 


with  Margaret  Hayes, 

Bruce  Bennett,  Brad  Dexter 
Produced  by  BUDDY  ADLER 
Directed  by  HENRY  HATHAWAY 
Screenplay  by  SYDNEY  BOEHM 
From  a story 
by  Georges  Simenon 


The  strangest  spy  story  in  the  annals 
of  naval  espionage! 

TON  WEBB  GLORIA  GRAHAME 

the 

MAN  WHO 
NEVER  WAS 

COLOR  by  DE  LUXE 

^INemaScoP^ 


with  Robert  Flemyng, 

Josephine  Griffin,  Stephen  Boyd 
Produced  by  ANDRE  HAKIM 
Directed  by  RONALD  NEAME 
Screenplay  by  NIGEL  BALCHIN 
From  the  novel  by  Ewen  Montague 


The  greatest,  most  dangerous 
frontier  of  them  all  . . . just  1 7 miles 
from  your  home— straight  up! 

GUY  MADISON  VIRGINIA  LEITH 
JOHN  HODIAK  DEAN  JAGGER 


ON  THE 
THRESHOLD 
OF  SPACE 

COLOR  by  DE  LUXE 

Cinema! 


Produced  by  WILLIAM  BLOOM 
Directed  by  ROBERT  D.  WEBB 
Screenplay  by  SIMON  WINCELBERG 


"Television  Almanac"  Makes  Initial 
Appearance  as  Service  Annual 


See  Ttnreat 
To  Scree wt 
Copyrigh  ts 

U’ASHIXGTOX : The  Supreme  Court 

Monday  agreed  to  review  a lower  court  deci- 
sion that  the  Motion  Picture  Association 
said  could  seriously  interfere  with  the  ac- 
quisition of  literary  and  musical  copyrights 
for  motion  pictures. 

The  Ninth  Circuit  Court  of  Appeals  ruled 
that  children  were  equally  entitled  with  the 
widow  of  a decreased  copyright  holder  to 
grant  licenses  on  copyrights.  MPAA  and 
other  groups  said  this  upset  time-honored 
practice  and  opened  the  way  for  different 
persons  to  grant  copyrights  to  different 
licensees.  i\IPAA  and  the  other  groups 
want  only  one  person  to  have  the  say  about 
granting  copyright  licenses. 

The  case  to  be  reviewed  by  the  Supreme 
Court  involves  the  question  of  the  ownership 
of  the  song  copyrights  by  the  late  George 
G.  De  Sylva.  His  widow,  Marie  De  Sylva, 
had  renewed  the  copyrights  and  licensed 
them.  A suit  was  brought  by  the  mother 
of  Stephen  W.  Ballentine,  the  admittedly 
illegitimate  child  of  De  Sylva,  for  a share 
in  control  of  the  copyrights.  The  District 
Court  said  only  the  widow  had  a say,  but 
the  Circuit  Court  said  both  widow  and  chil- 
dren had  a share  in  the  proceeds  of  the 
copyrights  and  that  both  were  authorized 
to  grant  licenses  or  other  non-exclusive 
rights. 

MPAA,  the  Song  Writers  Protective  As- 
sociation, ASCAP  and  other  groups  pro- 
tested, claiming  this  would  hopelessly  con- 
fuse the  granting  of  copyright  licenses. 
MP.A.A,  in  its  “friend  of  the  court”  appeal 
to  the  high  court,  pointed  out  that  film  com- 
panies buy  exclusive  rights  to  literary  and 
musical  material,  and  that  unless  they  can 
get  these  exclusive  rights,  the  possibility  of 
the  use  of  the  material  by  competing  media 
would  deter  the  acquisition  and  use  of  the 
works  in  motion  pictures.  “The  availability 
of  exclusive  rights  encourages  and  makes 
possible  the  widest  distribution  of  the  work,” 
MPAA  said. 

In  agreeing  to  review  the  Circuit  Court 
decision,  the  Supreme  Court  said  it  would 
also  accept  the  “friend  of  the  court”  briefs 
from  MPAA  and  the  other  groups. 

In  another  action,  the  Supreme  Court  re- 
fused to  review  decisions  of  the  Second 
Circuit  Court  of  Appeals  on  the  qualifica- 
tions of  a particular  law  firm  to  represent 
two  plaintiffs  in  anti-trust  actions. 

The  lower  court  disqualified  Arnold 
Malkan  and  his  firm  from  acting  as  at- 
torney for  Laskey  Brothers  of  West  Vir- 
ginia, Inc.,  in  one  anti-trust  suit,  but  had 
permitted  Mr.  Malkan  and  his  firm  to  act 
as  plaintiffs  for  the  Austin  theatre  in  a 
second  suit. 

Mr.  Malkan  and  the  Laskey  firm  appealed 
the  first  decision,  and  the  distributors  ap- 
pealed the  second,  but  the  high  court  refused 
to  upset  either  lower  court  verdict. 


The  "International  Television  Almanac," 
published  by  Quigley  Publications,  made 
its  initial  appearance  this  week.  It  is  a 
companion  book  to  the  "International 
Motion  Picture  Almanac."  Television  data, 
until  this  year,  was  part  of  that  book. 
However,  the  rapid  growth  of  the  newer 
industry  and  the  mutual  interest  of  both, 
made  it  necessary  and  expedient  to  put 
television  in  its  own  volume. 

Martin  Quigley,  publisher,  said  in  his 
foreword,  "This  book  is  dedicated — as  its 
annual  successors  will  be — to  the  artistic 
and  commercial  advancement  of  the  tele- 
vision industry." 

Included  in  the  many  hundreds  of  pages 
of  the  "Almanac,"  edited  by  Charles  S. 
Aaronson,  is  the  only  authoritative  "Who’s 
Who"  section  for  the  industry.  Virtually 
every  important  executive,  performer  and 
technician  is  included. 

The  thumb-indexed  sections  into  which 
the  "Almanac"  is  divided  represent  a true 
cross-section  of  all  the  vital  information  in 
the  industry.  In  order,  they  are: 

Pictures — A listing  of  all  feature  film 
releases  from  1944  to  1955  including  stars, 
releasing  company,  running  time;  British 
and  foreign  films  released  in  the  U.  S.  by 
title  and  by  country  of  origin. 

Stations — all  those  in  the  U.  S.  and 
possessions  including  those  in  operation  as 
well  as  those  with  construction  permits; 
channel  allocations. 

Producers  - Distributors  — of  pro- 
grams, commercials,  feature  films  and 
shorts. 

Services — rental  studios  and  produc- 
tion facilities,  cutting  rooms,  film  effects. 


Four  Los  Angeles  Theatres 
To  Be  Built  by  Lippert 

LOS  ANGELES : Four  new  theatres  will  be 
constructed  in  the  Los  Angeles  area,  it  is 
announced  by  Robert  L.  Lippert,  head  of  the 
29-theatre  Robert  L.  Lippert  Circuit,  which 
includes  both  indoor  houses  and  drive-ins 
throughout  California  and  southern  Oregon. 
They  include  a 1,500-seat  house  with  a 250- 
car  parking  lot  in  the  San  Fernando  val- 
ley, a similar  house  in  the  Garden  Grove- 
Buena  Park  area  and  two  other  properties. 


United  Artists  Announces 
Foreign  Ad  Campaign 

The  largest  foreign  advertising-publicity- 
exploitation  program  in  United  Artists’  his- 
tory was  announced  in  Europe  this  week  by 
Max  E.  Youngstein,  vice-president,  who  is 
in  Paris  with  Francis  M.  Winikus,  his 


sound  effects,  music,  costumes,  puppets, 
animation,  commercial  jingles,  merchan- 
disers, market  research,  studio  equipment, 
laboratories,  talent  and  literary  agencies, 
publicity  representatives. 

Progrants — all  network  and  syndicated 
by  star,  producer,  distributor  and  sponsor; 
poll  and  award  winners. 

Advertising  Agencies — a listing  of 
all  agencies  and  station  representatives. 

Companies — networks,  set  manufactur- 
ers, major  producers  and  distributors. 

Organizations  — national  groups,  re- 
gional units,  guilds  and  unions. 

The  Industry  in  Canada — stations, 
station  representatives,  advertising  agen- 
cies, organizations,  producers,  distributors. 

The  Industry  in  Great  Britain — a 
review  of  the  year,  companies,  producers 
and  distributors,  services,  advertising  agen- 
cies, associations,  equipment  manufactur- 
ers, awards. 

The  World  Market — detailed  infor- 
mation on  the  industry  In  many  countries 
throughout  the  world. 

Television  Code — the  complete  text 
of  the  industry's  code  of  standards. 

The  Press — trade  publications;  editors 
and  writers  of  the  newspapers,  fan  maga- 
zines, editors  and  writers  of  general  maga- 
zines, syndicates. 

The  700-page  Television  Almanac  is 
priced  at  $5  per  copy,  and  is  obtainable 
by  post-paid  mail  from  Quigley  Publishing 
Company,  1270  Avenue  of  the  Americas, 
New  York  20,  N.  Y.  Bought  in  combination 
with  the  "Motion  Picture  Almanac"  the 
price  of  both  is  $8.50. 


newly  appointed  executive  assistant.  The 
new  budget  for  promotion  is  said  to  be  25 
per  cent  higher  than  the  biggest  previous 
U.A.  outlay.  Mr.  Youngstein,  with  Mr. 
Winikus,  will  meet  with  the  company’s 
European  distribution  and  promotion  execu- 
tives to  detail  the  merchandising  program, 
as  well  as  to  outline  the  full  production  pro- 
gram for  1956  and  plans  for  1957.  During 
the  three-week  series  of  conferences  in 
Paris,  London,  Rome,  Madrid  and  Stock- 
holm, Mr.  Winikus  will  be  introduced  to  key 
foreign  personnel. 


Hartford  Prices  Rise 

HARTFORD : A rise  in  ticket  prices  is 
the  trend  here,  it  is  reported.  Two  deluxe 
suburban  houses,  the  Central,  West  Hart- 
ford, and  the  Colonial,  Hartford,  have  in- 
creased adult  admission  prices  to  70  cents. 
The  Burnside,  East  Hartford,  has  increased 
adult  admissions  from  65  to  70  cents.  Other 
suburban  operators  are  reported  planning 
comparable  increases. 


16 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14.  1956 


HrGHES  BEYS  BACK  TWO 
FEATEBES  FBOM  BKO 


. . . Producer  pays  $8,000,000/ 
plus  estimated  proceeds  share 
of  ''Jet  Pilot"  and  "Conqueror"; 
20  from  RKO  in  1956. 

Howard  Hughes,  who  last  July  sold  RKO 
Radio  Pictures,  its  film  library,  studios  and 
property,  to  General  Teleradio  for  $25,000,- 
000  in  cash,  last  week  repurchased  from  the 
company  his  two  personally  produced  pic- 
tures. "The  Conqueror”  and  “Jet  Pilot.” 
The  price  was  $8,000,000  cash,  plus  an  esti- 
mated $4,000,000  from  Mr.  Hughes’  share 
of  the  distribution  proceeds. 

The  announcement  of  the  newest  deal  was 
made  at  a press  conference  in  New  York 
last  week  held  by  Thomas  F.  O’Neil,  chair- 
man of  the  board  of  RKO,  and  Daniel  T. 
O’Shea,  president  of  the  company. 

The  Hughes  deal  came  on  the  heels  of  the 
C & C Super  agreement,  by  which  the  latter 
company  paid  RKO  $12,200,000  in  cash,  plus 
$3,000,000  to  be  paid  in  the  next  24  months, 
for  television  rights  to  the  RKO  film  library, 
with  a number  of  exceptions  of  reservations, 
in  addition  to  the  licensing  rights  for  the 
pictures  abroad. 

At  his  press  conference,  Mr.  O’Neil  said 
the  Hughes  deal,  like  the  C & C Super 
agreement,  was  made  in  order  to  get  addi- 
tional working  capital  for  RKO  Radio  Pic- 
tures studio  production.  RKO  will  distribute 
“The  Conqueror”  and  “Jet  Pilot”  throughout 
the  world. 

With  Federal  Communications  Commis- 
sion approval.  General  Teleradio  and  RKO 
Radio  have  been  officially  merged,  with  Mr. 
O’Neil  now  becoming  president  of  the  parent 
company,  RKO  Teleradio  Pictures,  Inc.,  as 
well  as  chairman  of  RKO  Radio  Pictures. 

In  the  course  of  the  press  conference,  Mr. 
O’Shea,  who  sat  beside  Mr.  O’Neil,  took 
the  opportunity  to  announce  that  RKO 
Radio  Pictures  will  invest  $19,000,000  in 
product  this  year — 17  pictures,  half  of  which 
will  be  made  by  the  studio  and  the  remain- 
der by  independents.  He  added  that  the 
company  will  release  about  20  films  in  1956. 

Hughes  Commitment 

Mr.  O’Neil,  questioned  on  the  releasing 
plans  for  “Jet  Pilot,”  said  that  under  a sup- 
plementary agreement  in  the  original  deal 
with  Mr.  Hughes,  which  remains  unchanged, 
Mr.  Hughes  is  committed  to  make  “Jet 
Pilot”  ready  for  distribution  in  June,  1956. 
Mr.  O’Neil  indicated  that  RKO  would  no 
longer  be  committed  to  distribute  the  film 
if  Mr.  Hughes,  who  owns  the  picture,  fails 
to  meet  the  June  commitment. 

The  RKO  board  chairman  estimated  that 
in  the  Hughes  and  C & C deals  $20,000,000 
changed  hands.  The  cash,  he  said,  will  go 


a “great  way”  toward  reducing  the  com- 
pany’s debts  and  afford  working  capital  to 
plow  back  into  motion  picture  production. 

He  disclosed  that  $15,000,000  of  the  cash 
received  in  the  two  transactions  has  been 
applied  in  repayment  of  loans  procured  from 
the  Chase  Manhattan  Bank.  In  this  connec- 
tion it  is  recalled  that  the  bank  loaned  Gen- 
eral Teleradio  $25,000,000  when  the  latter 
company  purchased  RKO  from  Mr.  Hughes. 
He  also  said  that  another  $5,000,000  accru- 
ing from  the  deals  will  go  into  working 
capital  of  RKO,  with  another  $7,000,000 
to  $8,000,000  from  the  reserved  rights  of 
RKO  in  the  C & C Super  deal  for  working 
capital  being  estimated. 

RKO  thus  “is  not  far  from  the  break- 
even point”  in  its  operations  now,  according 
to  Mr.  O’Neil.  He  prefaced  this  remark  by 
saying  that  the  factor  of  amortization  of 
properties  has  a large  effect  in  determining 
profits  of  motion  picture  companies,  a factor, 
he  added,  with  which  he  has  become  more 
familiar  since  General  Teleradio’s  acquisi- 
tion of  RKO. 

I\o  Resistance 

iMr.  O’Shea,  asked  whether  he  had  met 
any  exhibitor  resistance  since  the  sale  of 
the  RKO  film  library,  replied  in  the  nega- 
tive. 

Mr.  O’Neil  in  the  course  of  the  press 
conference  emphasized  once  again  that  he 
and  his  management  group  purchased  RKO 
from  Mr.  Hughes  with  the  sole  intention 
of  operating  the  company  as  a going  con- 
cern. He  said  the  new  Hughes  deal  and 
the  recent  C & C Super  agreement  represent 
moves  which  General  Teleradio,  the  broad- 
casting and  TV  branch  of  the  merged  corn- 
pan}',  had  contemplated  from  the  start.  The 
reason  the  two  deals  were  consummated,  he 
continued,  was  to  “accelerate”  the  cash  re- 
turn inherent  in  the  investment. 

Asked  to  explain  Mr.  Hughes’  motives  in 
re-purchasing  his  “Jet  Pilot”  and  “The 
Conqueror,”  Mr.  O’Neil  said  that  Mr. 
Hughes  had  acted  out  of  sentiment  and  on 
the  commercial  potential  of  the  two  pictures. 

In  connection  with  the  C & C Super  deal, 
Mr.  O’Neil  said  that  pictures  made  after 
August,  1948,  will  not  be  released  to  TV 
until  RKO  works  out  an  agreement  with 
the  Screen  Actors  Guild  and  various  other 
guilds.  August,  1948,  is  the  cut-off  date 
provided  in  the  guilds’  contracts  with  the 
studios — the  guilds  demand  extra  compensa- 
tion for  post-1948  pictures  shown  on  TV. 

Taking  cognizance  of  his  position  as 
president  of  the  parent  company,  Mr.  O’Neil 
denied  that  he  will  actively  operate  RKO 
Radio  Pictures  which,  he  said,  will  be 
operated  as  a separate  unit  of  RKO  Tele- 
radio Pictures. 


Photos  by  the  Herald 


THOMAS  O'NEIL  explains  that  resale  of  pic- 
tures to  Howard  Hughes,  for  $8,000,000  plus 
a further  amount  based  on  the  gross  receipts, 
at  the  conference  in  New  York  last  week. 
At  the  right  rear,  Daniel  O'Shea,  RKO  Radio 
Pictures  president. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


17 


THIS  IS  SHOW 
BUSINESS  HISTORY! 


"BEST  YEARS  OF  OUR  LIVES 


BIGGER 

THAN  BIG! 

How  great  is  great?  Up  to  now  "The 
Best  Years  of  Our  Lives”  has  been 
the  biggest  Samuel  Goldwyn  grosser 
of  all  time  and  one  of  this  industry’s 
all-time  top  record  holders!  "GUYS 
AND  DOLLS”  is  topping  it  in  every 
situation  throughout  the  nation. 


GUYS  AND  DOLLARS  FACTS... 

FIRST  8 STILL  GREAT!  New  York,  Chicago,  Boston,  Philadelphia,  Washington,  Detroit, 
Los  Angeles,  San  Francisco.  Long  runs  continue,  ranging  from  7th  to  10th  weeks. 


ATLANTA  — 800  seat  house  tops  sensational 
"Best  Years”  business. 

ATLANTIC  CITY — Terrific!  Tops  famed  "Best 
Years”  by  $1,000. 

BUFFALO  — 450  seat  house  sets  sensational 
new  record,  even  topping  normal  business 
of  regular  runs. 


CHARLOTTE  — 554  seat  house  tops  business 
of  theatre  that  had  "Best  Years”  premiere. 

CLEVELAND — Doing  5 times  normal  business. 

CINCINNATI  — New  all-time  house  record. 

COLUMBUS — First  2 weeks  in  3,000  seat  house 
beats  famed  "Best  Years”  in  same  theatre. 


{continued) 


t 


DAYTON  - 3 times  normal  business. 

DENVER  — New  all-time  house  record  in 
2,600  seat  theatre. 

DES  MOINES— Record  for  600  seat  house  and 
doing  twice  normal  business  of  regular 
runs. 

HARTFORD  — Off-beat  house  chalking  up 
sensational  grosses  seldom  seen  in  regular 
first- runs. 

INDIANAPOLIS  — Long-run  house  doing  4 
times  business  of  regular  first -runs. 

KANSAS  CITY  — 900  seat  house  tops  big 
grossing  pictures  in  other  theatres. 

MEMPHIS  — Tops  record  business  of  ''Best 
Years”  in  2,700  seat  house. 

MIAMI  BEACH  — 800  seat  house  doing  25 
percent  more  than  previous  record  holder 
"Best  Years.” 

MIAMI  — Playing  simultaneously  and  even 
topping  Miami  Beach  by  10  percent. 

MILWAUKEE— First  2 weeks’  business  in  great 
2,400  seat  house  tops  previous  record 
holder  "Best  Years”  by  25  percent. 


MINNEAPOLIS  — 2,800  seat  theatre  tops 
previous  record  holder  "Best  Years”  by 
10  percent. 

NEW  ORLEANS  — Doing  3 times  normal 
business  in  2,200  seat  theatre. 

NORFOLK  — 600  seat  house  topping  normal 
business  of  regular  first- runs. 

OKLAHOMA  CITY — First  2 weeks  top  "Best 
Years”  record  business. 

OMAHA  — 900  seat  house  doing  3 times 
normal  business  of  regular  first -runs. 

PORTLAND — 1,800  seat  theatre  beats  record 
"Best  Years”  by  $800  in  first  week. 

RALEIGH — 600  seat  off-beat  theatre  tops 
famed  "Best  Years”  by  20  percent. 

ST.  LOUIS— Small  house  doing  3 times  normal 
business  of  regular  first-runs. 

SAN  DIEGO — Topping  record-breaking  "Best 
Years.” 

SEATTLE  — 850  seat  house  doing  3 times 
normal  business  of  big  first-runs. 

WICHITA  — Doing  twice  record  "Best  Years” 
business. 


And  Phenomenal  In  Canada 


CALGARY — Sensational!  Doing  twice  business 
of  famed  "Best  Years.” 

EDMONTON — New  record.  Three  times  nor- 
mal business,  double  "Best  Years”  record. 

HALIFAX-Tops  record  "Best  Years.” 

MONTREAL  — Sets  new  sensational  all-time 
house  record. 

OTTAWA — Sensational!  New  record.  Doing 
3 times  normal  business  of  theatre  with 
1,000  more  seats. 


TORONTO— Sensational,  unheard  of  business ! 
More  than  triple  "Best  Years”  gross. 

VANCOUVER — Fantastic  new  all-time  record. 
First  week  doubles  business  of  record  "Best 
Years”  and  second  week  triples  "Best 
Years”  second  week  business. 

WINNIPEG— Sensational  new  record!  Doing 
more  than  twice  the  business  of  "Best 
Years.” 


THEY’RE  MAKING  BOX-OFFICE  HISTORY!  JOIN! 


SET  BIG  PrSH 
FOR  FOX  FILMS 


. . . Lichtman  outlines  product 
lineup  at  sales  meeting  in 
New  York;  sales  force  hears  of 
merchandising  plans. 

The  product  lineup  for  tlie  year  and  cam- 
paign plans  for  many  of  these  pictures  high- 
lighted the  two-day  national  sales  conference 
of  domc.'tic,  Canadian  and  home  office  sales 
executives  held  last  week  by  20th  Century- 
Fox  at  its  home  office. 

A1  Lichtman,  director  of  distribution,  dis- 
cussed the  $70,000,000  appropriation  an- 
nounced earlier  in  the  week  for  the  produc- 
tion of  34  CinemaScope  pictures.  Of  this 
number,  he  said,  the  company  plans  to  re- 
lease 24  studio-produced  films,  at  the  rate  of 
two  per  month,  during  1956  while  other 
CinemaScope  and  standard  dimension  films 
will  be  acquired  for  release. 

Cites  Strong  Lineup 

The  lineup,  he  said,  is  the  strongest  in  the 
history  of  the  company  and  boasts  two  box 
office  “blockbusters” — Rodgers  & Hammer- 
stein’s  “Carousel”  and  “The  King  and  I,” 
the  first  twm  productions  filmed  in  the  new 
CinemaScope  55  process.  Mr.  Lichtman  also 
reported  that,  as  of  December  17,  there  were 
16,428  theatres  equipped  to  show  Cinema- 
Scope pictures  in  the  U.  S.  and  Canada  and 
of  this  total,  3,646  were  wdth  stereophonic 
sound,  820  with  mixers  and  11,962  optical 
sound. 

\V.  C.  Gehring,  executive  assistant  general 
sales  manager,  gave  the  meeting  the  sched- 
ule for  the  1956  releases,  as  follows: 

January  — “The  Lieutenant  Wore 
Skirts,”  starring  Tom  Ewell  and  Sheree 
North,  and  "The  Bottom  of  the  Bottle,” 
starring  Van  Johnson,  Joseph  Cotten  and 
Ruth  Roman. 

February  — “Carousel,”  with  Gordon 
MacRae,  Shirley  Jones  and  Cameron  Mitch- 
ell, and  “The  Man  Who  Never  Was”  with 
Clifton  Webb  and  Gloria  Grahame. 

March — Darryl  F.  Zanuck’s  personal 
production,  “The  Man  in  the  Gray  Flannel 
Suit”  starring  Gregory  Peck,  Jennifer  Jones 
and  Fredric  March,  and  “On  the  Thres- 
hold of  Space,”  starring  John  Hodiak,  Vir- 
ginia Leith  and  Guy  Madison. 

April — “The  Revolt  of  Mamie  Stover,” 
with  Jane  Russell  and  Richard  Egan, 
and  “23  Paces  to  Baker  Street”  with  Van 
Johnson. 

May  — "The  Proud  Ones,”  starring 
Robert  Ryan,  Virginia  Mayo  and  Robert 
Stock,  and  “The  Sixth  of  June,”  with 
Robert  Taylor,  Richard  Todd  and  Dana 
Wynter. 

June  — "Hilda  Crane,”  starring  Jean 


Simmons  and  Guy  Madison,  and  “Jane 
Eyre”  with  James  Mason. 

July — “The  Day  the  Century  Ended,” 
starring  Robert  Wagner  and  Cameron 
Mitchell,  and  “The  Best  Things  in  Life  Are 
Free.” 

August — “Solo,”  Buddy  Adler  produc- 
tion, and  “Boy  on  a Dolphin.” 

September — “The  King  and  I,”  starring 
Deborah  Kerr,  and  Yul  Brynner,  and  “The 
Last  Wagon,”  a Howard  Hawks  production. 

October — “Bus  Stop,”  a Buddy  Adler 
production,  and  “Anastasia,”  starring  Ingrid 
Bergman. 

November — Darryl  F.  Zanuck’s  produc- 
tion of  “Island  in  the  Sun,”  and  "Heaven 
Knows,  Mr.  Allison,”  starring  Deborah 
Kerr. 

December — “The  Circle”  and  Cole  Por- 
ter’s “Can  Can.” 

Charles  Einfcld,  vice-president  in  charge 
of  advertising,  publicity  and  exploitation, 
and  members  of  his  staff  detailed  campaign 
plans  for  many  of  these  pictures.  “Carousel” 
will  be  given  a large  campaign  surpassing  in 
scope  and  power  that  for  “The  Robe,”  ac- 
cording to  Mr.  Einfeld.  In  addition  to  the 
special  demcmstration  reel  of  CinemaScope 
55,  including  clips  from  the  picture  to  be 
held  in  approximately  60  cities  for  the  press 
and  e.xhibitors,  a national  advertising  cam- 
paign in  the  major  publications  has  been 
set.  He  said  21  national  magazines  and  23 
fan  magazines  have  scheduled  features  and 
pictorial  layouts  on  the  film. 

Big  Men^handising  Set 

The  Easter  attraction,  “The  Man  in  the 
Gray  Flannel  Suit,”  will  have  the  greatest 
merchandising  effort  ever  launched  by  the 
company  on  a picture,  it  was  announced.  In 
addition  to  ticups  with  the  men’s  wear  field, 
special  efforts  are  being  made  through 


THE  CHIEFS,  above.  Promotional  plans  are 
the  subjects  as  Charles  Einfeld,  vice-presi- 
dent, talks  to  the  national  sales  conference. 
With  him  is  William  C.  Gehring,  executive 
assistant  general  sales  manager. 


Left,  the  subject  is  "Fashions,"  especially  hav- 
ing to  do  with  "The  Man  in  the  Gray  Flannel 
Suit."  The  speaker  is  Bert  Bacharach,  style 
commentator.  With  him,  Al  Lichtman,  director 
of  distribution. 


Simon  and  Schuster,  publishers  of  the  book 
from  which  the  film  was  made. 

Mr.  Lichtman  also  announced  four  pro- 
motions and  changes  in  the  domestic  sales 
organization.  Al  Levy  was  promoted  from 
Boston  exchange  manager  to  northeast  di- 
vision manager  with  headquarters  in  Boston. 
Weldon  Waters  succeeds  him.  Robert  L. 
Conn,  Indianapolis  branch  manager,  went 
to  Chicago  to  work  with  Tom  R.  Gilliam, 
branch  head  there,  while  Ray  Schmertz, 
Cleveland  salesman,  succeeded  Mr.  Conn. 


Spyros  Skouras  Presides  at 
20th-Fox  Sales  Convention 

Spyros  P.  Skouras,  president  of  20th  Cen- 
tury-Fox, presided  at  a two-day  Latin  Amer- 
ica sales  convention  January  8-9  for  20th 
Century-Fo.x  international  managers,  in 
Havana,  Cuba,  it  was  announced  by  Murray 
Silverstone,  20th-Fox  international  presi- 
dent. Mr.  Skouras,  Mr.  Silverstone  and 
Edward  D.  Cohen,  Latin  America  super- 
visor, have  returned  to  New  York. 


Theatre  Action  Dismissed 

Alt  action  brought  under  the  anti-trust 
law  by  the  operator  of  the  Fleetwood  thea- 
tre, Bronx,  against  various  distributors  and 
J.  J.  Theatres,  Inc.,  for  recovery  of  some 
$450,000  in  treble  damages  has  been  dis- 
missed with  prejudice.  Judge  Lawrence  E. 
Walsh  signed  the  order  in  the  U.S.  District 
Court  of  New  York. 


20 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14,  1956 


TOA  SAYS: 


Film  Sale 
To  TV  Ms 
"“M  larming 


Ed  Sullivan  Show  and  Phil  Silvers 
Top  Winners  in  Fame  Television  Poll 

Ed  Sullivan  with  his  ever-continuing  The  Ed  Sullivan  Show  this  week 
was  revealed  as  the  Champion  of  Champions  for  the  second  consecutive 
year  in  the  seventh  annual  television  poll  conducted  for  Fame  by  Tele- 
vision Today.  The  Sullivan  Show  was  named  Best  Network  Program  for 
the  year.  Keeping  pace  and  sharing  honors  with  Mr.  Sullivan,  is  a com- 
parative television  newcomer,  Phil  Silvers,  who,  as  star  of  You’ll  Never 
Get  Rich,  was  named  Champion  of  Champions  as  Best  Television  Per- 
former of  1955. 

The  Fame  poll,  which  tunes  in  on  the  opinions  of  hundreds  of  tele- 
vision editors,  writers  and  critics  throughout  the  country,  covers  every 
phase  of  television  programming.  Winners  in  27  other  categories  are 
as  follows ; 

Most  Promising  New  Male  Star,  Johnny  Carson;  Most  Promising  New- 
Female  Star,  Jeannie  Carson;  Show  Making  Most  Effective  Use  of  Color, 
Max  Liebman  Presents;  Best  Comedian,  George  Gobel;  Best  Comedienne, 
Lucille  Ball;  Best  Comedy  Team,  George  Burns  & Grade  Allen;  Best 
Comedy  Show,  You’U  Never  Get  Rich;  Best  Variety  Program,  The  Ed 
Sullivan  Show;  Best  Panel  Discussion  Program,  Meet  The  Press;  Best 
New  Dramatic  Program  (introduced  this  season).  Playwrights  ’56;  Most 
Unique  New  Program  (other  than  drama),  Wide  Wide  World;  Best 
Dramatic  Program,  Studio  One. 

Also,  Best  Mystery  Program,  Alfred  Hitchcock  Presents;  Best  Vocalist 
(male).  Perry  Como;  Best  Vocalist  (female),  Dinah  Shore;  Best  Classi- 
cal Music  Show,  Voice  of  Firestone;  Best  Popular  Music  Show,  Your  Hit 
Parade;  Best  Country  Music  Show,  Grand  Ole  Opry;  Best  Syndicated  Film 
Series,  I Led  Three  Lives;  Best  Quiz  Show  (audience  participation).  The 
$64,000  Question;  Best  Quiz  Show  (panel).  What’s  My  Line? 

Also,  Best  Master  of  Ceremonies,  Garry  Moore;  Best  Announcer, 
George  Fenneman;  Best  News  Commentator,  John  Cameron  Swayze;  Best 
Sportscaster,  Mel  Allen;  Best  Daytime  Program,  NBC  Matinee  Tlieatre; 
Best  Children’s  Program,  Disneyland. 


The  Tlieatre  Owners  of  America  this 
week  issued  a “statement  of  alarm”  at  the 
recent  sales  of  theatrical  films  to  television, 
laid  preliminary  plans  for  the  February 
hearings  of  the  Senate  Small  Business  Com- 
mittee, decided  to  poll  their  members  on 
Government  regulation  of  trade  practices 
and  related  matters,  and  decided  against  in- 
stalling a full  time  executive  director  at 
this  time. 

Leaders  of  the  organization  concluded  a 
three-day  meeting,  then  held  a press  con- 
ference at  which  Myron  Blank,  president, 
and  Pat  McGee,  vice-president,  outlined  the 
conclusions  they  had  reached. 

The  statement  on  sales  to  television,  ap- 
proved by  the  officers,  read ; 

“We  are  gravely  concerned  by  the  knowl- 
edge that  Columbia  and  RKO  have  sold  pic- 
tures to  television  which  were  made  ex- 
pressly for  motion  picture  theatres.  The 
move  must  harm  the  box  office  today.  We 
realize  that  the  distributors  are  within  their 
rights  but  we  feel  it  represents  poor  eco- 
nomic judgment. 

Says  Theatres  Will  Close 

“The  effect  of  these  moves  and  others 
pending  that  we  have  heard  about,  must  and 
will  shrink  the  potential  return  on  pictures 
today  and  in  the  future.  This  action  has 
caused  great  concern  among  all  exhibitors. 
Some  theatres  will  be  forced  to  close  due  to 
the  greed  of  some  distributors  to  pick  up  a 
‘fast  buck.’ 

“We  feel  certain  that  companies  which 
have  concern  for  their  customers  will  refrain 
from  selling  to  television  during  these  trying 
times.” 

Mr.  Blank  gave  reporters  copies  of  a ques- 
tionnaire which  TOA  is  mailing  to  3,600 
exhibitors  in  order  to  formulate  the  organ- 
ization’s testimony  at  the  Senate  hearings 
scheduled  for  February  2 at  which  Allied 
States  Association  has  announced  it  will  seek 
Federal  regulation  of  trade  practices.  The 
questionnaire  covers  the  entire  field  of  trade 
practices,  including  views  on  general  or 
limited  Federal  regulation;  shortage  of  prod- 
uct and  its  importance ; production  by 
former  circuit  affiliates;  arbitration;  high 
rentals  and  forcing  of  pictures;  advanced 
admission  prices  and  who  brings  them 
about;  clearance  and  availability;  competi- 
tive bidding ; the  decrees  and  divorcement ; 
circuit  expansion;  and  the  charge  that  high 
rentals  have  “confiscated”  the  benefits  of  the 
admission  tax  reduction. 

Mr.  Blank  indicated  that  the  leaders  of 
TOA  themselves  are  opposed  to  Govern- 
ment regulation.  “The  trouble  so  far  has 
been  too  much  Government  regulation,”  Mr. 
Blank  said.  But  they  said  the  organization’s 


testimony  at  the  hearings  would  be  based 
on  the  results  of  the  questionnaire. 

Albert  Forman,  president  of  the  Oregon 
Theatre  Owners ; George  Kerasotes  of 
Springfield,  111. ; and  Dick  Kennedy,  presi- 
dent of  the  Alabama  Theatre  Owners,  will 
represent  TOA  at  the  hearings. 

Questioned  on  COMPO’s  tax  repeal  cam- 
paign, Mr.  McGee  said  preliminary  talks 
have  been  held.  Asked  about  the  advisability 
of  the  campaign  now,  he  said  “There  never 
is  a good  time  for  a tax  campaign.  When 
you’re  sick,  you  take  medicine.” 

The  hour-long  press  conference  covered 
a variety  o^  other  su’^jects.  Un  Mr.  Rank’s 
campaign  to  sell  pictures  in  America,  Mr. 
Blank  said,  “When  he  is  giving  away  his 
merchandise  (to  TV),  he’s  going  to  have 
a hard  time  selling  it.  Someone  should  ex- 
plain to  him  the  difference  between  a good 
picture  and  one  that’s  saleable  at  the  Ameri- 
can box  office.”  On  Allied,  “I  don’t  care 
what  tire  label  is.  Anything  that  is  con- 
structive, TOA  will  be  glad  to  share  in.” 

The  TOA  international  convention  at  the 
New  York  Coliseum  September  25  will  be 
“truly  international,”  Mr.  Blank  said. 


Emergency  Defense  Unit 
Named  in  Ohio 

A four-member  emergency  defense  com- 
mittee for  Ohio  exhibitors  has  been  ap- 
pointed by  Horace  Adams,  president  of  the 
Independent  Theatre  Owners  of  Ohio,  it  is 
reported  from  Columbus,  where  a meeting 
of  the  association’s  board  of  directors  was 
held.  Exhibitors  are  invited  to  report  griev- 
ances about  sales  policies  to  committee  mem- 
bers, who  include:  Leo  Jones,  Star  theatre. 
Upper  Sandusky;  Louis  Wiethe,  Cincinnati; 
C.  S.  Velas,  Capitol  theatre,  Bellaire,  and 
Robert  Wile,  association  secretary. 


Name  Lange  to  Post 

Harry  W.  Lange  has  been  named  execu- 
tive vice-president  and  general  manager  of 
the  Chicago  studio  operations  of  Kling  Film 
Enterprises,  it  is  announced  by  Robert  Eirin- 
berg,  president.  Mr.  Lange  joins  Kling 
studios  after  23  years  with  Sarra,  Inc.,  Chi- 
cago. He  has  produced  motion  pictures 
and  slide  films  in  all  -18  states. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14.  1956 


21 


NATIONAL‘MAGAZINE 
AND  WEEK-END 
NEWSPAPERS  with  a 

combined  circulation 


30  National  Magazines  Blanketing, { 
190  Weekend  Newspapers  coveringij 

That's  the  tremendous  total  of  all  paid|j, 
the  greatest  National  Pre-selling  Adr 


he  nation! 

1183  Individual  Cities! 

dvertising  space... 


Weekend  Newspapers 
in  these  183  cities: 


THIS  WEEK 


Baltimore  Sun 
Birmingham  News 
Boston  Herald 
Charlotte  Observer 
Chicago  Daily  News 
Cincinnati  Enquirer 
Cleveland  Plain  Dealer 
Dallas  News 
Des  Moines  Register 
Detroit  News 
Houston  Post 
Indianapolis  Star 
(Jacksonville)  Florida 
TimesUnion 
Los  Angeles  Times 
Memphis  Commercial  Appeal 
Miami  News 
Milwaukee  Journal 
Minneapolis  Tribune 
New  Orleans  Times  Picayune 
New  York  Herald  Tribune 
Norfolk  Virginian-Pilot 
and  Portsmouth  Star 
Philadelphia  Bulletin 
Phoenix  (Arizona)  Republic 
Pittsburgh  Press 
Portland  Oregon  Journal 
Providence  Journal 
Richmond  Times-Dispatch 
Rochester  Democrat 
& Chronicle 

St.  Louis  Globe-Democrat 
Salt  Lake  Tribune 
San  Antonio  Express 
San  Francisco  Chronicle 
Spokane  Spokesman-Review 
Washington  Star 
Wichita  Eagle 


PARADE 


Akron  Beacon  Journal 
Albuquerque  Journal 
Allentown  Call-Chronicle 
Augusta  Chronicle 
Baton  Rouge  (La.)  Advocate 
Beaumont  Enterprise 
Boston  Post 
Bridgeport  Post 
Charleston  (W.Va.)  Mail 
Chicago  Sun-Times 
Columbus  (Ga.) 

Ledger-Enquirer 
Columbus  (Ohio)  Citizen 
Denver  Rocky  Mountain  News 
Detroit  Free  Press 
El  Paso  Times 
Erie  Dispatch 
Evansville  Courier  & Press 
Fort  Wayne  Journal-Gazette 
ForL  Worth  Star-Telegram 
Greenville  (S.C.)  News 
Harrisburg  Patriot-News 
Hartford  Courant 
Indianapolis  Times 
Jackson  (Miss.) 

Clarion-Ledger  Daily  News 
Knoxville  News  Sentinel 
Little  Rock  Arkansas  Gazette 
Long  Beach  (Calif.) 

Independent- 

Press-Telegram 
Long  Island  Press 
Macon  Telegraph  & News 
Madison  Wisconsin 

State  Journal 
Newport  News-Hampton- 

Warwick  Daily  Press 
Newark  Star-Ledger 
New  Bedford  Standard-Times 
Oakland  Tribune 
Pasadena  Star-News 
Peoria  Journal-Star 
Portland  (Me.)  Telegram 
Roanoke  (Va.)  Times 
St.  Louis  Post-Dispatch 
St.  Petersburg  Times 
San  Diego  Union 
Scranton  Scrantonian 


Sioux  Falls  (S.D.) 
Argus-Leader 

Syracuse  Herald-American 
Tucson  Star 
Washington  Post 
and  Times-Herald 
Wheeling  News-Register 
Youngstown  Vindicator 
San  Bernardino  Sun-Telegram 


FAMILY  WEEKLY 


ALABAMA: 

Anniston  Star 
Dothan  Eagle 
Florence  Times 
and  Tri-Cities  Daily 
Huntsville  Times 
Tuscaloosa  News 

ARKANSAS: 

El  Dorado  News 

Hot  Springs  Sentinel  Record 

CALIFORNIA: 

Sacramento  Union 
Santa  Barbara  News  Press 
Monterey  Peninsula  )lerald 

COLORADO: 

Colorado  Springs  Free  Press 
Grand  Junction  Sentinel 
Pueblo  Star  Journal 
& Chieftan 

CONNECTICUT: 

New  Haven  Register 

FLORIDA: 

Daytona  Beach  News  Journal 
Fort  Myers  News-Press 
Gainsville  Sun 
Sarasota  Herald-Tribune 
Tallahassee  Democrat 
Tampa  Times 

West  Palm  Beach  Post-Times 


GEORGIA: 

Albany  Herald 
Rome  News  Tribune 

IDAHO; 

Boise  Statesman 
Idaho  Falls  Post  Register 
Pocatello  State  Journal 

ILLINOIS; 

Bloomington  Daily 
Pantagraph 

Champaign-Urbana  News 
Gazette 

Danville  Commercial  News 
La  Salle  News-Tribune 
Quincy  Herald-Whig 
Springfield  State  Journal 
& Register 

INDIANA: 

Marion  Chronicle-Tribune 
New  Albany  Ledger  & Tribune 

IOWA: 

Council  Bluffs  Nonpareil 
Davenport  Democrat  & Times 
Dubuque  Telegraph-Herald 
Waterloo  Courier 

KENTUCKY; 

Bowling  Green 
Park  City  News 
Paducah  Sun-Democrat 

LOUISIANA: 

Bogalusa  News 

MASSACHUSHTS: 

Lowell  Sun 

MICHIGAN: 

Grand  Rapids  Herald 

MINNESOTA: 

Albert  Lea  Tribune 


MISSISSIPPI: 

Greenville  Delta 
Democrat-Times 
Tupelo  Journal 
Vicksburg  Post-Herald 

MISSOURI: 

Jefferson  City  Capital 
News  Post-Tribune 

NEVADA: 

Las  Vegas  Review  Journal 
Reno  State  Journal 

NEW  JERSEY; 

Asbury  Park  Press 
New  Brunswick  Times 
Trenton  Times-Adver. 

NEW  MEXICO: 

Santa  Fe  New  Mexican 

NEW  YORK: 

Binghamton  Press 
Elmira  Sunday  Telegram 
Utica  Observer-Dispatch 

NORTH  CAROLINA: 

Concord  Tribune 
Salisbury  Post 

NORTH  DAKOTA: 

Fargo  Forum 

OHIO; 

Athens  Messenger 
Canton  Repository 
Coshocton  Tribune 
Lima  News 

Zanesville  Times-Signal 
OKLAHOMA: 

Duncan  Banner 
PENNSYLVANIA; 

Lancaster  Sunday  News 
SOUTH  CAROLINA: 

Florence  News 
SOUTH  DAKOTA: 

Huron  Huronite 
& Daily  Plainsman 
Rapid  City  Journal 
TENNESSEE; 

Kingsport  Times-News 
TEXAS: 

Abilene  Reporter-News 
Austin  American-Statesman 
Big  Spring  Herald 
Denison  Herald 
Denton  Rkord-Chronicle 
Galveston  News 
Greenville  Herald 
Kilgore  News  Herald 
Lufkin  News 

Marshall  News-Messenger 
Midland  Reporter-Telegram 
Paris  News 
Port  Arthur  News 
San  Angelo  Standard-Times 
Snyder  News 
Texarkana  Gazette 
Tyler  Courier- 
Times-Telegraph 
Victoria  Advocate 
Waco  Tribune-Herald 
UTAH: 

Ogden  Standard  Examiner 
Provo  Herald 
VIRGINIA: 

Danville  Register 
Lynchburg  News 

WASHINGTON; 

Pasco-Kennewick-Richland 
Tri-City  Herald 
Wenatchee  World 
WEST  VIRGINIA: 

Beckley  Raleigh  Register 
WISCONSIN; 

Racine  Journal-Times-Bulletin 

WYOMING: 

Casper  Tribune-Herald 
and  Star 

Cheyenne  State  Tribune 
& State  Leader 


COLOR  BY- 


TECHNICOLOR 


..'ampaign  ever...  for  any  Universal  Picture ! 

1 


FIXXS  HONORING 
BRITISH  FILMS 


. . . Special  week  planned  by 
Finnish  distributors,  starting 
January  13;  British  Embassy 
sets  reception  in  Helsinki. 

by  PETER  BURNUP 

LOADOA  ; British  films  currently  are  being 
honoured  by  Finland  at  a special  “British 
Film  \\  eek”  in  Helsinki,  similar  to  last 
Summer’s  British  expedition  to  the  Venice 
Film  Festival.  The  film  “week”  was  or- 
ganised on  the  initiative  of  Finnish  film  dis- 
tributors and  started  January  13,  with  a gala 
performance  at  the  Kino  Palatsi. 

A number  of  British  stars  and  industry 
executives  have  been  invited  to  attend  the 
“week”  and  a full  programme  of  entertain- 
ments and  personal  appearances  has  been 
arranged  by  the  Finnish  hosts.  The  British 
Embassy  is  holding  a reception  to  mark  the 
occasion. 

Leading  the  contingent  from  Britain  is 
John  Davis,  president  of  the  British  Film 
Producers’  Association,  and  Robert  Clark, 
executive  producer  of  Associated  British 
Picture  Corporation. 

Eight  selected  British  films  will  be 
shown  during  the  “week”  and  cinema-goers 
throughout  Finland  will  later  have  the  op- 
portunity of  seeing  these  and  other  British 
films.  The  elaborate  itinerary  calls  for  visits 
in  the  following  few  days  to  Stockholm, 
Oslo  and  Copenhagen  where  special  per- 
formances of  British  films  with  personal 
appearances  of  the  stars  in  them  have  been 
arranged. 

These  safaris  abroad  are  accepted  here  as 
part  of  the  pattern  of  militant  selling  ini- 
tiated by  John  Davis. 

The  now  famous  page  advertisement  taken 
in  behalf  of  the  Rank  Organisation  in  the 
New  York  Times,  though  it  provoked  no 
surprise,  excited  much  comment  this  side. 
Mr.  Davis,  it  is  pointed  out,  flew  to  the 
ends  of  the  world  while  World  War  II  was 
still  in  progress  establishing  the  outposts  of 
the  Rank  Empire.  That  circumnavigatory 
enterprise  has  since  paid  rich  dividends. 
From  Hong  Kong  to  Holland,  from  Mel- 
bourne, Australia,  to  Montreal,  Canada,  films 
like  “Doctor  at  Sea”  are  making  theatre 
records. 

America  Is  “Challenge^’ 

The  last  issued  report  of  the  Rank  Or- 
ganisation revealed  greater-than-ever  re- 
ceipts from  overseas.  But  there  remains  as 
a challenge  to  John  Davis  what  many  here 
refer  to  as  the  .American  Bland  Barrier. 
Mr.  Davis  clearly  is  in  the  mood  to  accept 
the  challenge. 


Consideration  was  given  at  this  week’s 
meeting  of  BFPA’s  Council  to  the  report 
of  T.  O.  A.’s  recent  canvass  of  its  members 
on  the  prospects  of  British  screenings  in 
the  U.  S. 

The  Council’s  subsequent  report  to  the 
press  contented  itself  with  the  discreet  state- 
ment: “Proposals  for  stimulating  and  ex- 
tending the  interests  of  cinema-goers  in  the 
U.  S.  in  British  films  were  discussed.”  Nor 
would  the  association’s  Sir  Henry  French 
in  his  subsequent  questioning  by  newsmen 
go  further  than  to  say  that  his  Council’s 
view  is  that  the  best  means  of  putting  British 
films  over  in  the  American  market  is  by  in- 
direct means  rather  than  direct. 

Restless,  imaginative  John  Davis  is  no- 
toriously no  believer  in  the  orthodox.  He 
is  also  no  acceptor  of  the  condition  of  stale- 
mate. If  a campaign  designed  on  the  method 
of  direct  assault  fails,  then  unorthodox  John 
Davis  will  be  the  first  to  resort  to  the  Roman 
doctrine  of  Fabian  infiltration.  That  page 
in  the  ATw  York  Times  may  be  accepted 
as  the  first  indication  thereof. 

V ‘ 

At  its  latest  meeting,  the  Council  of  the 
British  Film  Producers’  Association  was 
informed  that  American  film  companies  in 
Japan  had  obtained  from  the  Japanese  Gov- 
ernment permission  to  remit  in  the  form  of 
sterling  the  equivalent  of  one  and  a half 
million  dollars  in  addition  to  their  regular 
remittances. 

The  Board  of  Trade,  it  was  stated,  had 
confirmed  this  information  and  questions 
had  been  put  to  them  by  the  association 
about  the  possible  effect  of  this  arrange- 
ment on  the  availability  of  sterling  in  Japan 
for  the  remittance  of  film  earnings  by  the 
British  Commonwealth  Film  Corporation. 

Subsequently,  Sir  Henry  French,  the  as- 
sociation’s director-general,  said  to  news- 
men : “We  are  very  disturbed  about  this. 
Our  point  is  that  this  shifting  of  sterling 
to  Britain  in  behalf  of  the  Americans  will 
not  leave  enough  for  us. 

“We  were  already  told  a short  time  ago 
that  there  was  not  sufficient  sterling  in  Japan 
for  full  British  remittances  to  be  made  al- 
though British  monies  blocked  in  Japan  had 
now  been  unfrozen.” 

V 

Addressing  the  compan)'’s  key  executives 
and  sales  representatives  at  a New  Year 
meeting  here,  Robert  S.  Wolff,  RKO 
Radio’s  London  chairman  and  managing 
director,  claimed  that  1956  was  set  to  wit- 
ness a “mighty  revival”  of  RKO’s  fortunes. 
“We  can  offer  facts  and  figures  to  prove 
that  our  company  in  engaged  on  the  biggest 
reactivation  policy  not  only  in  RKO’s  but 
the  entire  film  industry,”  Mr.  Wolff  de- 
clared. 


Preliminary  figures  of  Granada  Theatres, 
Ltd.,  to  September  30,  1955,  show  an  in- 
creased profit  for  the  \^ear.  The  trading 
profit  of  the  group  is  shown  at  £401,043 
against  £372,274  in  the  previous  year,  with 
a net  profit  after  taxation  and  all  other 
charges  of  £90,628  against  £84,786. 

V 

Immediately  following  the  announcement 
of  his  honour  of  knighthood,  Tom  O’Brien, 
M.P.,  issued  a statement  which  said  in  part: 

“Our  leading  actors,  actresses,  musicians, 
playwrights,  film  producers  and  executives 
are  frequently  and  rightly  the  recipients  of 
Royal  favours,  but  it  is  the  first  time  that 
the  trade  union  side  of  the  industry  and 
those  who  do  not  share  the  limelight  of  the 
stars  and  whose  work  is  less  glamorous  and 
unseen  are,  through  my  honour,  being  graci- 
ously recognised. 

“I  am  very  proud  of  this  indeed.” 

V 

John  Davis,  on  behalf  of  the  Rank  Organ- 
isation, has  announced  that  an  X certificate 
picture,  “The  Man  with  the  Golden  Arm,” 
has  been  booked  to  the  Odeon  circuit. 

In  the  announcement,  the  organisation 
says : “It  has  been  the  policy  of  the  Rank 
Organisation  not  to  play  on  its  circuits 
pictures  given  an  X certificate.  The  reason 
for  this  decision  was  that  the  X certificate 
has  been  commonly  associated  in  the  public 
mind  either  with  horror  or  with  pictures 
depicting  sex,  and  which  the  Rank  Organisa- 
tion considered  generally  unsuitable  to  the 
family  trade  upon  which  so  many  of  its 
theatres  rely. 

“Neveretheless,  the  X certificate  was 
originated  on  a much  broader  plane  and 
was  intended  to  cover  all  types  of  film  en- 
tertainment considered  suitable  for  adult 
audiences. 

“Otto  Preminger’s  ‘Man  with  the  Golden 
Arm,’  a United  Artists  release,  and  dealing 
with  narcotic  addiction,  has  been  granted  an 
X certificate  and  has  been  offered  to  the 
Odeon  circuit. 

“In  Mr.  John  Davis’s  view  it  is  a subject 
which  the  public  has  ever}’  right  to  see  and 
which  does  not  infringe  the  principles  which 
have  governed  the  Rank  Organisation  ap- 
roach.  Accordingly  this  picture  will  open 
at  the  Odeon,  Leicester  Square,  on  the  12th 
January  and  is  scheduled  for  general  release 
on  the  27th  February. 

“Mr.  Davis  makes  this  announcement  to 
avoid  any  misunderstanding  of  the  position. 
Similar  consideration  will  naturally  apply 
for  the  future.” 


Art  Theatre  Opened 

The  800-seat  Gem  theatre  at  Far  Rocka- 
way.  Long  Island,  N.  Y.  has  been  reopened 
as  an  art  house  under  the  name  of  the  Pi.x 
theatre,  it  is  announced  by  the  office  of  Berk 
and  Krumgold,  theatrical  real  estate  brokers. 
A corporation  headed  by  circuit  operator 
Morris  Goldman,  in  conjunction  with  Gil- 
bert Josephson,  pioneer  art  theatre  operator, 
is  the  lessee.  The  lessor  is  Rock  Beach,  In- 
corporated, Charles  F.  Haring,  president. 


24 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


THAT  MAGNIFICENT  OBSESSION  TEAM  IS  DELIVERING 

ANOTHER  MAGNIFICENT 
BOX  OFFICE  SUCCESS! 


PROVIDENCE,  CHARLOTTE,  JACKSONVILLE,  NEW  ORLEANS, 
ATLANTA,  MIAMI,  SAN  FRANCISCO,  SPRINGFIELD,  ILL,  ASHEVILLE,  N.C., 
MONROE,  LA.,  ENID,  OKLA.,  FALL  RIVER,  MASS.,  RALEIGH,  N.C.,  TAMPA,  FLA. 


with  AGNES  MOOREHEAD  • CONRAD  NAGEL  • VIRGINIA  GREY  • GLORIA  TALBOTT 
Directed  by  DOUGLAS  SIRK*  Screenplay  by  PEG  FENWICK*  Produced  by  ROSS  HUNTER 


One  Release 
Deal  Reiter^ 
Says  I^adii 

by  SAMUEL  D.  BERNS 

HOLLYWOOD : Active  independent  pro- 
ducers, as  well  as  stars  who  enjoy  “par- 
ticipation deals,”  would  be  wise  to  consider 
affiliations  with  only  one  major  releasing 
organization,  in  order  to  avoid  possible 
conflict  of  release  date,  as  well  as  opposition 
to  their  own  interest,  it  was  suggested  by 
Alan  Ladd,  head  of  Jaguar  Productions,  in 
an  interview  regarding  his  company’s  future 
plans.  This  bit  of  advice  was  offered  as  a 
precautionary  measure  for  the  current  trend 
which  offers  stars  and  independent  producers 
multiple  opportunities  for  one  or  two-picture 
deals  with  several  distributing  companies. 

Discussing  his  company’s  program  be- 
tween takes  on  Warner’s  unusual  jungle  set 
for  “Santiago,”  the  star  reported  “Hell  on 
Frisco  Bay,”  the  second  production  under 
the  Jaguar  banner,  would  go  into  immediate 
release  this  month,  while  the  third,  “A  Cry 
in  the  Night,”  in  which  he  does  not  appear, 
but  stars  Edmond  O’Brien,  Brian  Donlevy 
and  Natalie  Wood,  is  set  for  early  Fall. 

“Hell  on  Frisco  Bay,”  whose  title  was 
changed  from  “The  Darkest  Hour,”  has  a 
San  Francisco  waterfront  background,  and 
co-stars  Edward  G.  Robinson. 

“Santiago,”  a Warner  production,  in 
which  the  star’s  deal  calls  for  10  per  cent  of 
the  gross,  is  a story  of  Cuba’s  fight  for  in- 
dependence during  the  period  preceding  the 
Spanish-American  War.  Warners  con- 
structed a permanent  five-acre  jungle  set  on 
its  “back  back  lot”  for  this  one,  which  has 
been  engineered  to  provide  jungles,  swamps 
or  everglades,  without  having  to  go  out  on 
expensive  location  jaunts. 

Three  Stories  Bought 

Mr.  Ladd  disclosed  the  purchase  of  three 
story  properties  for  Jaguar  which  are  being 
prepared  for  production.  Two  of  these  are 
Westerns:  “Buffalo  Grass,”  by  Frank  Gru- 
ber, and  “Guns  of  the  Timberland,”  by 
Louis  L’ Amour.  The  third,  “The  Deep  Six,” 
is  a story  of  the  Navy  in  World  War  II, 
with  a setting  in  Alaska. 

Jaguar  Productions,  controlled  by  Mr. 
Ladd  and  George  Bertholon,  his  co-producer 
and  production  manager,  who  worked  with 
the  star  at  Paramount  for  17  years,  is  also 
championing  the  cause  for  “new  faces.”  Mr. 
Ladd  pointed  to  the  company’s  first  film, 
“Drumbeat,”  which  gave  impetus  to  per- 
formers like  Marissa  Pavan,  Audrey  Dalton 
and  Charles  Bronson.  “A  Cry  in  the  Night” 
will  step  Natalie  Wood’s  position  up  a notch, 
and  will  also  launch  Richard  Anderson. 
“Santiago,”  which  gives  writer  Martin 
Rackin  his  first  producer  credit,  will  also 
prove  a career  builder  for  Italian  import 
Rosanna  Podesta  as  well,  he  said. 

Mr.  Ladd  attributed  a great  deal  of  the 


JOINS  HERALD  STAFF 

Lawrence  J.  Quirk  has  joined  The 
HERALD  editorial  staff.  He  was  formerly 
Boston  feature  writer  for  "Films  in  Review." 

He  is  a graduate  of 
Suffolk  University, 
Boston,  and  did 
graduate  work  at 
Boston  University. 

A native  of  Lynn, 
Massachusetts,  he  is 
the  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  ' Andrew  L. 
Quirk  of  that  city 
and  a nephew  of  the 
late  James  R.  Quirk, 
editor  of  Photoplay 
Magazine  prior  to 
his  death  in  1932. 
Mr.  Quirk  began 
his  journalistic  career  in  1946  with  the  Bos- 
ton "Record-American,"  and  has  worked 
for  the  Lynn,  Massachusetts  "Item,"  the 
New  York  "World-Telegram  & Sun"  and 
various  magazines.  More  recently  he  has 
been  an  associate  editor  at  Hotel  & Res- 
taurant News  in  Boston.  An  Army  veteran 
in  the  Korean  War,  he  was  an  instructor  in 
military  journalism  at  the  Armed  Forces  In- 
formation School,  Fort  Slocum,  N.  Y.  and 
contributed  to  Army  publications. 


problem  for  giving  new  faces  an  opportun- 
ity, outside  of  the  television  orbit,  to  the 
jump  in  cost  for  minor  parts  from  $18  per 
day  to  current  minimums  of  $70  for  utter- 
ing a simple  phrase.  This  increased  cost 
now  results  in  a trimming  of  casts  in  the 
early  stages  of  the  screenplay,  or  during  the 
pre-production  budget  analysis,  the  star  said. 

Mr.  Ladd  said  that  he  plans  to  produce 
two  Jaguar  films  a year  for  Warners,  star- 
ring in  at  least  one  of  these,  and  appear 
additionally  under  a one  picture-a-year  com- 
mitment for  the  same  studio.  His  only  re- 
maining outside  contractual  commitment  is 
one  for  Paramount. 


Maryland  Unit  Fights 
Tax  on  Film  Rentals 

BALTIMORE : The  Allied  Motion  Picture 
Theatre  Owners  of  Maryland,  Inc.,  is  cam- 
paigning currently  for  exemption  of  the  two 
per  cent  film  rental  tax  instituted  last  year 
by  the  Maryland  state  legislature.  The 
measure  was  included  in  a bill  intended  for 
merchandise  having  no  relation  to  the  mo- 
tion picture  industry  and  referred  to  rental 
.services.  Jack  L.  Whittle,  chairman  of  the 
legislative  committee  of  the  Allied  group, 
wlio  was  granted  a recent  hearing  before 
one  of  the  state  committees  for  the  purpose 
of  presenting  objections  to  the  tax,  brought 
out  at  that  time  that  an  amendment  to  a 
similar  law  enacted  in  North  Carolina  ex- 
empted motion  picture  film  under  certain 
conditions.  The  result  has  been  deferred 
pending  a February  meeting  of  committees. 


Lawrence  J.  Quirk 


^'MGM  Week"  Promoters 
Girding  for  Action 

Eight  of  the  38  MGM  branches  in  the 
United  States  and  Canada  have  already  re- 
ported booking  an  MGM  subject  in  all  thea- 
tres in  their  territories  for  the  week  of 
February  5-12,  designated  “MGM  Week.” 
Other  branches  have  reported  from  80  to  99 
per  cent  of  all  theatres  in  their  respective 
areas  signed  up  for  at  least  a short  subject, 
newsreel  or  feature  attraction  during  that 
week.  Foreign  MGM  offices  are  coop>erating 
around  the  globe,  it  is  reported.  During 
the  week  set  aside  as  International  Confer- 
ence Week,  more  than  100  international  and 
home  office  representatives  will  attend  a 
meeting  at  the  Culver  City  studio.  Presiding 
will  be  Arthur  M.  Loew,  president  of 
Loew’s,  Inc.,  and  Loew’s  International. 


"Helen  of  Troy"  Premiere 
In  New  York  January  25- 

The  New  York  premiere  of  Warners’ 
“Helen  of  Troy,”  in  CinemaScope  and 
Warnercolor,  will  take  place  January  25  at 
the  Criterion  theatre  in  honor  of  the  Over- 
seas Press  Club  of  America,  it  is  announced 
by  the  company.  Overseas  members  of  the 
club  will  attend  their  local  premieres  of  the 
film,  which  are  taking  place  simultaneously 
in  126  cities  and  in  over  50  countries  around 
the  world.  The  picture  stars  Rosanna  Pod- 
esta and  Jack  Sernas  and  has  an  interna- 
tional cast.  The  story  is  based  on  Homer’s 
“Iliad.”  Robert  Wise  directed  in  Italy. 


Loew's  Theatres  Drive-in 
Bid  Decision  Appealed 

An  appeal  was  filed  January  5 against  the 
decision  granting  Loew’s  Theatres  permis- 
sion to  own  and  operate  a drive-in  in  Rari- 
tan, N.  J.  Filing  was  the  attorney  represent- 
ing Wilber  Snaper,  former  Allied  States 
president,  who  contested  the  original  Loew’s 
petition.  Mr.  Snaper’s  attorney,  Monroe 
Stein,  filed  the  appeal,  which  takes  excep- 
tion to  Judge  Sidney  Sugarman’s  ruling 
denying  Mr.  Snaper,  who  owns  a nearby 
theatre,  the  right  to  enter  the  court  as  an 
intervenor.  It  also  challenges  Judge  Sugar- 
man’s  approval  of  Loew’s  Theatres  petition. 


Wins  Critics  Award 

HOLLYWOOD:  Francis  J.  Carmody,  mo- 
tion picture  editor  of  the  Washington,  D.  C. 
Evening  Star,  has  been  selected  to  receive 
the  annual  critics’  award  of  the  Screen  Di- 
rectors’ Guild,  it  is  announced  by  George 
Sidney,  president  of  the  guild.  The  award 
for  outstanding  writing  in  the  field  of  mo- 
tion picture  criticism  during  the  past  year 
will  be  presented  to  Mr.  Carmody  at  a din- 
ner in  the  Biltmore  Bowl  January  29. 


26 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


The  n ®>V  RKO  will  grow  stronger  in  1956/ 

release  after  release. ..when  these  fine  pictures  hit  the 
screens. ..each  backed  by  an  advanced-type  of  pre-selling 


TFRRY  MOORE  • ROBERT  BEATTY^  WILLIAM  SYLVESTER 


25 


CASH  ON  oEUtmy 

SHELLEY  WINTERS  • PEGGY  CUMMINS  • JOHN  GREGSON 


SUP£PSCOPi 


FFBROARY  15  reuEAS^ 


The  Brain  Machine 

PATRICK  BARR -ELIZABETH  ALLAN  • MAXWELL  REED 


FEBRUARY 


^^^^^^^^A^^i2^GENERA^ELEASE 


HOWARD  HUGHES 


presents 


JOHN  WAYNE  • SUSAN  HAYWARD 


Cl  N EM  aScoP^ 


TECH  N ICOL.OR 


1 


..a^rCH  7 RA-^ClEASE 


14  RELEASE 


VID  O.  SELZNICK 

cca 


DPI  fa<;f 


rGREAT  DAY 
IN  THE  MORNING 


VIRGINIA  MAYO  • ROBERT  STACK  • RUTH  ROMAN 


Si/P£/?SCOPE 


Pfifi#  ^ 

TECHNICOLOR 


MONA  FREEMAN 
GENE  NELSON 


^'^PRIL  18  RE-RELEaSE 


■iTraB  BD©  ©CSV 


KIRK  DOUGLAS  • DEWEY  MARTIN 
ELIZABETH  THREATT  • ARTHUR  HDNNICUTT 


APRIL  25 


•> I c aS E 


While  the  City  Sleeps 


DANA  ANDREWS  • RHONDA  FLEMING  • IDA  LDPINO  • GEORGE  SANDERS  • THOMAS  MITCHELL  • SALLY  FORREST 


ond  that's  only  the  beginning. ..from  the 


us; 


THE  WINNERS  CIRCLE 

Pictures  which  were  reported  as  doing  above  average  business  in  key  cities  of  the 
nation  for  the  week  ended  January  7 were: 


Scititte  Case 
Decisiawt  Is 
Heserveit 

BUFFALO : Another  chapter  has  been  con- 
cluded in  the  18-year-old  anti-trust  case 
against  the  Schine  Company.  The  second 
trial  before  Federal  Judge  Harold  P.  Burke 
lasted  just  two  days  here,  Wednesday  and 
Thursday,  January  4 and  5. 

Government  and  defense  attorneys  rested 
Thursday  afternoon  in  the  retrial  of  the 
Schine  defendants  on  criminal  and  civil 
contempt  charges.  Judge  Burke  reserved 
decision  and  fixed  March  5 as  the  deadline 
for  filing  briefs. 

The  case  will  be  decided  by  Judge  Burke 
on  the  basis  of  the  briefs,  testimony  taken 
during  the  two-day  retrial  and  evidence  sub- 
mitted during  the  original  trial  before  the 
late  Judge  John  Knight.  Judge  Knight 
heard  the  non-jury  case  from  December, 
1953,  until  March,  1954.  He  died  before  he 
could  hand  down  a decision. 

In  the  retrial,  the  Government  and  de- 
fense agreed  to  have  Judge  Burke  decide 
the  case  almost  entirely  on  the  record  com- 
piled before  Judge  Knight.  Testimony  was 
limited  only  to  negotiations  on  a 1949  con- 
sent decree,  which  the  defendants  are  ac- 
cused of  violating.  The  decree  ordered 
Schine  to  sell  39  theatres. 

In  the  original  contempt  trial.  Judge 
Knight  refused  to  accept  testimony  on  the 
negotiations.  A decision  is  not  expected 
until  some  months  after  the  briefs  are  filed. 


Boasberg  in  Sales  Post 

Charles  Boasberg  has  been  named  to  the 
newly  created  post  of  supervisor  of  sales 
for  Cecil  B.  DeMille’s  production  of  “The 
Ten  Commandments,”  and  the  Ponti-De- 
Laurentis  production  of  “War  and  Peace,” 
it  is  announced  by  George  Weltner,  in 
charge  of  world  wide  sales  for  Paramount 
Pictures.  Mr.  Boasberg  came  to  Paramount 
last  September  as  special  assistant  to  Mr. 
Weltner  following  almost  thirty  years  of  ex- 
ecutive distribution  posts  with  MGM  and 
RKO  Radio  Pictures. 


"Golden  Arm"  to  Loew's 

“The  Man  with  the  Golden  Arm”  has 
been  booked  by  the  Loew’s  national  circuit 
for  24  key  engagements  beginning  January 
26,  it  is  announced  by  William  J.  Heineman, 
United  Artists  vice-president  in  charge  of 
distribution.  The  Otto  Preminger  production 
will  be  booked  by  Loew’s  in  Nashville, 
Providence,  Buffalo,  Rochester,  Syracuse, 
Columbus,  Dayton,  Akron,  Canton,  Cleve- 
land, Toledo,  Houston,  Evansville,  Indianap- 
olis, St.  Louis,  Harrisburg,  Reading,  Nor- 
folk, Richmond,  Niagara  Falls,  Wilmington, 
Bridgeport,  Meriden  and  Waterbury. 


Albany:  Gate  op  Hell  (Harrison);  The 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts  (20th-Fox). 

Atlanta:  The  American  Lion  (B.V.)  2nd 
week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Indian  Fighter 
(U.A.) ; The  Last  Frontier  (Col.). 

Boston:  The  African  Lion  (B.V.) ; All 
That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I)  ; Artists 
AND  Models  (Par.) ; The  Court  Martial 
OF  Billy  Mitchell  (W.B.) ; Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM) ; I am  a Camera  (DCA)  ; 
Indian  Fighter  (U.A.) ; Lease  of  Life 
(IFE). 

Buffalo:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  3rd 
week;  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  3rd 
week;  The  Indian  Fighter  (U.A.)  2nd 
week;  The  Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts 
(20th-Fox) ; The  Rains  of  Ranchipur 
(20th-Fox)  3rd  week. 

Columbus:  The  African  Lion  (B.V.)  2nd 
week;  All  That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I)  ; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  2nd  week;  The 
Indian  Fighter  (U.A.). 

Denver:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  2nd 
week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  2nd  week;  Heidi  and 
Peter  (U.A.)  2nd  week;  The  Littlest 
Outlaw  (B.V.)  2nd  week;  The  Rains 
OP  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox)  2nd  week; 
The  Second  Greatest  Sex  (U-I). 

Des  Moines:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  3rd 
week. 

Detroit:  All  That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I) ; 
Artists  and  Models  (Par.) ; The  Court 
Martial  op  Billy  Mitchell  (W.B.) ; 
The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox) 
2nd  week. 

Hartford:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 

(U-I) ; The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  3rd  week;  The  Houston 
Story  (Col.) ; Rains  of  Ranchipur 
(20th-Fox)  2nd  week. 

Indianapolis:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  3rd  week;  Indian 
Fighter  (U.A.)  2nd  week. 

Jacksonville:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I)  3rd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of 
Billy  Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  The 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts  (20th-Fox) ; 
Teen-Age  Crime  Wave  (Col.). 

Kansas  City:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.).;  Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Indian  Fighter 
(U.A.) ; The  Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts 
(20th-Fox) . 

Memphis:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  2nd 
week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls 


(MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Indian  Fighter 
(U.A.) ; The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th- 
Fox). 

Miami:  All  That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I) 
2nd  week;  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  3rd 
week;  Hill  24  Doesn’t  Answer  (Cont. 
Dist.) ; Kismet  (MGM). 

Milwaukee:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Rains  of 
Ranchipur  (20th-Fox). 

Minneapolis:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.); 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  2nd  week;  The 
Indian  Fighter  (U.A.)  2nd  week;  The 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts  (20th-Fox) ; 
Running  Wild  (U-I) ; Tarantula 
(U-I) ; The  Trouble  With  Harry 
(Par.). 

New  Orleans:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I)  2nd  week;  The  Big  Knife  (U.A.) 
2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Rains  of 
Ranchipur  (20th-Fox). 

Oklahoma  City:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
3rd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  3rd  week;  The  Indian 
Fighter  (U.A.) ; Man  with  the  Gun 
(U.A.)  2nd  week;  The  Rains  of 
Ranchipur  (20th-Fox)  2nd  week. 

Pittsburgh:  The  African  Lion  (B.V.)  3rd 
week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  The  Rains 
OP  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox)  3rd  week; 
Sheep  Has  Five  Legs  (UMPO)  3rd 
week. 

Portland:  Artists  andj  Models  (Par.)  2nd 
week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls 
MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Indian  Fighter 
U.A.)  2nd  week;  The  Rains  op  Ranchi- 
pur (20th-Fox)  2nd  week. 

San  Francisco:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I)  2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of 
Billy  Mitchell  (W.B.)  3rd  week; 
Diabolique  (UMPO)  2nd  week;  Guys 
and  Dolls  (MGM)  7th  week;  Indian 
Fighter  (U.A.)  3rd  week;  Kismet 
(MGM)  3rd  week;  Man  Who  Loved 
Redheads  (U.A.)  2nd  week;  Night  My 
Number  Came  Up  (Cont.  Dist.)  3rd 
week;  Rains  op  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox) 
3rd  week. 

Vancouver:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  Footsteps  in  the  Fog  (Col.)  ; 
Good  Morning,  Miss  Dove  (20th-Fox) 
2nd  week;  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  2nd 
week;  The  Spoilers  (U-I). 

Washington:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.) ; The  Desperate 
Hours  (Par.)  8th  week;  Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  7th  week;  The  Indian  Fighter 
(U.A.) ; Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th- 
Fox)  2nd  week. 


30 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


A wha.1: 

picture 


will  zoom 

into  public  attention 
via  a national 
magazine 

campaign 
hitting  over 


85,000,000 

potential 

movie-goers... 


BhuiQe 


// 


is  the  picture  that  over 
85,000,000  potential  movie-goers 
can  read  about  in  the 
nation’s  top  magazines, 

including  LIFE. ..LOOK... 


COLLIER’S. ..AMERICAN 
...  COSMOPOLITAN...  REDBOOK... 


SEVENTEEN... and  every 
major  consumer  motion 
picture  publication! 


COLUMBIA  PICTURES  presents 


KIM  NOVAK 


BETTY  FIELD  • SUSAN  STRASBERG  • CLIFF  ROBERTSON 


AS  ROSEMARY 

Scieenpiayby  Ba^ed  upon  the  pla»  Picoic  by  Produced  on  the  siage  by 

DANIEL  TARADASH  ■ WILLIAM  INGE  • THEATRE  GUILD,  Inc.  a..d  JOSHUA  LOGAN 
Ddcirtb,  JOSHUA  LOGAN  p.otoeat.,  FRED  KOHLMAR 


HALL 


^V/\L)S\C 


radio 


WILL  HAVE 


piCNlO’ 


PRINTED  IN  U.  S.  A. 


Stufiy  TrenA 
A. nit  Tastes^ 
Xuknr  Urges 

Contending  that  the  audiences  are  ahead 
of  tlie  industry  in  their  intelligence  growth, 
Adolph  Zukor,  board  chairman  of  Para- 
mount Pictures,  in  an  interview  last  week 
marking  his  83rd  birthday,  his  53rd  year  in 
the  industry  and  his  wedding  anniversary, 
said,  “we  must  study  the  trends  and  tastes 
of  the  public  rather  than  attempt  to  change 
them.  That’s  the  philosophy  Pve  been  prac- 
ticing the  last  40  or  50  years  and  it  still 
holds  good.” 

He  added  that  the  public  today,  in  his 
opinion,  wants  a strong  dramatic  story  that 
carries  a message  and  is  entertaining.  The 
subject,  he  said,  could  deal  with  politics, 
big  business,  world  affairs,  science  or  other 
suitable  elements. 

“Showmanship  is  mandatory,”  he  declared, 
as  he  urged  exhibitors  to  advertise  the  big 
pictures  properly  on  the  local  level  to  achieve 
maximum  attendance  results.  In  answer  to 
a (|uestion  about  the  eventual  meeting  of  TV 
and  motion  pictures,  he  said,  “when  and 
how,  only  the  future  can  tell.” 

Forecasting  good  business  for  the  next  six 
months,  Mr.  Zukor  based  his  prediction  on 
the  industry  lineup  of  outstanding  pictures, 
including  his  own  company’s  “The  Ten 
Commandents”  and  “War  and  Peace.”  He 
added  that  with  the  competitive  factor  of 
TV,  only  outstanding  pictures  draw  audi- 
ences out  of  their  homes. 


Tushinsky 5 to  Demonstrate 
New  Photographing  Lens 

HOLLYWOOD : A new  20mm  photograph- 
ing lens  developed  for  Superscope  by  Joseph 
and  Irving  Tushinsky  in  association  with 
Dr.  W’erner  Bender,  chief  Superscope  physi- 
cist, will  be  demonstrated  by  the  Tushinskys 
for  the  trade  shortly.  The  lens  is  “of  su- 
perior quality  in  resolution,  definition  and 
depth  of  focus,”  its  makers  have  announced. 


Universal  Signs  Rooney 
For  "Francis"  Film 

HOLLYWOOD : Universal  announced  here 
last  week  that  Mickey  Rooney  has  been 
signed  to  carry  on  the  “Francis”  series,  in 
the  central  role  created  by  Donald  O’Connor 
and  played  in  five  subsequent  “Francis”  films 
by  him.  Mr.  Rooney  will  star  in  “Francis 
in  the  Haunted  House,”  for  which  William 
Raynor  and  Herbert  iMargolis  are  complet- 
ing the  screenplay  and  which  is  due  to  start 
shooting  late  next  month  or  early  in  March. 
Chill  Wills,  who  has  provided  the  voice  of 
Francis,  the  talking  mule,  presumably  will 
continue  to  do  so  in  the  new  film. 


J^oiiuwood  »Sc 


^cene 


HOLLYWOOD  BUREAU 

The  first  week  of  1956  ended  with  seven 
new  pictures  going  into  production  and  four 
others  completed,  increasing  the  over-all 
total  to  28. 

Sam  Katzman  began  filming  “Rock 
Around  the  Clock”  for  Columbia,  with  Fred 
F.  Sears  directing.  Johnny  Johnston,  Bill 
Haley  & His  Comets,  Alix  Talton,  John 
Archer,  Lisa  Gaye  and  Henry  Slate  are  in  it. 

Nacirema  Productions,  independent,  began 
shooting  "Count  the  Dead.”  Norman  T. 
Herman  is  the  executive  producer,  Byron 
Roberts  is  associate.  It  has  Howard  Duff, 
Gloria  McGehee,  Dick  Foran  and  Barton 
MacLane  heading  the  cast.  David  T.  Yoko- 
zeki  is  producer ; Lee  Sholem  director. 

“The  Leather  Saint”  is  a Paramount 
project  in  VistaVision,  with  Paul  Douglas, 
John  Derek,  Jody  Lawrance,  Cesar  Romero, 
Richard  Shannon  and  Ernest  Truex  among 
the  principals.  Norman  Retchin  is  the  pro- 
ducer, and  Alvin  Ganzer  is  directing. 

Herbert  Bayard  Swope,  Jr.,  started 
“Hilda  Crane,”  in  CinemaScope  and  De 
Luxe  color,  for  20th  Century-Fox,  with  Guy 
Madison,  Jean  Simmons,  Jean  Pierre  Au- 
mont,  Peggy  Knudsen,  Evelyn  Varden  and 
Judith  Evelyn  heading  the  cast.  Philip 
Dunne  is  the  director. 

Robert  L.  Jacks,  producer,  and  Robert 
Webb,  director,  started  “The  Proud  Ones,” 
in  CinemaScope  and  De  Luxe  color,  with 
Robert  Ryan,  Virginia  Mayo,  Jeff  Hunter 
and  Robert  Middleton  as  top  players.  It’s 
another  for  20th  Century-Fox. 

“Rebel  in  Town,”  is  a Bel-Air  Production 
for  United  Artists  release.  It  has  John 
Payne,  Ruth  Roman,  J.  Carrol  Naish,  Ben 
Cooper,  John  Smith  and  Ben  Johnson  in  the 
cast.  Aubrey  W.  Schenck  is  the  executive 
producer  and  Howard  W.  Koch  producer. 
A1  Werker  is  directing. 

United  Artists  will  also  distribute  “Flight 
to  Hong  Kong,”  a Sabre  Production  now 
shooting  in  Hong  Kong.  Rory  Calhoun  and 
Dolores  Donlon  are  the  top  players.  \’ic 
Orsatti  is  the  executive  producer,  and  Josepli 
Newman  is  the  producer-director. 


RKO  to  Produce  "Misty" 

HOLLYWOOD : RKO  Radio  Pictures  has 
signed  Ralph  Dietrich  and  Martin  Berkeley 
to  produce  and  write  “Misty,”  the  award- 
winning novel  by  Marguerite  Henry.  Shoot- 
ing will  commence  in  July.  “Misty”  is  an 
adventure  story  about  wild  ponies  on  the 
islands  off  the  Virginia  Capes. 


Craft  Earnings  Down 

HOLLYWOOD : The  average  earnings  of 
studio  craft  workers  for  the  month  of  No- 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

THIS  WEEK  IN 
PRODUCTION 


STARTED  (7) 

COLUMBIA 

Rock  Around  the  Clock 
INDEPENDENT 
Count  the  Dead 
(Nacirema  Prods.) 

PARAMOUNT 

The  Leather  Saint 
(VistaVision) 
20TH-FOX 
Hilda  Crane 

COMPLETED  (4) 

ALLIED  ARTISTS 

The  Magnificent 
Roughnecks 

UNITED  ARTISTS 

Bandido  (Bandido 
Prod.;  CinemaScope: 
De  Luxe  Color) 

SHOOTING  (21) 

COLUMBIA 

Black  Mamba 
(Todon  Prods.; 
CinemaScope: 
Technicolor) 

Zarak  Khan  (Warwick; 
CinemaScope; 
Technicolor) 

Portrait  in  Smoke 
(Film  Locations) 

INDEPENDENT 

Tarzan  and  the  Lost 
Safari  (Sol  Lesser 
Prods.;  Eastman 
Color) 

MGM 

The  Catered  Affair 
The  Living  Idol  (Al 
Lewin;  CinemaScope; 
Eastman  Color) 

PARAMOUNT 

Pardners  (VistaVision; 

Technicolor) 

Ten  Commandments 
(VistaVision; 
Technicolor) 

REPUBLIC 


( CinemaScope; 

De  Luxe  Color) 

The  Proud  Ones 
(CinemaScope; 

De  Luxe  Color) 

UNITED  ARTISTS 

Rebel  In  Town 
(Bel-Air  Prods.) 
Flight  to  Hong  Kong 
(Sabre  Prods.) 


Ambassador's  Daughter 
(Norman  Krasna 
Prods.;  CinemaScope; 
Eastman  Color) 

U-l 

Apache  Agent 
(CinemaScope; 
Technicolor) 


Lisbon  (Naturama: 
Trucolor) 

20TH-FOX 

The  Sixth  of  June 

The  Man  In  the  Gray 
Flannel  Suit  (Cinenna- 
Scope;  De  Luxe 
Color) 

23  Paces  to  Baker  Street 
(CinemaScope: 

De  Luxe  Color) 

Revolt  of  Mamie  Stover 
(CinemaScope; 

De  Luxe  Color) 

King  and  I (Cinema- 
Scope; De  Luxe 
Color) 

U-l 

The  Gentle  Web 
(Technicolor) 

Johnny  Salvo 

Written  on  the  Wind 
(Technicolor) 

WARNER  BROS. 

Baby  Doll  (Newtown 
Prod) 

The  Spirit  of  St.  Louis 
( CinemaScope; 
WarnerColor) 

Santiago  (Warner- 
Color) 


Dakota  Incident 
(Trucolor) 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiii 

vember  were  down  slightly  from  the  October 
level,  it  was  indicated  in  the'  monthly  report 
of  the  California  Department  of  Industrial 
Relations.  The  October  average  was  $128.81. 
November  averaged  $125.60.  The  November 
work  week  was  down  one  hour,  to  42.6. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14.  1956 


33 


FILM  BUYERS  RATING 


Film  Iniyers  of  independent  circuits  in  the  U.  S.  rate  current 
prroJuct  on  the  basis  of  its  performance  in  their  theatres.  This' 
report  coiers  120  attractions,  4,525  playdates. 

Titles  run  alphabetically.  Numerals  refer  to  the  number  of  en- 
gagements on  each  attraction  reported.  The  tabulation  is  cumula- 
tive. Dagger  (t)  denotes  attractions  published  for  the  first  time. 
Asterisk  ("')  indicates  attractions  which  are  listed  for  the  last  time. 

EX  means  Excellent;  AA — Above  Average;  AV — Average; 
BA — Below  Average;  PR — Poor. 


EX  AA  AV  BA  PR 


A & C Meet  the  Mummy  (U-l) 

- 

4 

13 

8 

1 

(African  Lion,  The  (B.V.)  

1 

- 

4 

1 

- 

Ain't  Misbehavin'  (U-l)  

- 

3 

28 

14 

2 

(Apache  Woman  (A.R.C.)  

2 

2 

- 

- 

(Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  

■ . - 

6 

- 

— 

Big  Knife,  The  (U.A.)  

- 

- 

1 

5 

9 

Blood  Alley  (W.B.)  

- 

7 

17 

12 

- 

Bring  Your  Smile  Along  (Col.) 

- 

- 

3 

1 

10 

♦Bullet  for  Joey,  A (U.A.)  

- 

- 

3 

5 

5 

♦Cell  2455,  Death  Row  (Col.) 

- 

3 

14 

8 

- 

Chicago  Syndicate  (Col.)  

- 

2 

6 

6 

Cobweb,  The  (MGM)  

- 

6 

19 

15 

8 

Count  Three  and  Pray  (Col.)  

1 

4 

10 

5 

1 

Creature  with  the  Atom  Brain  (Col.) 

- 

13 

5 

6 

1 

♦Cult  of  the  Cobra  (U-l)  ... 

1 

2 

2 

5 

2 

♦Daddy  Long  Legs  (20th-Fox)  

1 

17 

28 

8 

9 

Dam  Busters  (W.B.)  

- 

1 

9 

2 

4 

Davy  Crockett  (B.V.)  

10 

36 

35 

8 

1 

Desert  Sands  (U.A.) 

- 

- 

4 

6 

1 1 

Desperate  Hours,  The  (Par.) 

- 

- 

2 

4 

9 

(Duel  on  the  Mississippi  (Col.) 

- 

- 

2 

1 

2 

♦End  of  the  Affair  (Col.)  

- 

2 

3 

14 

12 

♦Eternal  Sea,  The  (Rep.) 

- 

7 

14 

17 

9 

Far  Horizons  (Par.)  

- 

1 

33 

13 

7 

Female  on  the  Beach  (U-l) 

1 

4 

30 

14 

9 

Five  Against  the  House  (Col.) 

- 

- 

12 

4 

3 

Footsteps  in  the  Fog  (Col.) 

- 

- 

4 

2 

10 

Foxfire  (U-l) 

- 

20 

24 

14 

3 

Francis  in  the  Navy  (U-l) 

- 

1 1 

28 

1 1 

1 

Gentlemen  Marry  Brunettes  (U.A.) 

- 

4 

15 

7 

14 

Girl  in  the  Red  Velvet  Swing  (20th-Fox) 

- 

1 

15 

20 

17 

Girl  Rush,  The  (Par.) 

- 

- 

2 

19 

18 

Good  Morning,  Miss  Dove  (20th-Fox) 

- 

8 

2 

5 

4 

♦Hell's  Island  (Par.)  

- 

- 

13 

1 1 

12 

House  of  Bamboo  (20th-Fox)  

- 

20 

23 

15 

17 

How  to  Be  Very,  Very  Popular  (20th-Fox) 

- 

5 

39 

10 

13 

1 Am  a Camera  (D.C.A.)  

7 

2 

- 

- 

4 

1 Died  1,000  Times  (W.B.) 

- 

- 

3 

4 

3 

Illegal  (W.B.)  

- 

- 

6 

1 

2 

Interrupted  Melody  (MGM)  

- 

7 

1 6 

22 

10 

It  Came  From  Beneath  the  Sea  (Col.) 

1 

21 

9 

6 

3 

It's  Always  Fair  Weather  (MGM) 

- 

1 

13 

21 

25 

♦Jump  Into  Hell  (W.B.) 

- 

2 

5 

5 

- 

Kentuckian,  The  (U.A.)  

6 

26 

22 

9 

5 

King's  Thief,  The  (MGM)  

- 

- 

7 

1 1 

8 

(Kismet  (MGM)  

- 

1 

4 

1 

- 

♦Kiss  Me  Deadly  (U.A.) 

- 

- 

6 

3 

1 6 

Kiss  of  Fire  ( U-l ) 

1 

2 

1 1 

3 

Lady  and  the  Tramp  (B.V.) 

29 

27 

24 

4 

2 

Lady  Godiva  ( U-l ) 

- 

- 

3 

5 

3 

Land  of  the  Pharaohs  (W.B.) 

- 

3 

1 6 

23 

14 

♦Las  Vegas  Shakedown  (A.A.) 

- 

- 

3 

2 

- 

Last  Command,  The  (Rep.) 

- 

1 

7 

9 

12 

Left  Hand  of  God  (20th-Fox) 

- 

35 

19 

5 

4 

♦Looters,  The  (U-1)  

Love  Is  a Many-Splendored  Thing  (20th-Fox.) 

Love  Me  or  Leave  Me  (MGM)  

Lucy  Gallant  (Par.)  

Magnificent  Matador  (20th-Fox)  

Man  Alone,  A (Rep.)  

Man  From  Bitter  Ridge  (U-l)  

Man  From  Laramie  (Col.)  

Man  With  the  Gun  (U.A.)  

Marty  (U.A.)  

McConnell  Story,  The  (W.B.)  

Mister  Roberts  (W.B.)  

Moonfleet  (MGM)  

My  Sister  Eileen  (Col.)  

Naked  Street  (U.A.)  

Night  Holds  Terror  (Col.)  

Night  of  the  Hunter  (U.A.)  

Not  As  a Stranger  (U.A.) 

One  Desire  (U-l)  

Pearl  of  the  South  Pacific  (RKO) 

Pete  Kelly's  Blues  (W.B.)  

Phenix  City  (A.A.)  

Private  War  of  Major  Benson  (U-l) 

Prize  of  Gold,  A (Col.)  

♦Prodigal,  The  (MGM)  

Purple  Mast  (U-l)  

Queen  Bee  (Col.)  

Quentin  Durward  (MGM)  

Rebel  Without  a Cause  (W.B.) 

(Return  of  Jack  Slade  (A.A.)  

♦Revenge  of  the  Creature  (U-l)  

♦Road  to  Denver  (Rep.)  

♦Robber's  Roost  (U.A.)  

♦Santa  Fe  Passage  (Rep.)  

Scarlet  Coat  (MGM)  

Sea  Chase,  The  (W.B.)  

(Second  Greatest  Sex,  The  (U-l) 

Seven  Cities  of  Gold  (20th-Fox) 

Seven  Little  Foys  (Par.)  

Seven  Year  Itch  (20th_Fox)  

Shrike,  The  (U-l)  

Sincerely  Yours  (W.B.)  

Soldier  of  Fortune  (20th-Fox) 

Son  of  SInbad  (RKO)  

♦Strange  Lady  in  Town  (W.B.) 

♦Strategic  Air  Command  (Par.) 

Summertime  (U.A.) 

Tall  Man  Riding  (W.B.)  

Tall  Men,  The  (20th-Fox) 

(Tarantula  (U-l)  

Tender  Trap,  The  (MGM) 

Tennessee's  Partner  (RKO) 

(Texas  Lady  (RKO)  

Three  Stripes  in  the  Sun  (Col.) 

♦Tight  Spot  (Col.)  

To  Catch  a Thief  (Par.)  

To  Hell  and  Back  (U-l) 

Treasure  of  Pancho  Villa  (RKO)  . 

Trial  (MGM)  

Ulysses  (Par.)  

View  from  Pompey's  Head  (20th-Fox) 

Virgin  Queen  (20th-Fox)  

Warriors,  The  (A.A.)  

We're  No  Angels  (Par.)  

Wichita  (A.A.)  

You're  Never  Too  Young  (Par.)  


EX  AA  AV 


18 

7 


2 

2 

10 

I 

7 

36 


10 

6 

3 

14 

2 

4 

3 

2 

1 

33 

43 

39 

2 
2 

I 

6 

21 

1 

3 

2 

1 

2 

I 


24 

36 


5 

34 

I 

I 

28 

29 

5 

10 


3 

34 


18 

10 

23 

2 

18 

2 


13 

2 

19 

3 

6 

2 

7 

2 

28 

36 

2 

I 

26 

3 
1 1 
30 

6 

15 

23 

I 

4 
I 
I 

1 

4 

12 

26 

2 

I 

6 


7 

19 

21 


6 

38 

29 

7 

14 
5 
13 
24 
4 
10 
32 
I I 
4 
19 


3 

9 

12 

10 

8 

8 

20 

29 

10 

34 

10 

3 

3 

8 

2 

22 

8 

6 

I I 
8 
52 

4 
9 

10 

19 

7 

5 

26 

10 

21 

13 

8 

12 
I I 

5 

10 

I 

3 

8 

21 

3 

9 

16 

7 

9 

12 

5 

21 

14 

18 


BA 


13 
10 

8 

7 

22 

8 

9 

14 

3 

4 
14 

3 

20 

8 

4 
6 

13 

10 

13 

14 
34 

14 
18 
8 

27 

15 

3 

6 

2 

5 
3 

3 

6 

9 

18 

I 

9 

10 

4 

15 

6 

16 
16 
16 

5 
4 

1 1 
I 

3 

4 

6 
3 
3 

10 

14 
I 

8 

9 

10 

15 
10 

5 

22 

5 

13 


PR 


9 

3 

6 

7 

19 

10 

7 

8 

17 

3 

6 

14 

2 
1 1 
2 
I 

7 

9 

9 

I 

8 

3 
9 
6 

4 

15 


1 

3 

2 

7 

21 

5 

18 

10 

2 

12 

3 

4 
14 
2 

9 

3 


4 


I I 
5 

18 

I 

5 

22 

13 


10 

4 

3 


34 


MQTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14.  1956 


OisMtey  Year 
Profit  Up  to 
Sh352.576 

LOS  .-JA  GELES:  Consolidated  net  profit 
of  \\  alt  Disney  Productions  in  the  fiscal 
year  ended  October  1.  1955,  was  $1,352,576, 
equal  to  $2.07  a share  on  the  652,840  shares 
of  common  stock  outstanding,  Roy  O.  Dis- 
ney, president,  announced  this  week  in  the 
company’s  annual  report  to  shareholders. 
This  compares  with  a profit  of  $733,852,  or 
$1.12  a share,  in  the  1954  fiscal  }"ear.  Pror 
vision  for  income  taxes  was  $1,150,000  in 
1955  and  $840,000  in  1954. 

Gross  income  in  1955  rose  to  $24,638,652 
from  $11,641,408  reported  for  the  preceding 
year.  Substantial  grosses  from  “20,000 
Leagues  Under  the  Sea”  and  “Lady  and  the 
Tramp,”  as  well  as  gross  revenues  from 
television  and  the  theatrical  release  of  “Davy 
Crockett”  accounted  for  much  of  the  in- 
crease, Mr.  Disney  said. 

At  the  same  time  he  pointed  out  that 
gross  film  rental  income  for  the  past  year 
is  not  strictly  comparable  with  that  of  the 
prior  years  because  of  the  adoption  during 
the  year  of  the  policy  of  distributing  all 
pictures  in  the  United  States  and  Britain 
through  wholly-owned  subsidiaries.  The 
impetus  of  television  also  was  credited  with 
increases  in  revenues  from  character  mer- 
chandising and  tw’o  wholly-owned  music 
publishing  subsidiaries,  Walt  Disney  Music 
Company  and  W’onderland  Music  Company. 

Air.  Disney  said  several  major  activities 
launched  during  the  past  year  had  added 
strength  and  diversification  to  over-all  oper- 
ations. These  included  the  TV  shows  “Dis- 
neyland” (started  October  27,  1954)  and 


Richard  W.  Altschuler,  vice-president 
and  director  of  world  wide  sales  for  Re- 
public Pictures,  has  been  elected  chairman 
of  the  sales  managers  committee  of  the 
Motion  Picture  Association  of  America. 
He  succeeds  AIorey  Goldstein,  general 
sales  manager  of  Allied  Artists. 

D.-wid  Shatt’Uck,  treasurer  of  Technicolor 
Alotion  Picture  Corporation  since  July, 
1936,  this  week  was  also  named  treasurer 
of  Technicolor,  Inc.,  succeeding  Lester 
G.  Clark,  who  remains  a member  of  the 
board  of  each  organization.  Also  this 
week,  B.  J.  Bird,  formerly  with  the  Na- 
tional Association  of  Manufacturers,  was 
named  acting  director  of  public  relations 
and  advertising  for  Technicolor. 

Leon  Kelmer,  who  retired  this  week  as 
manager  of  the  RKO  Albee  theatre  in 
downtown  Brooklyn,  was  tendered  a 
luncheon  Monday  at  Rumpelmayer’s  by 
RKO  Theatres’  home  office  executives 
headed  by  Sol  A.  Schwartz,  president. 

Charles  A.  Moses  has  been  appointed  di- 
rector of  advertising,  publicity  and  ex- 


“Mickey  Alouse  Club”  (started  October  3, 
1955)  ; the  expansion  of  activities  of  Bueiia 
Vista  Film  Distriliution  Co.  and  Walt  Dis- 
ney Film  Distributors,  and  the  Disneyland 
amusement  park  in  Anaheim,  Calif. 

Mr.  Disney  said  that  a prime  objective 
for  the  coming  year  is  to  take  steps  to 
replace  a substantial  portion  of  the  short 


ploitation  for  Bel-Air  Productions,  it  W'as 
announced  by  Aubrey  Schenck  and 
Howard  W.  Kock,  executive  producer 
and  producer,  respectively. 

Lynn  Farnol,  head  of  his  owm  public  rela- 
tions firm,  has  been  added  to  the  New 
York  Board  of  Education’s  Commission 
on  Integration.  He  will  serve  without  fee 
as  the  Commission’s  public  relations  aid. 

Siegfried  Horowitz  has  been  appointed 
Philadelphia  sales  manager  for  I.F.E.  He 
gives  up  his  present  post  as  sales  man- 
ager for  Universal  in  Philadelphia.  He 
succeeds  Irving  Shiffman,  transferred  to 
Boston. 

Ben  Morris,  long-time  manager  of  Colum- 
bia’s home  office  service  department,  has 
been  named  executive  in  charge  of  Colum- 
bia’s copyright  protection  department,  suc- 
ceeding John  Kahane,  who  transferred 
to  the  Screen  Gems  TV  subsidiary  in  a 
special  executive  capacity.  AIorton  Saltz- 
MAN  has  been  named  manager  of  the 
service  department. 


term  borrowing  with  long  term  financing  to 
secure  a substantial  improvement  in  the 
working  capital  position.  Last  year  the  com- 
pany’s new  activities  reduced  working  cap- 
ital by  $1,630,858.  With  earnings  for  1956 
expected  to  equal  or  exceed  those  of  1955,  it 
is  planned  that  payment  of  dividends  wdll 
be  made  when  refinancing  is  accomplished. 


"Pride  and  Passion"  Exhibit 
On  Display  in  New  York 

On  display  for  a week  to  January  19  is 
producer  Stanley  Kramer’s  personal  file  of 
the  pre-production  phase  of  his  new  film, 
“The  Pride  and  the  Passion,”  to  be  filmed  in 
Spain  this  Spring  with  Cary  Grant,  Prank 
Sinatra  and  Sophia  Loren.  The  collection 
is  at  the  Associated  American  Artists  gal- 
leries in  New  York.  It  includes  sketches 
by  production  designer  Rudolf  Sternad  and 
by  Mr.  Kramer,  of  locales  to  be  photo- 
graphed and  of  camera  angles  to  be  used. 
The  film  will  be  in  VistaVision  and  color  by 
Technicolor  for  United  Artists  release. 


"Lease  of  Life"  Released 

“Lease  of  Life,”  I.F.E.  Releasing  Cor- 
poration’s Eastmancolor  drama  starring 
Robert  Donat,  goes  into  national  release  dur- 
ing January  and  February  with  dates  in  11 
key  cities,  it  is  announced  by  Manny  Reiner, 
I.F.E.  general  .sales  manager. 


COLUMBIA  PICTURES  ANNOUNCES  THAT  PRINTS  OF  THE  FOLLOWING 
PICTURES  ARE  NOW  AVAILABLE  IN  OUR  EXCHANGES  FOR  SCREENING 


m 

m 


starring 

John  LUND  • William  BENDIX 
Keefe  BRASSELLE 
Richard  BOONE  • William  LESLIE 

Screen  Play  by  CRANE  WILBUR  • Based  on  a story  by  Ben  Finney 
Produced  by  BRYAN  FOY  • Directed  by  LEWIS  SEILER 


PAUIDOUGUSRUTH  ROMAN 

wi.B0NAR  COLLEANO 

GREGOIRE  ASLAN  • SIDNEY  JAMES 
Screen  Play  by  PHILIP  IORDAN  ■ Producer)  by  M, ).  FRANKOVICH 
Direcled  by  KEN  HUGHES  • A FRANKOVICH  Production 


starring 


GENE  BARRY  • BARBARA  HALE  • EDWARD  ARNDLD 

with  PAUL  RICHARDS  'Story  and  Screen  Play  by  JAMES  B.  CORDON 
Produced  by  SAM  KAHMAN  < Directed  by  WILLIAM  CASTLE 
A CLOVER  PRODUCTION 


_ PbrnrAr 

VUNSI6HT  Pass 

inBRIAII-iiniiiiBIIAi'iiaiinLONG 

story  and  Screen  Play  by  DAVID  LANG 
Produced  by  WALLACE  MacflONALD  • Directed  by  FRED  f.  SEARS 


36 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14.  1956 


ANNUAL  POLL 

NOMINATED 


DIRK  BOGARDE 

RANK  ORGANISATION  CONTRACT  STAR 

Top  international  box-office  Star 


I 


& POST 
^ CABLE  & 


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tireless 


BOGARDES  DOCTOR 


GREGSON 


CAA/ADA' 


■ Strength’.  Retain;) 


nal  Stars  m 


Ten  ^liS22ii2 


(Stars 


PETER  FIHCH  . ANTHONY  STEEL  ^ 

n 


IE  CARSOtl 


ALBANY 

The  January  schedule  of  releases  is  thin, 
while  that  for  February  and  March  is  fat, 
some  area  exhibitor  sources  believe.  . . . The 
first  dinner  and  screening,  for  couples,  in 
the  new  Variety  Club  rooms  was  scheduled 
Jan.  13.  Cocktails  and  a smorgasbord  were 
to  be  followed  by  exhibiton  of  a Universal 
feature.  Committee  in  charge:  Jules  Perl- 
mutter,  Norman  Jackter  and  Max  Zucker- 
man.  . . . Mrs.  Frances  Jeffers  remained  as 
manager  of  State  in  Mechanicville,  and 
Harold  Loomis  at  Capitol  in  Whitehall, 
when  Jules  Perlmutter  took  the  houses  on 
lease  from  Benton  circuit  of  Saratoga.  Perl- 
mutter, who  assumes  operation  of  Benton’s 
Capitol  in  Ballston  Spa  Jan.  30,  named  Vin- 
cent Fay  as  manager  of  Royal,  Albany,  on 
relighting  the  neighborhood  via  lease  from 
Neil  Heilman.  He  has  conducted  the  Para- 
mount here  on  a similar  arrangement  since 
Maj’.  . . . Chris  Pope,  Schine  booker,  visited 
Film  Row.  . . . The  Harvey  English  Thea- 
tres, headquartered  in  Hancock,  are  being 
run  by  Leonard  Thompson  as  general  man- 
ager and  Margaret  Smith  as  ’jooker. 

ATLANTA 

Visiting  on  the  Row  recently  were : Rob- 
ert Rainey,  Hatfield  drive-in,  Athens,  Ala. ; 
Fred  Yarbrough,  Star-Vue  Drive-in,  Hills- 
boro, Ala. ; Herman  Abrams,  Lumpkin  thea- 
tre, Lumpkin,  Ga. ; Jay  Soloman,  Indepen- 
dent Theatres,  Chattanooga,  Tenn.,  and 
Tommie  Lam,  Lam  Amusement  Co.,  Rome, 
Ga.  . . . C.  H.  Simpson,  theatre  owner  in 
Tennessee,  is  back  in  Chattanooga,  Tenn., 
after  attending  the  first  convention  of  the 
American  Releasing  Corp.  in  Los  Angeles. 
. . . Eddie  Foster,  former  sales  representa- 
tive for  exchanges  in  Atlanta  and  now  man- 
ager of  the  Montgomery  drive-in,  Mont- 
gomery, Ala.,  was  in  for  a visit  with  his 
many  friends.  . . . Bob  Tarwater  and  his 
family  are  back  from  Hartselle,  Ala.,  where 
they  visited  his  wife’s  mother.  . . . Billie 
Arp  is  the  new  booker  at  National  Screen 
Service.  She  replaces  Ann  Rakestraw,  who 
resigned.  . . . Doris  McDonald,  wife  of 
Walter  McDonald,  booker  at  United  Artists, 
is  home  after  a spell  at  the  hospital.  . . . 
Marcelle  Davis,  of  the  same  company,  is 
back  after  a visit  with  her  family  in  Toccoa, 
Ga.  . . . Harris  Rogers  has  been  appointed 
manager  of  the  Fair  Oak  drive-in.  Marietta, 
Ga.  He  comes  from  the  Etowah  drive-in, 
Etowah,  Tenn.,  which  closed  for  the  winter. 

BOSTON 

Business  was  brisk  over  the  New  Year 
weekend  although  the  midnight  shows  staged 
at  several  first  runs  were  more  than  disap- 
pointing. Many  managers  admitted  that  they 
could  have  shut  the  doors  after  the  final 
regular  performance  on  Sunday  night  as  the 
midnight  shows  were  so  badly  received.  . . . 
Adam  R.  Rizzo,  president  of  National  Con- 
struction Company  of  South  Boston,  has  en- 
tered the  drive-in  field  by  purchasing  prop- 
erty in  Georgetown,  Mass.,  on  Route  13  off 
Route  1,  for  construction  of  an  800-car 


drive-in.  Phil  Lowe,  of  Theatre  Candy  Com- 
pany, has  drawn  plans  for  a modern  four- 
lane  concession  building  for  a late  spring 
opening.  . . . Another  permit  for  a new 
drive-in  has  been  granted  to  Sidney  Good- 
ridge  of  Milford,  N.  H.,  who  will  erect  a 
500-car  drive-in  in  that  town.  . . . The  lease 
on  the  Stadium  theatre,  Woonsocket,  R.  L, 
wa.  not  renewed  by  New  England  Theatres 
Inc.  when  it  expired  December  31.  The  the- 
atre is  being  operated  by  Arthur  Darman 
who  owns  the  property.  ...  Ned  Eisner,  who 
had  leased  his  Cameo  theatre,  Uxbridge, 
Mass.,  for  the  past  two  years,  is  now  back 
at  the  helm,  as  of  January  1.  . . . Eimeral 
services  for  Joseph  Sandler,  36,  former  man- 
ager of  the  Kenmore  theatre,  were  held  Jan- 
uary 4.  He  died  at  Beth  Israel  Hospital 
from  injuries  suffered  in  an  auto  accident 
last  August  while  on  duty  at  his  Kiddieland 
Playground  in  Saugus. 

BUFFALO 

Elmer  E.  Lux,  former  president  of  the 
Buffalo  Common  Council ; lormer  manager 
ot  the  Buffalo  RkO  Radio  Ihctures  ex- 
change and  former  head  of  Elmart  Theatres, 
was  installed  as  third-time  chief  barker  of 
Tent  7,  Variety  Club  of  Buffalo  at  a dinner- 
dance  last  January  8 in  the  club’s  Delaware 
Avenue  headquarters,  at  which  time  the  en- . 
tire  1956  crew  also  was  installed.  . . . Sol 
A.  Schwartz,  president  of  RKO  Theatres, 
was  one  of  the  speakers  at  the  birthday  party 
of  Carl  S.  Hallauer,  president  of  Bausch  & 
Lomb  Optical  Company  of  Rochester,  Jan.  5 
in  the  Hotel  Seneca  ballroom  in  Kodak 
I own.  About  800  attended  the  dinner  party, 
which  was  sponsored  by  several  community 
groups.  . . . Call  letters  have  been  assigned 
Buffalo’s  new  UHF  station  which  is  to 
operate  on  Channel  59.  The  station  has  been 
designated  WNYT-TV.  Bernard  I.  Obletz, 
president  of  Erontier  Television,  Inc.,  said 
construction  will  begin  immediately.  . . . 
Chief  Barker  Elmer  F.  Lux  will  act  as 
moderator  at  the  Variety  Club’s  Open  House 
Jan.  21  when  the  theme  of  the  evening  will 
be  “What’s  My  Line?’’  . . . Charlie  Kosco, 
manager  of  the  local  20th  Century-Fox  ex- 
change journeyed  to  New  York  City  last 
weekend  for  conferences  with  home  office 
officials  and  a look  at  the  CinemaScope  55, 
which  is  to  be  demonstrated  for  the  Buffalo 
exchange  area  at  a special  preview  in  the 
Center  theatre  Jan.  31.  . . . Harry  Rubin, 
head  of  American  Broadcasting-Paramount 
Theatres  projection  department,  was  in  Buf- 
falo last  weekend. 

CHARLOTTE 

Twelve  employees  of  Charlotte  film  ex- 
changes have  been  nominated  for  Miss  Film 
Row  of  1956.  Exhibitors  will  vote  at  the 
annual  banquet  of  the  Theatre  Owners  As- 
sociation January  30.  . . . The  woman  se- 
lected will  win  an  all  expense  paid  trip  to 
Florida  in  February  or  March.  . . . Columbia 
Pictures  expects  to  occupy  its  new  Charlotte 
branch  in  the  next  several  weeks.  Remodel- 
ing of  the  building  has  nearly  been  com- 
pleted. . . . Charlotte  theatres  reported  busi- 


ness was  good  as  the  new  year  started.  But 
school  children  ended  their  Christmas  holi- 
day Jan.  2,  cutting  down  matinee  receipts 
somewhat.  . . . The  Charlotte  Screen  Guild 
Exchange  has  had  a change  of  name.  Ef- 
fective January  1 it  became  the  Howco  Ex- 
change. . . . Emery  Wister,  motion  picture 
and  television  editor  for  the  Charlotte  News, 
made  a flying  trip  to  Hollywood. 

CHICAGO 

Exhibitors  throughout  the  city  reported 
that  business  was  good  New  Year’s  Eve  and 
on  the  subsequent  holidays,  and  that  they 
won’t  be  too  unhappy  if  it  continues  as  it 
did  during  the  past  week.  ...  Ed  Moore  of 
the  Censor  Board  noted  that  20  per  cent  of 
the  films  reviewed  during  the  past  year  and 
a half  were  foreign  pictures.  . . . Kermit 
Russell  and  Dan  Quinn  started  operating 
the  Crawford  on  January  1.  They  already 
jointly  own  the  Lake  Shore.  . . . Norman 
Lindquist  has  joined  Wilding  Picture  Pro- 
ductions. For  the  past  six  years  he  was 
vice-president  of  the  Atlas  Film  Company. 
. . . Tom  Dowd,  manager  of  the  Ziegfeld  the- 
atre, was  in  New  York  to  discuss  new  Zieg- 
feld presentations  with  Richard  Davis.  . . . 
Congratulations  are  being  sent  to  Tom  Rior- 
dan  who,  after  four  years  of  intensive  work, 
achieved  his  goal  of  being  commissioned  as 
a lieutenant  in  the  United  States  Army. 
While  working  for  B & K at  the  Coronet 
theatre  in  Evanston,  he  continued  his  school- 
ing and  training  with  the  ROTC  and  at 
Loyola  University  here.  . . . The  Cinema 
Annex  theatre  is  making  a special  effort  to 
interest  midwest  farmers  in  the  midwest  pre- 
miere of  the  documentary  film,  “American 
Farmers  in  the  USSR”  January  20. 

CLEVELAND 

April  9 is  the  date  set  for  the  testimonial 
industry  banquet  in  honor  of  W.  Ward 
Marsh  who  is  celebrating  his  40th  anniver- 
sary as  motion  picture  critic  of  the  Plain 
Dealer.  . . . Max  Mink,  RKO  Palace  man- 
ager, added  a new  year  to  his  age  as  well  as 
his  calendar  on  January  first.  . . . “Guys  and 
Dolls”  is  doing  sensational  business  at 
Loew’s  Ohio  where  it  is  now  in  its  third 
week.  . . . Sub  run  houses  in  Cleveland  re- 
port a big  drop  in  attendance  immediately 
following  the  holiday  weekend  upward 
surge.  ...  In  a surprise  deal.  Selected  The- 
atres headed  by  Nate  and  Sam  Schultz, 
bought  the  assets  of  the  estate  of  the  late 
Frank  Gross,  in  the  Stillwell  and  Bedford 
theatres,  Bedford  and  the  Mapletown  thea- 
tre, Cleveland.  Theatres  are  now  under  the 
management  of  the  Selected  Theatres  circuit 
which  numbers  12  indoor  and  7 outdoor 
theatres  in  this  territory.  All  theatre  person- 
nel remains  unchanged  with  the  change  of 
ownership.  . . . Leo  Greenfield,  Buena  Vista 
district  manager,  and  his  wife  are  in  Florida 
for  two-week  vacation.  . . . Bob  Dittrick. 
MGM  booker,  celebrates  the  new  year  by 
moving  into  his  new  home  in  nearby  Berea. 

. . . Rockford  theatre,  Rockford,  which  has 
been  on  an  open  and  closed  policy  the  past 

(Continued  on  page  40) 


38 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14.  1956 


I l^ow  0linninQtiriQ  d^^^^^o^^iiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiin 

I ^and  quickly^ot  thousands  of  | 
I executives  desks  every  day ...  | 

I The  1956  Motion  Picture  The  1956  Television  | 

I ALMANAC  * ALMANAC  I 


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Both  volumes 
edited  by 

Charles  S.  Aaronson 


{Continued  from  page  38) 

vear,  is  closed  again.  . . . J.  \V.  Servies. 
'Xational  Theatre  Si:pply  vice-president  and 
central  district  manager,  announces  that  he 
has  completed  arrangements  with  John  Selby 
of  Selby  Industries,  Inc.,  Akron,  O.  to 
handle  the  sale  of  the  Selby  screen  towers 
through  its  branches. 

COLUMBUS 

Post-holiday  business  continued  on  the 
upgrade  with  third  weeks  announced  for 
"Guys  and  Dolls”  at  RKO  Palace  and  “The 
.\frican  Lion”  at  the  \\  orld.  “The  Indian 
Fighter”  at  Loew’s  Broad  and  “The  Game 
of  Love”  at  the  Bexley  started  second  weeks. 

. . . Western  star  Gene  Autry  will  bring 
his  show  to  the  new  Veterans’  Memorial 
here  Jan.  28-29.  . . . Wilbur  Smith  and  As- 
sociates, New  Haven,  Conn.,  will  make  a 
traffic  and  revenue  study  for  the  proposed 
1.200-car  parking  garage  under  the  State 
House  grounds  in  the  heart  of  the  downtown 
theatre  district.  The  firm’s  report  is  due 
July  1.  . . . Norman  Nadel,  theatre  editor 
of  the  Columbus  Citizen,  is  in  New  York  on 
a show-shopping  tour.  . . . Herman  “Bud” 
Kissel,  former  theatre  editor  of  the  Colum- 
bus Citizen,  is  recovering  in  ]\It.  Carmel 
Hospital  from  injuries  sustained  when  he 
struck  by  an  automobile.  . . . IManager  Rob- 
ert Sokol  of  Loew’s  Broad  announced  the 
booking  of  the  United  Artists’  release,  “The 
Man  with  the  Golden  Arm”  for  a January 
28  opening. 

DENVER 

As  a birthday  gift  to  his  wife,  Mayer 
.Monsky,  Universal  branch  manager,  set  up 
a three-way  telephone  hookup  to  their  son. 
stationed  with  the  Army  in  Germany,  and 
their  daughter,  attending  Wellesley.  Tab 
was  $5  a minute.  . . . Walter  Coven,  Para- 
mount shipper,  quit  to  become  draftsman 
with  Dow  Chemical  Co.  in  atomic  plant  near 
Denver.  . . . Edna  .Yhlers,  Paramount  con- 
tract clerk,  on  tw-o  to  three-week  leave  on 
doctor’s  orders.  . . . Dick  Fulham,  20th-Fox 
branch  manager,  to  N.  Y.  for  sales  meeting. 

. . . Bus  Amato,  20th-Fox  booker,  promoted 
to  salesman,  taking  post  vacated  when  Dick 
Fulham  w'as  promoted  to  manager  two 
months  ago.  Booking  spot  goes  to  Thos. 
Parr,  Jr.,  shipper,  with  assistant  shipper 
Chick  Lloyd,  independent  distributor,  setting 
up  exchange  at  820  21st  St.,  naming  it  Apex 
Films.  . . . Furniture  and  family  of  Phil 
Isaacs,  Paramount  division  manager,  arrive 
from  Washington.  They  have  bought  a 
home  here.  . . . For  his  daughter’s  second 
birthday  party,  Charles  Weber,  Paramount 
exchange  screening  room  projectionist,  en- 
tertained her  friends  at  a short  subject 
screening. 

DES  MOINES 

Mildred  Davis  of  the  Universal  exchange, 
spent  a recent  weekend  in  Kansas  City  with 
friends.  . . . Wilma  Frace,  an  inspectress  at 
Universal,  was  on  the  sick  list.  . . . Stanley 
•Soderberg,  a Warner  salesman,  visited 
friends  and  relatives  in  Minneapolis.  . . . 
Thelma  Washburn  of  RKO  is  enjoying  a 
vacation  in  Florida  these  cold  days,  and  in 
her  absence.  Bill  Burke,  company  auditor,  is 
working  at  the  Des  Moines  exchange  as 
booker.  . . . Mai  Pugh,  also  of  RKO,  spent 
some  time  recently  in  South  Dakota  with 
his  parents.  . . . Phil  Izaacs,  Paramount  dis- 


trict manager,  visited  the  exchange  recently. 

. . . Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Farrell,  exhibi- 
tors from  Scranton,  paid  Film  Row  a visit 
last  week.  . . . Mrs.  David  Sternberg  of 
Memphis,  Tenn.,  was  a house  guest  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  A.  H.  Blank.  . . . Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jack  Kennedy  (.'Mlied  Artists)  and  daugh- 
ter, Jacqueline,  are  vacationing  on  the  west 
coast.  . . . Members  of  Variety  Club  re- 
cently installed  equipment  for  the  showing 
of  CinemaScope  pictures  at  Mercy  Hospital 
auditorium.  Since  the  gift  was  made,  the 
Sisters  who  gather  from  all  convents  in  the 
city  for  monthly  and  bi-monthly  showing  of 
specially  selected  pictures,  have  seen  and  en- 
joyed films. 

DETROIT 

The  long  drought  of  newspaper  advertis- 
ing space  continues  to  affect  exhibitors  in 
Detroit.  Sol  Krim,  who  has  done  widespread 
advertising  for  his  Krim  in  Highland  Park, 
has  discontinued  booking  first  run  films. 
Krim  reports  that  patronage  has  hit  a low 
of  50  at  times.  . . . Walter  Stevenson,  Times 
film  writer,  writing  for  the  Reporter,  ac- 
cused producers  of  withholding  prime  prod- 
uct because  of  lack  of  promotional  facilities. 
This,  said  Stevenson,  kept  grade-A  pictures 
out  of  Detroit  while  they  were  being  shown 
in  Toledo,  Lansing,  Iron  Mountain  and 
other  outlying  cities.  . . . First  of  the  spring- 
time openings  w.as  announced  by  Walled 
Lake  Drive-In  Theatre  Corp.,  which  will 
open  its  new  lot  early  in  ’56.  Ted  Rogvoj' 
designed,  Dick  Roach  and  Norman  Stock- 
me)"er  will  operate.  . . . A1  Ackerman,  owner 
of  the  Eastside,  died  at  49.  . . . Local  199, 
LA.TSE,  elected  Dwight  Erskine  president. 
Retiring  president,  Gilbert  Light,  was 
elected  business  agent.  . . . “Fracture  Fri- 
days” is  the  name  of  the  newly  formed 
Friday  night  party  series  to  be  thrown  by 
the  Detroit  Variety  Club.  . . . Pontiac  drive- 
in  owner,  Elton  Samuels,  has  disposed  of 
his  restaurant  business. 

HARTFORD 

Eric  A.  Johnston,  president  of  the  MPAA, 
will  address  the  Jan.  25  session  of  the 
Springfield  (Mass.)  Public  Forums  at 
Springfield  Technical  High  School  Audi- 
torium. The  program  is  entitled  “The  Near 
East — Dilemma  and  Challenge.”  . . . Ernest 
A.  Grecula,  formerly  advertising  and  pub- 
licity director  of  the  Hartford  Theatre  Cir- 
cuit, has  become  a sales  representative  in 
Connecticut  for  Alexander  Film  Company. 
. . . Atty.  Steven  E.  Perakos,  of  Perakos 
Theatre  As.sociates,  New  Britain,  has  been 
named  to  the  board  of  corporators  of  tlie 
New  Britain  General  Hospital.  . . . Henry 
Lamoureux  and  Edward  Guilbeault  have 
taken  over  the  long-dark  Moosup  theatre, 
Moosup,  Conn.,  that  town’s  only  motion  pic- 
ture theatre.  The  new  management  team  is 
running  evening  performances  Mondays 
through  Fridays,  with  matinees  on  week- 
ends. . . . Sam  Germaine,  20th-Fox  salesman 
in  Connecticut,  and  Airs.  Germaine,  are 
marking  their  40th  wedding  anniversary.  . . . 
Morris  Keppner  and  Lou  Lipman,  partners 
in  the  Mansfield  fConn.)  drive-in,  are  plan- 
ning increased  playground  facilities  this 
spring. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

The  Fox  Theatre  at  La  Porte,  closed  for 
two  years,  was  reopened  Dec.  30  by  the  In- 
diana-Illinois  Theatre  Corp.,  with  Jack 


Lightner  as  manager.  . . . Walter  H.  Weil, 
61,  owner  of  the  Weil  theatre  at  Greenfield, 
died  there  Dec.  30.  . . . Del  Buckley  has  re- 
signed as  office  manager  at  Columbia  here 
to  go  to  Canada.  . . . Bob  Conn,  retiring 
chief  barker  of  Indianapolis  Tent  No.  10  of 
V'ariety,  was  presented  with  a caddy  cart 
at  the  club’s  combined  New  Year’s-installa- 
tion  party.  . . . John  B.  Stoneburner,  85,  who 
opened  the  first  movie  house  in  Decatur  in 
1905,  died  at  Decatur  Dec.  29.  . . . Earl 
Cunningham,  general  manager  of  the  Foun- 
tain Square,  has  returned  from  a vacation 
in  Florida.  . . . The  holiday  boom  is  business 
is  continuing  here,  with  New  Year’s  week 
attractions  in  all  four  of  the  big  first  run 
houses  holding  over. 

JACKSONVILLE 

Charlie  T.  Jordan  opened  the  new  Howco 
Exchange  branch  office  on  Bay  Street,  with 
Claude  Atkinson  and  Mrs.  Evelyn  Hazouri 
as  bookers.  . . . Elizabeth  Davis  is  now  sec- 
retary to  Tom  Sawyer,  FST  booker.  . . . Ex- 
hibitors here  included  E.  J.  Chalhub,  West 
Palm  Beach;  E.  C.  Kaniaris,  St.  Augustine 
Beach ; Carl  Floyd  and  Jack  Fitzwater, 
Floyd  Theatres,  Haines  City;  Jerry  Fender, 
Brunswick,  Ga. ; and  Tommy  Mullinax, 
Palatka.  . . . “Snake”  Richardson  came  in 
from  the  Capitol  Releasing  Corp.  office  in 
Atlanta.  . . . WOMPI  members  were  hard 
at  work  selling  tickets  for  a St.  Valentine’s 
charity  dance  at  the  Women’s  Club.  . . . Both 
John  Allen  and  Bob  Camp,  MGM  salesmen, 
are  fathers  to  new  baby  daughters.  . . . Betty 
Jean  Sierens  has  resigned  from  the  U-I  staff. 
. . . Dixon  “Dick”  Regan,  Paramount  office 
manager,  has  gone  on  the  road  as  a Para- 
mount salesman  and  Walter  Mock,  former 
booker,  has  replaced  him.  . . . Judson  Moses, 
MGM  publicist  from  Atlanta,  was  here  to 
work  on  the  Florida  premiere  of  “Ransom !” 
at  the  Florida  theatre. 

LOS  ANGELES 

The  holiday  season  saw  a number  of  ex- 
hibitors and  their  families  taking  off  for  dis- 
tant vacation  spots.  Among  those  leaving 
the  city  were  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Berman  of 
the  .\laddin  Theatres,  who  spent  the  Yuletide 
in  Mexico  City.  . . . Ray  Olmstead,  Arizona 
circuit  operator,  reported  that  his  son  Pete, 
became  the  father  of  a baby  boy  who  also 
was  given  the  name  of  Pete.  . . . Glimpsed 
on  the  Row  after  having  undergone  a foot 
operation,  was  Roy  Lemucchi,  who  operates 
theatres  in  Bakersfield.  . . . Film  Row’s  sym- 
pathy went  to  Frank  Prince,  Fox  West 
Coast  real  estate  department  head,  on  the 
death  of  his  father.  . . . Charles  Tarbox,  who 
recently  acquired  the  Carmel  theatre  from 
National  Theatres,  has  withdrawn  from  the 
Exhibitors  Service,  and  will  henceforth 
handle  his  own  booking  and  buying.  . . . 
Back  at  his  desk  after  a recent  illness  was 
Tom  Muchmore,  who  operates  theatres  in 
Los  Angeles  and  Canoga  Park.  ...  In  town 
on  business  were  Lloyd  Katz,  of  the  Sperling 
Theatres.  Las  Vegas;  George  Diamos,  Tri- 
Delta  Theatres,  Arizona;  and  Joe  Mark- 
owitz, Encinitas. 

MEMPHIS 

First  run  attenrlance  was  slow  during  the 
Christmas-New  Year  holiday  but  hit  new 
highs  as  1956  went  into  its  second  week.  . . . 
It  was  the  first  time  in  many  months  that 

(Continued  on  opposite  page) 


40 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14,  1956 


{Continued  from  opposite  page) 

all  five  first  runs  did  above  average  business. 
. . . Memphis  is  operating  without  any  movie 
censorship  of  any  kind  and  has  no  censor 
board  for  the  first  time  in  27  years.  Terms 
of  censors  expired  Jan.  1.  . . . J.  C.  Cox, 
manager  of  Capitol,  Union  City,  died  at 
Baptist  Hospital  in  Memphis  at  the  age  of 
38.  . . . R.  L.  (Bob)  Bostick,  National  Thea- 
tre Supply,  attended  the  Cotton  Bowl  game 
at  Dallas  New  Year’s  Day  and  has  returned. 
. . . Prof.  W.  C.  Handy,  daddy  of  the 
“Blues,”  a native  of  Memphis,  has  been  seri- 
ously ill  in  a New  York  hospital. 

MIAMI 

Lee  Ruwitch,  executive  vice-president  and 
general  manager  of  WTVJ,  announced  the 
television  station  for  the  sixth  year  will 
again  televise  the  Hialeah  Stake  Races 
starting  with  the  Inaugural  January  17,  the 
opening  day.  . . . Edmund  Reek,  producer 
of  sports  shorts  for  Fox-Movietone  News, 
was  in  the  area  recently  eyeing  the  Fontaine- 
bleau pool  for  the  February  shooting  in  Cin- 
emaScope  of  Olympic  champions  in  a diving 
and  swimming  short.  . . . NBC’s  Steve  Allen 
was  at  the  Saxony  for  the  January  9 stanza 
of  “Tonight,”  tieing  in  with  the  hotel’s  birth- 
day. . . . Jack  Weiner  of  Loew’s  MGM,  was 
due  in  for  another  visit  to  work  on  prelim- 
inary promotion  for  “I’ll  Cry  Tomorrow.” 

. . . L^A’s  southern  representative  Addie 
Addison  was  thumping  double  drums  for 
both  “Indian  Fighter”  and  “Man  with  the 
Golden  Arm.”  . . . Earl  Rowlands,  manager 
of  the  Boulevard,  reports  a new  assistant, 
Clarence  Tippin. 

MILWAUKEE 

Joe  Imhof,  branch  manager  at  United 
Artists,  has  left  for  a rest  in  Tucson,  Ari- 
zona. . . . New)  booker  at  the  Columbia  ex- 
change is  Carl  Krasnay.  . . . Delft  has  again 
taken  over  the  booking  for  the  Door  and 
Donna  theatres  at  Sturgeon  Bay,  Wise.  . . . 
Jerry  Gruenberg,  buyer  for  Gran  Enter- 
prises, on  Christmas,  went  to  be  with  his 
father  on  his  80th  birthday  in  Los  Angeles. 
Mr.  Gruenberg’s  secretary,  Jean  Goddkind, 
spent  New  Year’s  in  New  York.  . . . Co- 
lumbia’s “Picnic”  will  open  at  the  Warner 
theatre  here  February  24,  it  was  announced 
by  Harry  Olshan,  branch  manager.  . . . L. 
F.  Gran  almost  bowled  a perfect  score  at 
the  recent  Christmas  party  held  at  Oriental 
Bowling  Alleys. 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Theatre  business  in  Minneapolis  has  def- 
initely picked  up  with  six  houses  reporting 
“better  than  average”  grosses — the  first  time 
this  has  happened  in  several  months.  . . . 
Sam  Idelkope,  former  Paramount  booker,  is 
the  new  salesman  at  Allied  Artists,  replac- 
ing Avron  Rosen  who  joined  Buena  Vista. 

. . . LaVerne  Hagel,  bookers  clerk  at  MGM, 
is  engaged  to  Ralph  Zachman  of  Monticello, 
•Minn.  . . . Elsie  Linwall,  stenographer,  and 
Jeanette  Haus,  stenographer,  are  new  at 
Warner  Brothers.  ...  A children’s  theatre 
where  parents  can  leave  children  while  shop- 
ping will  be  included  in  the  new  Northbrook 
Shopping  Center  expansion  now  underway 
in  suburban  Brooklyn  Center.  . . . The  new 
slate  of  officers  of  the  Variety  Club  of  the 
Northwest,  headed  by  Sim  Heller,  president, 
was  installed  this  week  at  a dinner  at  the 
Nicollet  hotel.  . . . The  former  Scenic,  Tyler, 


Minn.,  has  been  reopened  by  William  Jensen 
under  the  name  of  Bill’s  theatre.  . . . Cinema- 
Scope  has  been  installed  in  the  Capitol  thea- 
tre at  Bismarck,  N.  D.  House  has  been  re- 
modeled and  redecorated  also. 

NEW  ORLEANS 

Will  Conrad  has  closed  the  Scott,  Scott, 
La.,  for  an  indefinite  period.  . . . The  Fa- 
mous, previously  under  the  management  of 
United  Theatres,  January  1 started  operating 
under  the  new  ownership  of  Famous  Thea- 
tre, Inc.  with  Rene  Brunet  as  president  and 
general  manager.  Their  first  attraction  fea- 
tured “Sincerely  Yours”  chalking  up  excep- 
tionally good  business.  . . . Byron  Adams, 
branch  manager  of  U.A.’s  Atlanta  exchange, 
was  a visitor  here  over  the  New  Year’s  holi- 
day to  attend  the  22nd  annual  Sugar  Bowl 
football  classic.  . . . John  Saunders,  south- 
eastern district  manager  of  Manley,  returned 
to  home  base  in  Memphis  after  a post  New 
Year’s  week  visit  here.  . . . Miss  Maud 
O’Brien,  New  Orleans  Times  Picayune- 
States  columnist,  will  grace  the  speaker’s 
table  at  the  WOMPI’s  luncheon  January  17, 
to  be  held  in  Room  A,  New  Orleans  Hotel. 

. . . Hodges  Theatre  Supply  handled  the  sale 
of  CinemaScope  equipment  and  the  large 
screen  which  they  also  installed  in  the 
Famous.  . . . Raymond  Gremillion,  of  South- 
eastern, reported  that  they  recently  com- 
pleted the  installation  of  CinemaScope  equip- 
ment in  the  leper  colony’s  two  theatres  in 
Carville,  La. 

OKLAHOMA  CITY 

“African  Lion”  is  showing  at  four  sub- 
urban theatres  in  Oklahoma  City  this  week. 

. . . The  regular  monthly  meeting  of  United 
Theatre  Owners  of  Oklahoma,  Inc.,  was  to 
be  held  January  9.  . . . Theatre  operator.s — in- 
cluding drive-ins — report  very  good  business 
during  the  holidays  due  to  the  mild  weather. 

. . . Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jerry  Barton  and  their 
baby  daughter  jSpent  the  holidays  in  Okla- 
homa City.  Mt.  Barton  is  the  son  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  R.  Lewis  Barton,  theatre  owners, 
and  lives  in  Washington,  D.  C.  . . . “Gone 
with  the  Wirjd”  has  been  brought  back  to 
the  Ritz  Theatre  in  Shawnee,  Okla. 

PHILADELPHIA 

The  Pennsylvania  State  Board  of  Motion 
Picture  Censors,  after  United  Artists  had 
censored  one  segment,  passed  “The  Man 
With  the  Golden  Arm,”  which  clearance 
was  virtually  automatic  since  the  local  courts 
forced  the  board  to  grant  its  seal  of  ap- 
proval to  “She  Shoulda  Said  No.”  . . . 
Victor  H.  Blanc,  former  chief  barker  of 
the  local  Variety  Club,  Tent  No.  13,  was 
named  chairman  of  the  Philadelphia  Com- 
mission for  the  establishment  of  a woodland 
in  the  State  of  Israel  in  honor  of  Gov.  and 
Mrs.  George  M.  Leader,  of  Pennsylvania. 

. . . Max  Bernstein,  Allied  Picture  repre- 
sentative, and  Marilyn  Cohen,  were  married 
last  week.  . . . Fire  destroyed  the  screen  and 
stage  curtains  at  William  Goldman’s  Strand, 
Pottstown.  Pa.  . . . Stockholders  meeting 
was  held  this  week  of  the  Allied  Motion  Pic- 
ture Theatre  Service,  Inc.,  of  which  Sidney 
E.  Samuelson  is  president.  . . . Dr.  Samuel 
Goldstein  is  offering  his  Paxtang  in  subur- 
ban Harrisburg.  Pa.,  for  sale  as  a result  of 
the  voters  turndown  of  Sunday  movies.  . . . 
Clifton  R.  Graeff',  projectionist  at  the  Rialto, 

(Continued  on  following  page) 


John 

Wayne 

is 

more 

John 

Wayne 

than 

ever 

in 


THE 

CONQUEROR 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14.  1956 


41 


{Cotitinued  from  preceding  page) 

Wilmington,  Del.,  became  the  father  of  a 
son.  . . . Gary  Chohany  was  promoted  as  as- 
sistant to  manager  W^illiam  Riding  at 
Loew’s,  Wilmington,  Del.  . . . Reading,  Pa., 
city  treasurer  reported  that  1955  amusement 
tax  receipts,  chiefly  from  mo\de  houses,  will 
be  much  below  the  total  for  1954.  Even  with 
better  business  in  December,  he  does  not  ex- 
pect to  reach  $135,000,  which  was  last  year’s 
total.  For  the  first  11  months  of  1955,  the 
receipts  were  only  $121,171.  . . . Francis  C. 
Kennedy,  after  being  fined  $50  and  costs, 
dropped  Sundays  from  the  operating  sched- 
ule of  his  Sinking  Springs  drive-in  near 
Reading,  Pa.,  and  continues  with  weekday 
showings  in  providing  patrons  with  in-car 
heaters. 

PITTSBURGH 

The  Stanley  has  acquired  “Rose  Tattoo” 
for  a late  January  date,  while  the  Penn  adds 
“Anything  Goes”  to  its  slate.  . . . Universal- 
International  sent  marriage  counselor  Helen 
R6se  here  for  interHews  anent  the  Fulton’s 
“There’s  Always  Tomorrow”.  . . . Fred  Mac- 
Murray  and  June  Haver  spent  a day  here 
plugging  MacMurray’s  movie,  “At  Gun- 
point”. . . . Lucille  Ball  and  Desi  Arnaz  due 
here  Feb.  2 to  plug  their  “Forever  Darling”. 
. . . The  Nixon  theatre,  Pittsburgh’s  sole 
legitimate  house,  and  which  switches  to  films 
on  Jan.  31  with  “Guys  and  Dolls,”  expects 
to  keep  the  Sam  Goldwyn  musical  for  a min- 
imum of  five  weeks.  . . . “The  Square 
Jungle”  has  been  added  to  the  Harris  fea- 
ture chart  later  this  month.  . . . Stanley 
Warner  district  managers  Henry  Burger, 
Bob  Bowman  and  Dick  Wright  along  with 
publicity  director  Phil  Katz  flew  to  New 
York  for  promotional  sessions  on  new  prod- 
uct. . . . Stanley  Warner  managerial  pro- 
motions and  shifts  find  Leopold  Satori  going 
from  the  Belmar  to  the  Rowland ; Reuben 
Harris  from  the  Strand  to  the  Belmar ; 
Marty  Gurowski  upped  to  manager  of  the 
Victor  in  McKeesport;  John  Zugeli  to  man- 
ager of  the  Strand;  Tom  Budjanec  to  the 
Washington,  and  Tom  Morris  to  the  Nittany 
in  Penn  State. 

PORTLAND 

First  run  business  is  sizzling  at  the  box 
office  with  all  first  run  houses  running 
strong  product  and  managers  putting  on  big 
campaigns.  . . . Marty  Foster,  Guild  theatre 
manager,  is  still  in  New  York  on  business. 
His  400-seat  house  is  getting  a complete 
facelifting.  Assistant  manager  Nancy  Welch 
is  carrying  on.  . . . Frank  Christy,  Ever- 


ATTENTION  SHOWMEN! 

BOOK  LIVE  STAGE  SHOWS 

Why  not  put  your  empty  stage  to. 
work  and  earn  extra  profits. 
Attractive  proposition  for 
CIRCUITS  * INDEPENDENTS 

COAST  TO  COAST  BOOKINGS 

Skews  for  mmf  six*  bodgot 

PULKOFF  THEATRICAL  AGENCY 

1560  Broadway 

(TsI.  JUdion  2-4037-S-9)  Nsw  York  36 


green  booker,  was  in  town  from  Seattle  for 
a few  days.  . . . Russ  Brown,  National  Thea- 
tres executive,  is  back  to  his  Los  Angeles 
office  after  spending  a week  here.  . . . Stubby 
Kaye  was  here  for  a couple  of  days  to  pub- 
licize “Guys  and  Dolls,”  now  in  a third  week 
at  the  Broadway.  . . . The  owner  of  the  de- 
luxe neighborhood  house,  the  Irvington,  just 
purchased  the  deluxe  neighborhood  Graep- 
er’s  Egyptian.  The  houses  are  about  a mile 
apart  and  ace  spots.  . . . Jack  Matlack  back 
to  work  after  a month’s  vacation  in  the 
Islands. 

PROVIDENCE 

Under  manager  Phil  Nemirow’s  personal 
supervision,  workmen  are  busily  engaged  in 
giving  the  RKO  Albee  a good  scrubbing. 
From  top  to  bottom,  the  popular  West- 
minster Street  house  presents  a dazzling 
clean  look.  Following  this,  a complete  paint- 
ing and  re-decorating  program  will  be 
started.  . . . Bill  Trambukis,  Loew’s  State 
manager,  was  recently  elected  publicity 
chairman  of  the  Junior  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce. He  has  also  been  appointed  a dele- 
gate to  the  national  convention  which  will 
be  held  in  Kansas  City,  next  May.  . . . Floyd 
FitzSimons  was  in  town,  handling  exploita- 
tion on  “Guys  and  Dolls”,  scheduled  for 
screening  at  the  Albee.  . . . Joe  Mansfield, 
UA  exploitation  man,  was  also  a recent 
visitor,  working  on  “Indian  Fighter”.  . . . 
Paul  McKenna  has  been  appointed  chief-of- 
service  at  Loew’s  State,  replacing  Robert 
Peterson  who  recently  resigned  to  enter 
another  field  of  business.  . . . Local  theatre- 
men  were  saddened  to  hear  of  the  death  of 
the  mother  of  Willard  Matthews.  A huge 
floral  offering  was  sent  by  the  houses. 
Matthews,  manager  of  the  Majestic,  is  cur- 
rently on  leave,  handling  the  Comerford  in- 
terests in  Scranton,  Pa.  . . . Employees  of 
Loew’s  presented  manager  Bill  Trambukis 
with  a beautiful  gold  watch,  as  a Christmas 
gift.  . . . Ralph  Rouse,  member  of  the  service 
staff  of  Loew’s,  who  was  severely  burned 
when  a boiler  exploded  in  his  home,  was 
back  after  a six-week  convalescence. 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

The  drying  and  repairing  of  the  projection 
and  sound  equipment  will  keep  the  Yuba 
City  drive-in  closed  for  two  months  time, 
Charles  Maestri,  general  manager  of  Lip- 
pert  theatres,  reports.  Despite  the  floods, 
the  drive-in  is  intact  structurally.  . . . George 
Mann,  Redwood  theatres,  says  the  three 
Eureka  theatres  are  being  supplied  by  spe- 
cial trucking  on  the  damaged  and  restricted 
Highway  101.  . . . With  telephone  service 
restored  to  storm  - isolated  communities, 
further  reports  of  damage  to  theatres  mount. 
Water  reached  the  center  of  the  screen  of 
Dave  William’s  River  theatre,  Guernieville. 

. . . The  Orrick  theatre,  Orrick,  and  the  Pic 
theatre.  Crescent  City  were  flooded  but  re- 
opened. . . . Extensive  renovation  is  planned 
for  the  Palo  Alto  drive-in,  Palo  Alto,  to 
repair  flood  damage.  . . . The  distributors  of 
the  area  were  commended  by  George  Mann 
for  their  response  to  the  challenge  of  the 
recent  “major  catastrophe”.  . . . Returning 
this  week  from  a three  months  trip  abroad 
were  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Walter  G.  Preddy.  He 
is  president  of  the  Walter  G.  Preddy  Equip- 
ment Co.  . . . Here  for  in-service  training 
with  the  local  Warner  Bros,  office  is  Sam 
.Schandrisidi  of  Thailand. 


ST.  LOUIS 

The  lease  on  the  Rosewood  theatre  at 
Rosewood  and  South  Lauderdale,  in  Mem- 
phis, Tenn.,  has  been  taken  over  by  Augus- 
tine J.  Clanciole  and  Mrs.  Clanciole.  They 
also  operate  the  Plaza,  the  Luciann  and  the 
Rosemary  in  Memphis.  . . . Mr.  and  Mrs. 
T.  R.  Lewis,  who  own  and  operate  the 
Park  theatre  between  the  Twin  Cities  of 
Marble  Hill,  Mo.,  and  Lutesville,  Mo.,  were 
hosts  recently  to  all  the  children  of  grade 
school  age  in  the  two  cities,  at  the  showing 
of  “The  Glass  Slipper”.  . . . The  Canton 
theatre  at  Canton,  Mo.,  took  a holiday  vaca- 
tion recently  and  was  closed  from  December 
20  to  Christmas  Day.  . . . The  50-year-old 
Crawford  theatre,  in  downtown  Wichita, 
Kan.,  is  to  be  torn  down  to  make  room  for 
a parking  lot.  Several  generations  of  theatre 
goers  patronized  the  show  house  to  see  the 
stars  of  bygone  days  in  action.  . . . Miss 
Garnet  Jane  Hunt,  daughter  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Garrett  Hobert  Hunt,  owners  of  the 
Hunt  theatre,  Doniphan,  Mo.,  was  to  be 
married  January  15  at  the  First  Baptist 
Church  in  Doniphan  to  Glenn  Edward 
White  of  Poplar  Bluff,  Mo.  Miss  Hunt  is 
booker  and  buyer  of  motion  pictures  for  the 
Hunt  theatre. 

VANCOUVER 

Basil  Orme  Nixon  has  been  appointed 
B.  C.  fire  marshal,  replacing  Bill  Walker 
who  retired  at  the  end  of  1955.  Nixon  joined 
the  fire  marshal’s  office  in  1942  as  assistant 
fire  marshal.  He  will  be  in  charge  of  thea- 
tres and  booth  equipment,  also  examinations 
for  projectionists.  . . . Sam  Eller ington,  vet- 
eran projectionist  at  the  Orpheum  and  a 
Canadian  Picture  Pioneer,  after  being  hos- 
pitalized for  a major  operation  is  recouping 
at  his  home.  . . . The  Park,  at  White  Rock 
in  the  Fraser  Valley,  and  the  300- seat 
Village,  at  Qualicum  Beach  on  Vancouver 
Island,  will  close  due  to  the  inroads  of  TV. 

. . . Bill  Campbell,  77,  former  drama  and 
movie  critic  of  the  Calgary  Albertan  and 
who  retired  to  live  in  Vancouver  in  1950, 
died  here  this  week.  . . . Jack  Donnelly,  of 
the  Strand  operating  staff,  has  left  for  a 
six-week  holiday  in  Mexico. 

WASHINGTON 

The  Bernheimer  Theatres  office  at  1311 
Rhode  Island  Ave.,  N.  E.  was  destroyed  by 
fire.  . . . Robert  Miller,  Universal  booker, 
is  the  father  of  a new  son.  . . . Father 
Hartke  of  Catholic  University,  and  a chap- 
lain of  the  Variety  Club,  returned  from  Los 
Angeles  where  he  attended  a convention  of 
the  American  Educational  Theatre  Associ- 
ation. . . . Mrs.  Clara  Lust,  of  Lust  Theatre 
Supply,  is  a grandmother  again.  Her  daugh- 
ter, Mrs.  Regina  Trupp,  gave  birth  to  a 
girl.  . . . The  Richmond  theatre,  Alexandria, 
is  being  redecorated.  . . . Recent  Washing- 
ton visitors  included  Phil  Isaacs,  former 
Paramount  branch  manager,  and  now  dis- 
trict manager  with  offices  in  Denver;  and 
Joe  Gins,  former  branch  manager  of  Univer- 
sal, and  now  district  manager  with  offices 
in  Boston.  . . . Sympathy  is  extended  to 
George  Dorsey  of  Warner  Pathe  News,  on 
the  death  of  his  mother,  Grace  M.  Dorsey, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  91.  . . . The  Vincent 
B.  Costello  Post,  American  Legion,  attended 
a showing  of  “Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell,”  at  the  Metropolitan  theatre. 
Mitchell  headed  the  post  in  1927. 


42 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14.  1956 


An  International  Association  of  Motion  Picture  Showmen — Walter  Brooks,  Director 


’Yhe  jftnftpttance  the  Theatre  in  the  ” 


CHARLES  A.  OWEN,  editor  of  the 
Logan  County  (Oklahoma)  News, 
told  residents  of  Crescent,  Oklahoma, 
recently,  that  they  were  on  the  verge  of 
losing  their  theatre — and  if  the  theatre  went, 
they  could  look  to  a gradual  deterioration  of 
their  town.  We  quote  this  well-spoken  piece 
from  Bob  Wile’s  Service  Bulletin  for  Inde- 
pendent Theatre  Owners  of  Ohio,  as  follows ; 

“I  hope  you  will  take  five  minutes  to  read 
this  piece;  one  minute’s  reading  time,  and 
four  minutes  to  think  it  over,”  he  pleads  with 
his  readers,  and  then  informs  them  that  un- 
less something  is  done  about  it,  the  town  will 
lose  its  theatre. 

“If  that  happens,  you  can  kiss  goodbye  to 
some  of  the  other  businesses  in  town,  and  if 
enough  of  them  are  forced  to  close,  you  can 
kiss  the  town  goodbye. 

“Perhaps  you  think  the  theatre  isn’t  im- 
portant to  your  community.  You  couldn’t  be 
more  wrong.  For  example,  look  at  our 
neighboring  town  of  Marshall,”  he  wrote. 

Owen  pointed  out  that  the  Marshall  Thea- 
tre closed  two  years  ago.  Since  then  about 
half  of  the  businesses  in  town  have  been 
forced  to  close.  The  only  drug  store  locked 
up  Saturday  night,  “and  when  your  town 
loses  its  drug  store,  you’ve  had  it.” 

Television  hurt  the  theatre  business  only 
temporarily,  he  told  his  subscribers,  and 
more  theatres  were  open  last  year  than  ever 
before.  Rural  folks  and  teenagers  have  been 
loyal  patrons  of  the  Ritz  Theatre,  which  Jess 
Jones  operates,  and  enough  of  them  have 
been  attending  to  allow  the  exhibitor  to 
almost  break  even  in  recent  weeks. 

“Then,  who  isn’t  attending?”  he  asks. 
“You  and  I and  the  rest  of  the  townfolk,  to 
whom  the  growth  or  failure  of  our  city 
means  more  than  anything  else. 

“In  fact,  if  all  the  movie  dollars  spent  by 
folks  in  the  Crescent  area  had  been  spent  at 
the  Ritz  last  month,  the  problem  would  not 
exist. 

“The  problem  is  immediate  ...  we  are 
open  to  suggestions  as  to  what  to  do  and 
how  to  do  it.  Let’s  don’t  wait  and  buy  our 
ticket  after  the  train  has  left. 


FILM  BUYERS  RATING 

We  wonder  how  many  of  our  good 
managers — there  are  more  members  of  the 
Round  Table  than  all  the  managers  em- 
ployed by  all  the  circuits  In  the  United 
States,  Canada  and  overseas — read  and 
study  the  preference  poll  which  is  posted 
each  week  in  the  Herald,  as  the  "Film 
Buyers  Rating"  of  current  films.  Last  week, 
for  Instance,  4,470  playdates  were  re- 
ported, to  cover  I 15  attractions. 

Here  is  a poll  to  eclipse  all  polls,  in 
audience  preference.  These  are  the  buyers 
speaking,  and  they  speak  with  authority, 
and  from  practical  experience.  No  fooling 
around  with  these  figures — for  the  Herald's 
editorial  policy  plays  no  favorites.  No 
theorists,  either,  nor  guessing  games.  Just 
a good  showman's  basic  report  on  the 
quality  ©f  the  pictures  he  has  played — 
graded  in  five  classifications  of  merit. 

Now  is  a good  time,  at  the  start  of  a 
new  year,  to  watch  these  totals.  Look  care- 
fully at  the  left-hand  column  of  figures, 
those  that  are  marked  "Excellent" — and 
look  again  at  the  far  right  column,  which 
are  marked  "Poor."  Study  the  other  grada- 
tions, and  see  for  yourself  how  your  fellows 
judge  current  film  product  on  their  own 
screens.  Decide  for  yourself  that  their 
conclusions  are  on  the  level. 

Here,  at  Quigley  Publications,  we  like  to 
level  with  managers  at  the  point  of  sale. 
The  point  is,  for  us,  that  the  Herald  is 
happy  in  the  consciousness  of,  and  respon- 
sibility to,  a good  name. 


“The  Ritz  has  CinemaScope,  widescreen 
and  most  of  the  other  advantages  offered  by 
a modern  theatre.  If  anything  else  is  needed, 
your  attendance  dollars  will  have  to  buy  it. 

“Jess  doesn’t  know  we  are  writing  this, 
and  may  not  even  approve.  But  we  refuse  to 
stand  idly  by  and  see  a vital  concern  lost 
when  so  little  effort  by  each  of  us  would 
spell  the  difference. 

“What  are  you  willing  to  do  about  it?” 


^ SEVENTEEN,  the  national  magazine 
devoted  to  the  young  girls  of  that  age,  has 
an  idea  which  we  are  watching  with  great 
interest.  They  have  created  a new  issue, 
“Seventeen-at-School”  and  the  copy  for 
January,  1956,  is  now  at  hand.  It  is  offered 
as  a guide  for  Junior  High  School  teachers 
who  have  classes  in  home  economics,  and 
for  students  in  this  age  bracket  it  provides  a 
series  of  guides  for  the  discussion  of  current 
entertainment  films.  The  sub-title  “Tonight 
at  the  Movies”  describes  a part  of  their  edu- 
cational program  for  home  and  family  living. 

For  instance,  in  this  first  issue,  Sigana 
Earle,  director  of  Homemaking  Education 
for  the  magazine,  discusses  “The  Court 
Jester”  which  was  Seventeen’s  January 
“Picture  of  the  Month,”  and  encourages 
round  table  discussion  of  motion  pictures  in 
general  as  part  of  the  school  program. 
■‘Youth  Looks  at  Life”  and  Hollywood’s 
contribution  to  “Million  Dollar  Visual  Aids” 
are  directed  to  home  economics  teachers  as 
suggestive  material  in  classroom  use  for 
community  benefits. 

“Seventeen’s”  new  publication  compares 
somewhat  in  purpose  and  style  with  the 
long-established  “Study  Guide”  which  is 
prompted  by  the  Motion  Picture  Association. 
But  it  goes  a step  farther  and  with  more 
spread. 

Q AARON  NADELL,  well  known  in  the 
industry,  has  written  a fine  handbook  which 
should  be  owned  by  every  good  theatre  man- 
ager and  may  be  obtained  from  the  Quigley 
Bookshop.  It  is  called  “The  Master  Guide 
to  Theatre  Maintenance”  and  is  a compre- 
hensive outline  in  the  selection  and  use  of 
methods,  devices  and  supplies  for  attracting, 
selling  and  entertaining  patrons,  and  for 
keeping  the  theatre  comfortable,  sanitary 
and  appealing  to  the  eye.  It  is  published  by 
the  author,  and  the  price  is  $5  per  copy.  We 
recommend  it  as  a book  of  knowledge  that 
you  can  keep  close  to  your  conduct  and  man- 
agement of  motion  picture  theatres,  in  these 
days  of  transition,  and  the  necessity  of  fight- 
ing for  perfection.  — Walter  Brooks 


MANAGERS'  ROUND  TABLE  SECTION,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


43 


Sam  Gilman,  manager  of  Loew's  State  theatre,  Syracuse, 
had  a stage  display  to  be  proud  of,  using  cut-out  figures 
of  choirboys  in  a Christmas  setting,  nicely  decorated  and 
lighted  to  plant  the  proper  spirit  tor  the  holiday  season.  We 
like  it  so  well  that  we  think  others  should  remember  how 
effective  this  display  proved  to  be,  following  a good 
manager's  best  instinct  for  good  showmanship,  in  good  taste. 


Three  harem  beauties  and  a strolling  troubadour  sang 
praises  of  "Kismet"  as  street  ballyhoo  for  the  benefit  of 
Loew’s  State  theatre,  St.  Louis,  Mo.  And  they  certainly 
looked  intriguing  as  a come-on  for  this  musical  extravaganza. 


Len  Bishop,  manager  of  Shea's  theatre,  Toronto, 
and  Tiff  Cook,  of  Famous  Players-Canadlan's 
exploitation  staff,  were  working  partners  In  this 
promotion  for  RKO's  "Treasure  of  Pancho  Villa" — 
using  a well-worn  device,  the  treasure  chest  with 
sponsored  gifts  for  those  who  were  lucky. 


Working 

Partners 


Harry  Haustein,  manager  of  the  Paramount 
theatre,  Seattle,  had  the  good  fortune  to  obtain 
some  original  costumes  from  the  studio,  and  local 
models  to  wear  them,  in  a partnership  deal  to 
promote  "Artists  and  Models" — with  the  coopera- 
tion of  a modeling  agency. 


44 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


SL 


owmen  in 


^^ctlon 


Neatest  trick  of  the  week  was  worked  by 
Harry  Botwick,  district  manager  for  Florida 
States  Theatres  in  Miami,  when  he  applied 
for  a “Special  Tax  Return — for  Wagering” 
in  the  name  of  Nathan  Detroit,  who  will  be 
identified  as  a character  in  “Guys  and  Dolls” 
— playing  at  the  Florida  and  Colony  thea- 
tres. He  was  so  identified  by  the  Internal 
Revenue  Service,  and  the  return  was  denied 
officially,  although  Nathan  operates  “the 
oldest  established,  permanent  floating  crap 
game” — in  the  picture.  But  the  stunt  hit  the 
front  pages  in  Miami  newspapers  and  went 
out  as  a wire  story  to  Associated  Press 
throughout  the  country  ! 

▼ 

Sol  Schocker,  general  manager  of  the 
Super  Skyway  Drive-in,  West  End  Drive-in 
and  Franklin  theatres,  in  Allentown,  Pa., 
says  he  gets  the  Herald  every  week  at  his 
home  address,  and  conducts  many  ticket- 
selling promotions,  which  will  be  entered 
for  the  Quigley  Awards. 

▼ 

Russ  McKibbin,  manager  of  the  Imperial 
theatre,  Toronto,  and  Tiff  Cook  were  both 
cooking  with  gas  for  the  exploitation  of 
“Artists  and  Models”.  Russ  had  a female 
artist  and  sixteen  models  in  the  window  of 
a men’s  wear  shop,  attracting  more  attention 
than  anything  along  Yonge  Street,  with 
alternate  plugs  for  all  concerned. 

T 

Morris  Rosenthal,  fighting  for  his  share 
of  the  public’s  amusement  dollar  with  “The 
Indian  Fighter”  at  Loew’s  Poll  theatre.  New 
Haven,  and  Kirk  Douglas  in  person,  sans 
whiskers,  following  his  recent  public  shave 
on  television,  to  talk  to  the  press. 

T 

The  national  Catholic  magazine.  The  Sign, 
lauds  RKO’s  color  film,  “Naked  Sea”,  as  a 
picture  with  exciting  moments,  visually  stir- 
ring scenes,  a good  deal  of  interest  for  every 
age.  The  film  is  documentary,  and  concerns 
deep-sea  tuna  fishing  off  the  coasts  of  Pan- 
ama, Equador  and  the  Galapagos  Islands. 

▼ 

Bill  Lavery  had  an  extensive  campaign 
for  the  New  Year’s  opening  of  “The  Court 
Martial  of  Billy  Mitchell”  at  Schine’s  Os- 
wego theatre,  Oswego,  N.  Y.  He  obtained 
the  full  cooperation  of  the  U.S.  Air  Force, 
and  the  squad  cars  covered  the  city  for  ten 
days  in  advance,  with  posters  and  promotion 
for  the  picture. 

▼ 

The  Carver  Theatre,  Washington,  D.  C. 
will  start  the  New  Year  with  the  “Brown 
Brevities  Revue” — with  seventeen  people, 
and  the  Waldorf  Theatre,  Waldorf,  Md.,  will 
have  “Wild  Bill  Hickok”  and  his  western 
revue,  as  a stage  attraction.  The  tendency 
to  stage  talent  and  “Late  Ramble”  shows  is 
part  of  the  local  answer  to  higher  admission 
prices.  Ike  Weiner  and  Ted  Megaarden  are 
operators  of  the  theatres. 


The  Ponca  City  News  carries  a big  dis- 
play ad  for  the  gala  reopening  of  the  Pon- 
can  theatre,  where  Don  R.  Hall  is  the 
manager.  They  picked  the  night  before 
Christmas  for  the  premiere  of  the  newly 
decorated  theatre,  with  open  house  from  2 
until  5 p.m.  and  with  “Artists  and  Models” 
as  the  attraction. 

T 

James  A.  Duncan,  manager  of  the  23rd 
Street  Drive-In,  Chattanooga,  Term.,  had  a 
12-foot  cut-out  Santa  Claus  and  assorted 
cartoon  characters  in  proportionate  sizes,  as 
outdoor  display  for  the  Christmas  season. 
Looks  fine  in  a photograph  for  our  picture 
page.  We  met  Jim  last  year  in  Altanta  at 
the  convention. 

▼ 

Joe  De  Victoria,  publicist  for  the  Golden 
Gate  theatre,  had  a good  story  in  the  San 
Francisco  Chronicle  when  he  advertised  for 
a live  tarantula — and  we’ve  just  received  the 
press  clippings.  Got  fifty  times  more  than 
classified  space,  with  a picture  of  “Little 
Joe” — and  the  explanation  that  “the  SPCA 
doesn’t  need  to  worry,  we  feed  him  larvae, 
and  we  even  feed  the  larvae  !”  All  good  pub- 
licity for  that  big  “Tarantula”  from  Univer- 
sal-International that  is  breaking  box  office 
records. 

T 

We’re  glad  to  note  the  world  premiere  on 
February  7th  of  MGM’s  new  picture  star- 
ring Lucille  Ball  and  Desi  Arnez,  “Forever 
Darling”  at  Dipson’s  Palace  theatre,  James- 
town, N.  Y.,  which  is  Lucille’s  birthplace — 
and  good  enough  reason  for  a civic  holiday. 
This  Round  Table  always  applauds  pre- 
mieres at  the  local  level,  especially  in  small 
cities  and  towns  where  the  impact  is  better 
for  all  parties  concerned. 


Smiling  broadly  of  the  turnout  for  the 
opening  of  "Guys  and  Dolls"  at  Florida 
State's  newly  reopened  Co/ony  theatre  on 
Lincoln  Road,  Miami  Beach,  are  Harry  Bot- 
wick, district  manager  for  the  circuit,  and 
B.  S.  Pulley,  one  of  the  stars  of  the  show. 

Boyd  Fry,  manager  of  Loew’s  Grand  thea- 
tre, Atlanta,  had  a strikingly  beautiful  Na- 
tivity scene  as  a display  during  Christmas 
with  the  appreciation  of  his  patrons. 

T 

Kenneth  Rogers,  manager  of  the  41  Drive- 
In,  five  miles  south  of  Macon,  Ga.,  on  Route 
41,  says  he  has  long  been  a reader  of  the 
Round  Table,  but  that  he  never  applied  for 
his  membership  card  until  now,  so  he  is  con- 
sidered in,  with  the  prospect  that  he  will 
now  contribute  to  this  reciprocal  exchange 
of  showmanship. 

T 

Bob  Walker  sends  us  a current  copy  of 
our  favorite  small  town  newspaper,  tlie 
Fruita,  Colorado,  Times,  and  we  see  that 
the  Ford  Foundation  gets  the  front  page  for 
a grant  of  $10,000  to  the  Lower  Valley 
Hospital,  which  is  all  to  the  good.  But  Bob’s 
own  contribution  is  a news  story  to  the  effect 
that  patrons  of  the  Uintah  Theatre  don’t 
agree  with  the  National  Audience  Poll,  and 
they  say  so,  with  emphasis.  It’s  difference 
of  opinion  that  makes  horse  racing,  and 
audience  polls  popular,  and  newsworthy. 


Virgil  Galotta,  manager  of  the  Wilson  theatre,  Arlington,  Vo.,  is  awarded  the  $100 
prize  for  his  campaign  on  "Love  Me  or  Leave  Me"  in  the  Neighborhood  Theatre  managers" 
incentive  drive.  Here  he  is  surrounded  by  MGM  salesman  Tom  Cosgrove,  Joe  Kronman, 
office  manager  of  MGM's  Washington  branch,  and  at  right,  Cal  Bain,  another  of  MGM's 
sales  staff  who  applaud  such  winners  and  help  with  the  incentive. 


MANAGERS'  ROUND  TABLE  SECTION,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


4S 


Texas  Compo  Opens 
Full  Year  Program 


Kyle  Korex,  executive  director  of  Texas 
Compo.  a cousin  once  removed  from  the 
National  Council  of  Motion  Picture  Organi- 
zations. has  announced  a series  of  four  par- 
ticipation-promotion programs,  one  in  each 
quarter  of  1956,  which  have  been  created  and 
designed  to  sell  motion  pictures  to  the  pub- 
lic. and  to  stimulate  ticket  sales  at  the  box 
office.  This  is  in  line  with  Texas  Compo’s 
constructive  policy  of  business  building,  in 
addition  to  their  usual  duties  to  Texas  ex- 
hibitors. The  four  campaigns  have  been  pre- 
pared for  the  Lone  Star  State,  but  will  be 
available  to  every  theatre  manager  through- 
out the  world,  by  direct  arrangement  witli 
the  Texas  headquarters. 

Ticket  Selling  Ideas 
For  Every  Quarter 

During  the  first  quarter  (January,  Febru- 
ary and  ^larch)  the  famous  “Oscar  Race” 
whicli  originated  in  Texas  will  be  con- 
ducted. In  previous  years  this  contest  has 
been  enormously  successful,  and  is  repeated 
by  popular  demand.  It  is  a plan  to  permit 
theatre  patrons  to  participate  in  the  annual 
Acadeni}'  Awards  by  attempting  to  select 
the  “Oscar”  winner  in  each  of  six  categories. 
Prizes  are  sponsored  or  consist  of  theatre 
tickets.  Last  year  a survey  proved  that  the 
“Oscar  Race”  increased  business  by  as  much 
as  21%  in  many  theatres. 

In  the  second  quarter  (April,  May  and 
June)  the  “Teacher  of  the  Year”  will  be 
selected  by  popular  vote  in  each  town  or 
neighborhood  and  the  local  theatre  will  pay 
tribute  to  the  indispensable  teaching  profes- 
sion. The  balloting  will  require  the  support 
and  particpation  of  all  students,  although  the 
voting  is  also  open  to  the  public,  with  the 
students  electioneering  for  their  favorites. 
This  campaign  has  been  tested  by  the  Phil 
Isley  circuit — and  they  should  know,  because 
Mr.  Isley’s  daughter  is  better  known  as 
Jennifer  Jones,  and  she  was  “Good  Morning, 
Miss  Dove” — which  glorified  teachers. 

Proven  Plans  Are 
Put  Back  Again 

Drive-In  Theatre  operation  will  be  fea- 
tured in  the  third  quarter  (July,  August  and 
September)  and  cash  prizes  will  be  awarded 
to  drive-in  owners  and  managers  who  turn 
in  the  best  campaigns  for  “Drive-In  Theatre 
Week”  in  this  period.  Due  to  the  over- 
whelming success  of  this  plan  last  year,  it 
will  be  elaborated,  and  the  23rd  Anniversary 
of  Drive-In  theatres  will  be  celebrated  dur- 
ing the  first  week  in  July.  To  properly  focus 
attention,  the  special  package  of  promotion 
materials  may  be  obtained,  as  in  other  cam- 
paign’s direct  from  Mr.  Rorex’s  office  in 
iJallas,  for  use  elsewhere  than  in  Texas. 


In  the  final  quarter  of  the  year  (October, 
November  and  December)  Kyle  Rorex 
establishes  a Manager’s  Award  as  another 
annual  feature  in  ticket-selling  enterprise.  A 
theatre  manager  simply  selects  a picture 
after  September  30th  which  he  personally 
endorses  and  guarantees  to  his  patrons  as 
good  entertainment,  and  then  proceeds  to 
sell  that  idea  to  prove  his  capacity  as  a 
showman.  The  personal  endorsement  is  part 
of  the  plan,  and  must  be  put  up  in  each  origi- 
nal campaign  as  the  key  to  this  particular 
selling  approach.  The  campaign  materials 
have  all  been  provided,  including  two  trail- 
ers, a 40x60  displa}q  a composite  mat,  radio, 
TV  and  other  newspaper  publicity.  Kyle 
Rorex  does  an  exceptional  job,  and  proves 
the  value  and  intrinsic  worth  of  things  that 
grow  in  Texas,  all  big  in  size  and  ’Scope. 


Showmen  In  Action 

That  old  promotion  spirit  is  a long  way 
from  being  dead.  With  gift  books  register- 
ing NO  SALE  at  the  box-office  of  Schine’s 
Hipp  theatre,  Corbin,  Ky.,  manager  Lou 
Merenbloom  hit  the  road — and  sold  $120 
worth  by  calling  on  his  local  trade.  Shows 
what  a little  git-up-and-git  will  do. 


The  Ben  Poblockis — "Ben,  Eddie,  Barney, 
Ray,  Jerry,  Jim  and  Bill” — which  is  a family 
to  admire,  sent  out  a circular  letter  over 
his  signature  as  manager  of  the  Plaza  thea- 
tre, Burlington,  Wisconsin,  complimenting 
children  on  their  good  behavior  in  the  past 
year,  taking  good  care  of  the  nice  improve- 
ments which  were  made  in  1954,  and  for 
which  both  management  and  patrons  may  be 
grateful. 


Broadway  Comes  to 
Green  Bay,  Wis. 

Elmer  Brennan,  northern  district  manager 
for  Standard  Theatres,  Milwaukee,  is  co- 
operating with  the  Concert-Drama  Associa- 
tion of  Green  Bay,  Wisconsin,  in  bringing  a 
series  of  five  performances,  including  both 
Broadway  stage  and  television  shows,  to  the 
Bay  Theatre,  operated  by  the  film  circuit. 
The  series  is  called  the  Winter  Theatre  and 
a ticket  sale  is  maintained  in  the  theatre 
lobby,  with  both  mail  and  telephone  orders 
for  reservations.  The  first  two  attractions 
have  been  Ed  Sullivan  and  his  “Toast  of  the 
Town”  program,  and  Guy  Lombardo’s  Royal 
Canadians.  The  series  which  was  made 
possible  because  of  the  interest  shown  by 
those  living  in  Green  Bay  and  ten  nearby 
communities,  has  brought  the  Bay  Theatre 
to  the  attention  of  thousands  and  has  gone 
far  to  recapture  that  “lost  audience”  at  the 
local  level. 


Gets 

Blue  Gruss 
Brewniere 

RKO’s  new  David  Butler  picture,  “Glory”, 
starring  Margaret  O’Brien,  had  its  premiere 
on  January  11th,  at  the  Kentucky  theatre,  in 
Lexington,  where  Art  Stanisch,  good  Round 
Table  member  and  Quigley  Award  winner, 
is  resident  manager.  The  opening  sparked  a 
saturation  promotion  campaign  with  over 
200  playdates  in  the  vicinity  of  Kentucky’s 
Blue  Grass  areas,  including  the  greatest  TV, 
radio  and  exploitation  coverage  ever  ac- 
corded a motion  picture  in  that  section.  The 
entire  campaign  was  worked  out  under  the 
supervision  of  Dave  Cantor,  RKO’s  man- 
ager of  exploitation  in  New  York,  with  field- 
man  Hank  Howard  handling  Lexington, 
Louisville,  southern  Kentucky,  Indiana  and 
Ohio  bookings.  Ralph  Banghart  will  oper- 
ate between  Cincinnati  and  Indianapolis, 
with  A1  Margolian  working  out  of  Cleve- 
land and  all  converged  on  Lexington  and 
Louisville  for  the  final  days  of  the  campaign. 

4 he  City  of  Lexington  has  proclaimed 
Glory  Day”  and  the  200-piece  Universitv 
of  Kentucky  band  will  head  a parade  to 
welcome  Governor  Harry  Chandler,  and 
representatives  of  Calumet  Farms,  and  other 
famous  racing  stables  that  cover  this  Blue 
Grass  country.  Miss  O’Brien  will  act  as  a 
judge  in  a contest,  in  cooperation  with  a 
local  department  store  and  two  newspapers, 
to  find  four  beautiful  girls — the  trouble  being 
to  pick  only  four  in  that  State,  famous  for  its 
beauties.  The  Thoroughbred  Club  of  Amer- 
ica will  act  as  hosts  to  the  stars,  Margaret 
O’Brien,  Charlotte  Greenwood  and  Walter 
Brennan,  and  top  syndicate  sports  writers 
will  be  guests  of  the  Club. 


David  Treadway,  an  employee  of  the  Dun- 
can theatre,  Lnion,  S.  C.,  is  a new  member 
of  the  Round  Table,  and  he  sent  a niice 
Christmas  greeting  to  Martin  Quigley, 
which  was  appreciated  by  our  editor-in-chief 
and  publisher.  We  like  his  comments  on 
The  Herald,  and  what  he  refers  to  as 
“treasurable” — a nice  Southern  e.xpression. 

T 

Norm  Levinson  can  always  be  depended 
on  to  dig  up  something  new  and  pertinent 
to  the  picture  he  is  exploiting.  So  what  do 
you  think,  he  found  the  author  of  “The 
Tender  Trap”  right  there  in  Minneapolis, 
and  had  him  autographing  copies  of  his 
latest  book,  “A  Guide  to  Campus  Humor” 
for  attractive  co-eds. 

▼ 

From  half  way  around  the  world,  comes 
a letter  of  appreciation  from  R.  M.  Richards, 
manager  of  the  Majestic  theatre,  Melbourne, 
Australia,  for  the  citation  which  he  received 
in  the  second  quarter  of  1955  of  the  Quig- 
ley Awards  competition.  He  says  “These 
Awards  are  highly  valued,  and  further  cam- 
paigns are  being  prepared  for  submission 
in  other  quarterly  judgings.” 


46 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14,  1956 


^elilna 


ina  ^y^pp^oaci 


k 


THE  TROUBLE  WITH  HARRY  — Para- 
mount. VistaVision,  with  color  by  Techni- 
color. The  unexpected  from  Alfred  Hitch- 
cock. The  man  who  thrilled  you  with  "To 
Catch  a Thief"  and  "Rear  Window"  comes 
through  with  his  most  unusual  story  yet! 
Unexpected  romance!  Unexpected  comedy! 
Unexpected  suspense!  And  filmed  amid  all 
the  autumn  splendor  of  Vermont's  hills — 
more  colorful  than  anything  you've  ever 
seen  on  the  big  screen.  The  trouble  with 
Harry  was — that  he  was  dead,  and  wouldn't 
stay  buried!  Edmund  Gwenn,  John  For- 
sythe, Shirley  Maclaine  and  all  star  cast. 
24-sheet  and  all  posters  have  intriguing 
pictorial  art  for  your  lobby  and  marquee 
display.  Special  herald  keys  the  campaign 
with  the  best  sales  approach.  Newspaper 
ad  mats  in  a variety  of  styling,  to  sell 
Hitchcock,  to  sell  this  whimsical  comedy, 
and  to  sell  the  colorful  settings.  Small  space 
ads  are  provided  liberally,  with  some  ex- 
cellent big  ones,  especially  No.  408.  The 
complete  campaign  mat  Is  a real  bargain, 
furnishing  ten  ad  mats  and  slugs  and  two 
publicity  mats,  all  for  35c  at  National 
Screen.  Buy  these  composite  mats  on  stand- 
ing order,  and  take  the  whole  mat  to  your 
newspaper  office.  Don't  cut  it  up  yourself. 
Some  amusing  commercial  tieups,  featuring 
the  title  as  a cue  for  window  dressing.  The 
State  of  Vermont  has  pre-sold  this  picture 
in  cooperative  advertising.  There  are  some 
music  tieups  and  other  suggestions. 

• 

THE  INDIAN  FIGHTER— United  Artists. 

CinemaScope,  print  by  Technicolor.  The 
sweep  of  "Red  River"  — the  drama  of 
"High  Noon"  — the  violence  of  "Shane" 
and  now  the  might  of  Kirk  Douglas  In  this 
fighting,  loving  legend  of  the  frontier.  An- 
other western  that  will  prove  superior  en- 
tertainment In  our  new  dimensions.  24- 
sheet  and  other  posters  have  cut-out  art 
materials  to  use  in  your  own  way  as  lobby 
and  marquee  display.  Excellent  jumbo 
herald  from  Cato  Show  Print,  In  striking 
color,  with  one-half  of  the  back  page  blank 
for  your  Imprint  and  a cooperative  adver- 
tiser. Newspaper  ad  mats  in  large  sizes, 
and  some  that  are  small,  but  the  best  buy 
for  small  theatres  Is  the  composite  mat, 
whi  ch  h as  eight  one-  and  two-column  ad 
mats  and  slugs,  plus  two  publicity  mats,  all 
for  35c,  which  won't  buy  one  ordinary  mat 
sold  singly.  There  are  publicity  mats  of 
Elsa  Martinella,  new  Italian  actress,  that 
will  get  free  space  if  you  show  them  to  your 
newspaper  man.  (How  did  she  get  way  out 
west,  to  fight  Indians?  There  are  wolves 
In  New  York!)  Dell  Publishing  Company 
has  a comic  book,  available  on  newsstands. 
Indian  feather  headbands  and  similar  nov- 
elties are  offered  in  the  pressbook.  A set 
of  coior-glo  stills  will  help  you  sell  color 
with  color  in  a lobby  frame. 


THE  SECOND  GREATEST  SEX— Universal- 
International.  CinemaScope,  with  print  by 
Technicolor.  All  the  great  times,  the  great 
tunes,  the  wonderful  dancing  fun  of  those 
Kansas  calico  days — the  hilarious  history  of 
the  early  frontier.  Jeanne  Crain,  Kitty 
Kallen,  Mamie  Van  Doren,  Bert  Lahr.  Paul 
Gilbert  and  a big  cast,  in  a picture  that 
will  delight  all  the  folks  who  like  westerns — 
or  ever  did,  through  all  the  years.  This  is 
different,  and  any  resemblance  to  "Okla- 
homa!" Is  purely  coincidental.  It's  a grand 
opportunity  for  square  dancing  as  an  ex- 
ploitation aid — you  can  have  them  dancing 
In  the  streets  to  this  music.  And  we  com- 
pliment Universal  for  providing  two-color 
newspaper  ads,  for  such  as  Erv  Clumb,  in 
Milwaukee,  and  others  who  know  how  these 
can  build  up  into  great  cooperative  news- 
paper pages,  at  no  cost  to  the  theatre. 
Erv  lines  up  eight  sponsors  to  swing  a color 
cooperative  full  page  ad.  The  24-sheet 
and  other  posters  give  you  the  title  In 
great  big  letters  and  some  pictorial  art 
to  put  over  the  dancing  theme,  which  you 
can  use  as  cut-outs  for  lobby  and  marquee. 

• 

THE  PRISONER — Columbia  Pictures.  Alec 
Guinness,  great  British  actor,  in  perhaps  the 
most  provocative  drama  of  our  times,  with 
Jack  Hawkins,  giving  two  fine  perform- 
ances. "Any  confession  I may  have  made  In 
prison  will  be  a lie — the  result  of  human 
weakness!"  Which  one  was  the  prisoner? 
The  accused,  or  the  accuser?  The  hunter, 
or  the  hunted?  No  posters  larger  than  the 
one-sheet,  since  this  is  aimed  at  little  art 
theatres,  who  have  their  own  advertising 
standards.  But  it  will  satisfy  your  discern- 
ing patrons  who  are  seeking  something  new 
and  different  from  the  usual  film  fare. 
Newspaper  ad  mats  are  good — and  strong 
— In  usable  sizes,  and  the  composite  mat 
supplies  five  ad  mats  and  slugs,  and  two 
publicity  mats,  for  a majority  of  situations, 
all  for  35c  at  National  Screen.  Four  kinds 
of  still  sets  are  available,  and  that's  un- 
usual. Art  theatres  sell  their  attractions 
with  liberal  use  of  stills. 


YOU'LL  GET 
THE  FINEST 
TRAILERS 
...IN  THE 
SHORTEST 
TIME,  FROM 


SPECIAL 

TRAILERS 


37  years  of  Know- 
How  means  Better 
Trailers...  Faster! 


FILMACK 


CHICAGO 
1327  S.  WABASH 


\ NEW  YORK 
\ 341  W.  44th  St. 


. . . Timely  news  supplementing  the 
special  monthly  department  covering 
all  phases  of  refreshment  service. 


Five  New  Distributors 
For  Sweden  Freezer 

Five  new  distributors  have  been  added 
to  the  list  of  firms  handling-  the  line  of  soft- 
serve  ice  cream  and  milk  shake  making 
equipment  of  the  Sweden  Freezer  Manufac- 
turing Company,  Seattle,  Wash.,  according 
to  an  announcement  by  Harvey  F.  Swen- 
son, president.  The  firms  appointed  are  the 
Cyril  D.  Schultz  Company,  Erie,  Pa. ; 
Devereaux  Refrigeration  Company,  Ken- 
sington, Md. ; Virginia  Fixtures  Company, 
Norfolk,  Va. ; Central  Refrigeration  Service, 
Huntington,  West  Va. ; and  A.  G.  Gosselin 
Company,  Manchester,  N.  H. 

• 

New  Drink  Cup  for  Theatres 

A new  type  of  drink  cup  especially  con- 
structed for  the  theatre  trade  with  a design 
stressing  the  “entertainment  value  of  movies 
for  the  whole  family"  has  been  added  to  its 
line  by  the  Maryland  Cup  Company,  Balti- 
more. Trade-named  the  “Cinema  Cup,”  it 
is  being  offered  exclusively  to  theatre  con- 
cession operations  and  thus  will  serve  ideally 
for  inventory  control,  it  is  pointed  out.  The 
cup  is  available  in  a complete  range  of  sizes, 
including  7-,  9-,  10-,  14-,  or  16-ounce. 

• 


CONGRATULATING  A WINNER 


Mrs.  Rosella  Newman,  supervisor  in  Evansville,  Ind., 
for  the  Confection  Cabinet  Corporation,  supplier 
of  refreshment  services  to  theatres,  is  congratulated 
by  Lester  Grand,  executive  of  the  firm  on  a recent 
tour  of  theatres,  upon  being  one  of  the  first  winners 
of  Motion  Picture  Herald’s  Special  Merit  Awards 
for  refreshment  merchandising.  Mrs.  Newman, 
formerly  snack  bar  manager  of  Loew's  Victory  and 
Majestic  theatres  in  Evansville,  was  recently  pro- 
moted to  the  rank  of  supervisor. 


MANAGERS’  ROUND  TABLE  SECTION,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


47 


CLASSIFIED  ADVERTISING 


Fifteen  cents  per  word,  money-order  or  check  with  copy.  Count  initials,  box  number  and  address.  Minimum  insertion  $ 1 .50.  Four 
insertions  tor  the  price  of  three.  Contract  rates  on  application.  No  border  or  cuts.  Forms  close  Mondays  at  5 P.M.  Publisher 
reserves  the  right  to  reject  any  copy.  Film  and  trailer  advertising  not  accepted.  Classified  advertising  not  subject  to  agency 
commission.  Address  copy  and  checks:  MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  Classified  Dept.,  Rockefeller  Center,  New  York  (20) 


POSITIONS  WANTED 


MANAGER— CAPABLE,  EXPEiaENCEJ>,  FAM- 
ily  man,  age  38.  Now  assistant  general  manager  small 
circuit.  Consider  anywhere.  Pleasant  working  condi- 
tions. Prefer  South.  BOX  2892,  MOTION  PICTURE 
HERALD. 


THEATRES 


NO  TELEVISION,  TOWN  10,000  PEOPLE.  MOD- 
em.  CinemaScope,  building,  equipment,  netting  $22,000. 
Will  pay  out  four  years.  $50,000  down.  Brochure. 
P.  McADAM,  Livingston,  Mont. 


FOR  SALE:  NICE  CLEAN  400-SEAT  THEATRE. 
Good  opportunity  and  priced  right.  Write  CREST 
THEATRE,  Wellington,  Kans. 


FOR  SALE:  MODERN  400-SEAT  THEATRE. 

Built  new  from  the  ground  up.  Opened  in  1947. 
Simplex  E-7  projectors  and  4 star  sound.  Peerless 
Magnarc  lamps.  Wide  screen,  CinemaScope,  Manley 
Popcorn  machine.  Three  changes  per  week,  priced 
low  for  quick  sale.  Have  other  interests.  $35,000  takes 
all.  N.  C.  WETTSTEIN,  Coleman  Theatre,  Coleman, 
Wis. 


NEW  EQUIPMENT 


BARGAINS  GALORE  — HOLMES  PARTS  1 CON- 
denser  lenses,  95c;  constant  speed  motors  $12.50; 
shutter  shafts  $1.25;  sound  optical  lenses  $9.95;  inter- 
mittent $24.50;  Star-Sprocket  assembly  $10;  EE-14070 
Vertical  Drive  Shaft  w/5  gears,  bearings  $9.75; 
lOOOW  T-20C-13  Mogul  prefocus  Lamps  $25  dozen 
($3.95  each).  S.  O.  S.  ONEMA  SUPPLY  CORP., 
602  W.  52rid  St.,  New  York  19. 


BEST  CINEMASCOPE  BUY!  CINEMATIC  IV 
adjustable  anamorphics  $375  pr.  Metallic  seamless 
screens  75c  sq.  ft.  Buy  on  time.  S.O.S.  CINEMA 
SUPPLY  CORP..  602  W.  52nd  St.,  New  York  19. 

PREPARE  FOR  “KISMET.”  LOWEST  PRICES, 
prompt  deliveries  on  Foxhole  Sprockets  for  Standard 
& Super  Simplex,  E-7,  X-L,  Century  Projectors;  also 
most  soundheads  including  RCA  PS24,  MI  1040,  1050, 
1060,  9030,  9050;  W.E.  206,  208,  TA  7400;  Simplex  4 
Star  and  Ballantyne.  S.  O.  S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY 
CORPORATION,  602  W.  52nd  Street,  New  York  19. 


STUDIO  EQUIPMENT 


MITCHELL  16  CAMERA,  3 BALTAR  LENSES, 
2 magazines,  complete  $2995;  10'  Title  Animation 

Stand,  motorized  zoom,  stopmotion,  $2500  value, 
$975.00  Bardwell  McAlister  studio  floodlites,  3 heads 
on  rolling  stand  hold  12  bulbs,  $180  value,  $29.50; 
Quadlite  Heads  only,  $4.95;  Stands  only  $19.95; 
Neumade  editing  tables  with  worklight,  $58.00  value, 
$33.95;  Moviola  35mm  composite  sound/picture,  $495.00; 
Microrecord  16/35mm  Automatic  Processing  Outfits, 
demonstrators,  $136.95.  S.  O.  S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY 
CORPORATION,  602  W.  52nd  Street,  New  York  19. 


USED  EQUIPMENT 


EXCELLENT  COATED  PROJECTION  LENSES— 
many  brand  new!  Wollensak  “Sunray”  Series  I:  2”, 
3",  3K",  3)4”,  5”,  Sli",  5)4'',  6”,  7)4"  $35.00  pair. 
Super  Snaplite  fl.  9— 2''-254”  $170.00  pr. ; Superlite 
2)4''-3''-3)4"  $150.00  pr.;  Superlite  3)4''  $90.00  pr. 
Trades  Taken.  Wire  or  telephone  order  today.  S.  O.  S. 
aNEMA  SUPPLY  CORPORATION,  602  W.  52nd 
Street,  New  York  19. 


PAIR  DEVRY  12,000  PROJECTORS,  70  AMPEEE 
lamphouses,  rectifiers,  etc.,  excellent,  $1,495;  E7 
mechanisms,  excellent,  $475  pair;  Magnarc  lamphouses, 
late  type  $475  pair;  Strong  Ikw  lamphouses  and  recti- 
fiers $475  complete;  bargains  on  new  and  used  lenses. 
What  do  you  need?  STAR  QNEMA  SUPPLY,  621 
W.  55th  St.,  New  York  19. 


WANTED  TO  BUY 


WANTED  — ILLUSTRATED  SONG  SLIDES. 
Collector  wants  early  pop.,  comic,  sentimental  titles. 
Will  buy  small  or  large  lots.  JOHN  RIPLEY,  2400 
Crestview,  Topeka,  Kans. 


SERVICES 


THEATRE  BLOWUPS  BEST  OUALITY  SERV- 
ice,  STITES  PORTRAIT  COMPANY,  ShelbyvUle, 
Ind. 


HELP  WANTED 


SALESMEN— AGENTS  MAKE  EXTRA  MONEY— 
sell  nationally  advertised  automatic  Sno-Ball  Sno-Cone 
machines  on  easy  terms.  SNO-MASTER  MFG.  CO., 
124  Hopkins  Pi.,  Baltimore  1,  Md. 


MANAGER  — SHOWMAN  EXPERIENCED  IN 
medium-sized  town  operation.  $5200  minimum.  Family 
group  and  hospital  insurance.  North  Central  location. 
Give  full  information  first  letter.  References  not  used 
unless  deal.  BOX  2893,  MOTION  PICTURE. 
HERALD. 


WANTED,  TWO  (2)  MANAGERS  FOR  FIRST- 
run  theatres  in  cities  of  medium  size  situated  in 
eastern  part  of  the  states.  Must  be  thoroughly  ex- 
perienced and  definitely  interested  in  exploitation. 
Reply,  giving  full  resume  of  employment,  salary  re- 
quirements, references,  and  availability  for  interview, 
BOX  2894,  MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD. 


BOOKS 


RICHARDSON’S  BLUEBOOK  OF  PROJECTION. 
New  8th  Edition.  Revised  to  deal  with  the  latest  tech- 
nical developments  in  motion  picture  projection  and 
sound,  and  reorganized  to  facilitate  study  and  refer- 
ence. Includes  a practical  discussion  of  Television 
especially  prepared  for  the  instruction  of  theatre  pro- 
jectionists, and  of  new  techniques  for  advancement  of 
the  art  of  the  motion  picture.  The  standard  textbook 
on  motion  picture  projection  and  sound  reproduction. 
Invaluable  to  beginner  and  expert.  Best  seller  since 
1911.  662  pages,  cloth  Ixjund,  $7.25  postpaid.  QUIGLEY 
BOOKSH(>P,  1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New  York  29,  N.  Y. 


NEW  — FOR  THEATRE  MANAGERS  — “THE 
Master  Guide  to  'Theatre  Maintenance.”  compiled  from 
authorities,  handy  for  reference  with  hard  covers  ana 
index.  Chapters  on  maintenance  of  building  and 
furnishings,  on  air  conditioning,  projection,  sound,  ex- 
ploitation devices,  all  written  in  non-technical  language 
especially  for  theatre  owners,  managers  and  staffs. 
Indexed  for  ready  reference.  Send  $5.00  today  to 
QUIGLEY  BOOKSHOP,  1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New 
York  20,  N.  Y. 


MOTION  PICTURE  ALMANAC  — the  big  book 
about  your  business — 1956  edition.  Contains  over  12,000 
biographies  of  important  motion  picture  personalities. 
Also  all  industry  statistics.  Complete  listings  of  feature 
pictures  1944  to  date.  Order  your  copy  today.  $5.00, 
postage  included.  Send  remittance  to  QUIGLEY 
BOOKSHOP,  1270  Si-xth  Avenue,  New  York  20,  N.  Y. 


Legion  Approves  Five  of 
Nine  New  Productions 

The  National  Legion  of  Decency  this 
week  reviewed  ten  pictures,  putting  two  in 
Class  A,  Section  I,  morally  unobjectionable 
for  general  patronage ; three  in  Class  A, 
Section  II,  morally  unobjectionable  for 
adults;  three  in  Class  B,  morally  objection- 
able in  part  for  all,  and  two  in  Class  C, 
condemned.  In  Section  I are  “Fury  at  Gun- 
sight  Pass”  and  “Never  Say  Goodbye.”  In 
Section  II  are  “Alone  on  the  Streets,”  “Hell 
on  Frisco  Bay”  and  “Ransom.”  In  Class 
B are  “The  Conqueror”  because  of  “exces- 
sive brutality;  suggestive  costuming,  danc- 
ing and  situations;”  “The  Lieutenant  Wore 
Skirts”  because  of  “suggestive  costuming, 
dialogue  and  sequences,”  and  “Shack  Out  on 
101”  because  of  “suggestive  dialogue  and 
situations.”  In  Class  C is  “A  Husband  for 
Anna”  because  “this  picture,  in  the  story  it 
tells,  condones  immoral  actions  and  in  treat- 
ment seriously  offends  Christian  and  tradi- 


tional standards  of  morality  and  decency  by 
reason  of  suggestive  costuming  and  situa- 
tions,” and  “Letters  From  My  Windmill” 
because  it  is  “seriously  objectionable  and 
conducive  to  a misunderstanding  of  religion 
and  religious  practices.” 


Universal  Votes  Dividend 

The  board  of  directors  of  Universal  Pic- 
tures Company,  Inc.,  has  declared  a quar- 
terly dividend  of  $1.0625  per  share  on  the 
4%  per  cent  cumulative  preferred  stock  of 
the  company.  The  dividend  is  payable 
March  1,  1956  to  stockholders  of  record 
February  15. 


Henry  Weiner 

HAVANA:  Henry  Weiner,  79,  former 
United  Artists  manager  in  Cuba,  died  at  his 
home  here  January  9.  Mr.  Weiner  joined 
U.A.  in  1921  as  head  of  the  company’s  newly 
opened  office  in  Havana.  He  held  the  post 
31  years. 


Norman  5.  Gaskill,  Jr, 

PHILADELPHIA:  Norman  S.  Gaskill,  Jr., 
39,  office  manager  for  Columbia  Pictures 
here  for  the  past  two  years,  died  January  6 
at  his  desk  at  the  exchange  office.  He  is 
survived  by  his  wife,  Evelyn,  and  a >on. 


Shurlock's  Mother  Dies 

HOLLYWOOD:  Mrs.  Frances  H.  Shur- 
lock,  99,  mother  of  Geoffrey  Shuiiock,  Pro- 
duction Code  Administrator,  died  here  Janu- 
ary 7,  eight  days  short  of  her  hundreth 
birthday.  A daughter,  Mrs.  Olive  Sjorlan- 
der,  had  arrived  from  Sweden  to  attend  the 
birthday  ceremonies. 


Lease  Long  Island  Unit 

The  900-seat  Howard  theatre  at  Howard 
Beach,  Long  Island,  N.  Y.,  has  been  leased 
by  Michael  Fishman,  L.  I.  theatre  operator. 


48 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14.  1956 


Glory 

RKO-Butler — A Horse  and  a Girl 
(Print  by  Technicolor) 

Stories  about  horses  and  horse  racing  are 
nothing  unusual  for  film  audiences.  But  there  is 
never  a plethora  of  them  to  make  audiences  feel 
sated.  “Glory”  comes  along  at  a time  when 
there  are  very  few  tales  of  the  turf  about  and 
should  therefore  gain  a goodly  audience.  It  has 
all  the  necessary  ingredients  including  color, 
Superscope,  a good  cast  and  even  music  but  its 
tired  story  and  excessive  running  time  prevent 
it  from  being  a better  picture  than  it  is. 

Margaret  O’Brien  returns  to  the  screen  an 
attractive  young  lady  and  she  and  Charlotte 
Greenwood  as  her  grandmother  carry  the  bur- 
den of  the  plot.  They  comprise  an  impoverished 
family  who  own  a small  stable  of  horses.  When 
a filly  is  born.  Miss  O’Brien  falls  in  love  with 
her,  names  her  “Glory”  and  sees  a great  future 
for  her.  Miss  Greenwood  holds  no  such  enthu- 
siasm for  the  female  of  the  species  and  tries  to 
get  rid  of  her  as  a yearling.  But  through  the 
intervention  of  a rich  sportsman  (the  love  in 
the  young  lady’s  life)  they  get  her  back. 

Glory  loses  races  constantly  until  Walter 
Brennan,  a trainer,  discovers  she  needs  goggles 
to  race  successfully.  Her  young  owner  enters 
her  in  the  Kentucky  Derby  but  the  lack  of 
money  still  plagues  her  and  her  grandmother. 
Once  again  the  horse  is  sold  and  brought  back 
and  this  time  all  their  friends  pool  their  money 
for  the  necessary  funds.  Needless  to  say.  Glory 
wins  the  Derby  and  Miss  O’Brien  wins  her  man 
(despite  the  presence  of  a spoiled  society  lass). 

Tbe  picture  is  saddled  with  some  subplots  in- 
cluding a romance  between  Miss  O’Brien  and 
an  orchestra  leader  whom  she  works  for.  In 
addition,  Brennan  and  Miss  Greenwood  carry 
on  a screaming  feud  throughout  the  picture 
about  some  trifle  that  wears  rather  thin  after 
the  first  four  or  five  outbursts. 

Although  ‘‘Glory”  deals  primarily  with 
horses  and  its  dialogue  rarely  leaves  the  subject 
(even  in  its  songs),  the  races  seen  are  few  and 
far  between.  David  Butler,  who  produced  and 
directed,  would  have  been  wiser  to  include  more. 

The  acting  is  better  than  the  material  with 
Miss  Greenwood  giving  her  usual  adept  per- 
formance. The  supporting  cast  includes  John 
Lupton  and  Byron  Palmer  as  Miss  O’Brien’s 
wanted  and  unwanted  loves  and  Lisa  Davis  as 
the  other  woman.  Pete  Milne  wrote  the  screen- 
play which  was  based  on  a story  by  Gene 
Markey.  “Glory”  trots  more  often  than  it  runs. 

Seen  at  the  RKO  screening  room  in  Nezu 
York.  Reviewer’s  Rating:  Good. — Jay  Remer. 

Release  date,  January  11,  1956.  Running  time,  100 
minutes.  PCA  No.  17647.  General  audience  classifica- 
tion. 

Clarabel  Tilhee Margaret  O’Brien 

Ned  Otis Walter  Brennan 

Miz  Tilbee Charlotte  Greenwood 

John  Lupton,  Byron  Palmer,  Lisa  Davis.  Gus  Schilling, 
Theron  Jackson,  Hugh  Sanders,  Walter  Baldwin,  Harry 
Tyler,  Leonid  Kinskey,  Paul  E.  Burns,  Madge  Blake 

The  Night  My  Number 
Came  Up 

J.  Arthur  Rank — Superstition 

“The  Night  My  Number  Came  Up,”  a new 
British  experiment  in  the  realm  of  the  psychic, 
although  told  at  somewhat  too  leisurely  a pace 
perhaps  to  satisfy  action-conditioned  American 
audiences,  does  succeed  in  maintaining  a goodly 
degree  of  suspense. 


Acting  performances  are  first  rate,  especially 
those  of  Alichael  Redgrave  and  Canadian-born 
Alexander  Knox,  successful  now  in  England, 
who  carries  off  first  honors  here  because  he 
makes  himself  consistently  understood  amid  the 
welter  of  British  accent.  The  story  is  reported 
to  be  based  on  a 1951  Saturday  Evening  Post 
article  of  the  same  title  as  the  picture,  recount- 
ing the  real-life  experience  of  one  Air  Marshal 
Sir  Victor  Goddard. 

At  a dinner  party  in  the  home  of  Knox,  a 
British  official  in  Asia,  Michael  Hordern,  a 
British  naval  officer,  describes  to  an  air  com- 
mander, Michael  Redgrave,  and  other  guests  a 
dream  he  had  had  the  night  before.  In  the 
dream,  Redgrave  is  one  of  13  people  aboard  a 
DC3.  Along  with  the  five-man  crew,  the  plane 
also  carries  an  attractive  girl,  a “very  important 
personage,”  and  five  other  civilians.  The  air- 
craft is  lost  over  the  sea,  its  radio  has  failed  and 
fuel  is  running  low  when,  through  a break  in 
the  snow  clouds,  a rock-strewn  beach  is  sighted. 
The  pilot  attempts  an  emergency  landing,  fails 
to  avoid  the  cliff,  and  the  plane  crashes. 

Redgrave  and  another  officer,  Denholm  Elli- 
ott, who  is  also  among  the  guests  hearing  the 
strange  dream,  are  due  to  fly  to  Japan  the  next 
day.  Gradually  all  the  details  of  the  dream  be- 
gin to  materialize  in  actuality.  Knox,  who  finds 
himself  among  the  passengers  in  the  plane 
doomed  in  the  dream,  and  whose  many  years  in 
the  Orient  have  rendered  him  susceptible  to 
fatalism  and  superstition,  is  gradually  joined  by 
the  others  in  a realization  of  their  fate.  The 
conclusion  will  satisfy  some  audiences,  frustrate 
others  who  require  pat  resolutions.  The  sus- 
pense is  well  enough  handled,  but  the  heavy 
British  accents,  the  drawn-out  pace  and  unsatis- 
factory (to  some)  conclusion  would  seem  to 
limit  this  film  to  specialized  audiences  who  lean 
toward  intellectual  exercises  as  against  action 
emphasis. 

A J.  Arthur  Rank  Organisation  presentation, 
the  film  has  a screenplay  by  R.  C.  Sherriff,  pro- 
duction supervision  by  Hal  Mason,  direction  by 
Leslie  Norman  and  is  an  Ealing  Studios- 
Michael  Balcon  production. 

Seen  at  the  Sutton  theatre,  Nezv  York.  Re- 
viezver’s  Rating:  Very  Good.  — Lawrence 

J.  Quirk. 

Release  date,  February  21,  1956.  Running-  time,  94 
minutes.  General  audience  classificHtion. 

.-\ir  Marshal  Hardie Michael  Redgrave 

Mary  Campbell Sheila  Sim 

Owen  Robertson Alexander  Knox 

Flight  Lt.  McKenzie Denholm  Elliott 

IJrsula  Jeans,  Ralph  Truman,  Michael  Hordern,  Nigel 
.Stock,  Bill  Kerr,  Alfie  Bass,  George  Rose,  Victor  Mad- 
dern,  David  Orr.  David  Yates,  Doreen  Aris,  Charles 
Perry,  Geoffrey  Tyrrell.  Hugh  Moxey,  Richard  Davies 

Fury  at  Gunsight  Pass 

Columbia — Western  Bank  Robbers 

This  Columbia  Western  follows  a familiar 
pattern  but  holds  the  interest  nicely  with  fast- 
paced  direction,  earnest  acting  and  dialogue  that 
sticks  to  the  point  and  wastes  nary  a word. 


SHOWMEN’S  REVIEWS 
SHORT  SUBJECTS 
WHAT  THE  PICTURE  DID 
THE  RELEASE  CHART 
THE  COMPANY  CHART 


David  Brian  and  Neville  Brand  provide  the  only 
name  values,  but  young  Richard  Long  in  the 
third  starring  spot  demonstrates  promising  de- 
velopment as  an  actor.  A windstorm  running 
throughout  the  picture’s  last  quarter  offers  in- 
teresting counterpoint  to  the  action — and  there’s 
plenty  of  that.  The  kids  in  the  front  rows  will 
love  it,  and  adults  won’t  be  bored. 

Brian  and  Brand,  leaders  of  a gang  of  west- 
ern toughs,  have  the  usual  designs  on  a small 
town  bank,  but  their  carefully  laid  plans  go 
awry.  They  plan  to  close  in  in  separate  groups 
during  the  wedding  of  the  banker’s  son.  Long, 
when  it  is  expected  the  locale  will  be  clear. 
Percy  Helton,  the  local  undertaker,  is  an  ac- 
complice. The  wedding  ceremony  runs  on  too 
long  and  Brian  and  his  henchmen,  who  accord- 
ing to  previous  arrangement  were  to  come  in 
first  and  mingle  with  the  wedding  guests  while 
Brian’s  partner.  Brand  and  his  men  were  sched- 
uled to  arrive  an  hour  later  for  the  take  ($35,- 
000),  find  themselves  shooting  it  out  with  the 
alerted  townspeople  through  a miscalculation, 
Brian,  it  also  appears,  had  planned  to  double 
cross  his  partner  and  make  off  with  the  money 
in  advance. 

In  the  ensuing  confusion,  Helton  secretes  the 
satchel  of  money  which  the  bandits  had  mur- 
dered the  banker  to  obtain,  the  banker’s  partner 
accuses  the  dead  man  of  being  the  bandits’  ac- 
complice, the  banker’s  son  vows  to  clear  his 
father’s  name,  the  second  bandit  group  led  by 
Brand  arrive,  take  alarm,  and  escape,  and  the 
usual  lynching  threats  are  made  on  Brian’s  cap- 
tured half  of  the  gang. 

The  complicated  plot  threads  are  finally 
straightened  out  after  much  shooting  and  scur- 
rying about,  during  which  the  posse  of  towns- 
people sent  out  to  capture  Brand  and  his  men 
is  itself  captured,  and  an  infuriated  Brand  re- 
turns with  his  men  to  locate  the  satchel.  Long 
and  his  friends  finally  succeed,  after  further  plot 
action  in  the  windstorm,  in  setting  all  things 
to  right  in  neat  style,  and  the  young  man  and 
his  bride,  Lisa  Davis,  resume  their  interrupted 
honeymoon. 

David  Lang  wrote  the  story  and  screenplay, 
Wallace  MacDonald  produced  and  Fred  F. 
Sears  directed  this  little  action  piece,  which  may 
not  leave  audiences  cheering  but  should  enter- 
tain them  solidly  enough. 

Seen  ot  the  Columbia  screening  room  in  Nezv 
York.  Reviezver’s  Rating:  Good. — L.J.Q. 

Rele-Jse  date.  February.  19.56.  Running  time.  6S  iriin- 
utes.  Pr.-\  No  17716.  General  audience  classification. 

Whitey  Turner David  Brian 

Dirk  Hogan Neville  Brand 

Roy  Hanford Richard  Long 

Kathy  Phillips Lisa  Davis 

Katharine  Warren,  Percy  He'ton.  Morris  Ankrum. 
.Addison  Richards,  Joe  Forte,  Wally  Vernon.  Paul  E. 
Burns.  Frank  Fenton,  James  Anderson.  George  Key- 
mas,  Robert  Anderson.  Fred  Goby,  John  I.ehmann, 
Guy  Teague 

Wiretapper 

Continental  Pictures — Crime  Doesn't  Fit 

This  is  what  is  known  as  an  exploitation 
picture.  Lacking  names,  it  has  other  sales  ap- 
peal. There  is  the  central  one,  wiretapping, 
which  for  several  years  has  furnished  excite- 
ment for  the  tabloids. 

There  is  what  is  known  as  ‘‘The  Jim  Vans 
Story.”  This  refers  to  a book  Vaus  wrote 
in  the  brightness  of  inspiration.  Vaus  tapped 
wires  for  the  Mickey  Cohen  mob  until 
Billy  Graham  pummeled  him  with  Scripture 
(Continued  on  foUou'ing  page) 


PRODUCT  DIGEST  SECTION,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


737 


(C(»ili)ntcd  from  preceding  page) 

made  popular.  He  dashed  off  the  lxx)k.  took  to 
the  road,  and  now  himself  has  a considerable 
pulpit  reputation.  He  is  reported  along  with 
Mr.  Graham  to  be  associated  in  the  production 
company.  Mission  Communications  Services. 

Finally,  there  is  ^fr.  Graham.  He  arrives 
toward  the  end,  as  his  Gospel  reading,  aggres- 
sive and  sincere,  makes  \’aus  rue  the  life 
wasted  and  yearn  for  the  cleanliness  of  a purged 
conscience — and  therefore  risk  his  skin  by  quit- 
ting tl:e  gang.  Mr.  Graham’s  reading  is  the- 
atrically effective  and  is  worth  possible  sensa- 
tionalism in  exploiting  the  picture  where  the 
Graham  name  registers. 

There  is  one  more  asset,  the  acting  by  Bill 
Williams.  He  brings  to  the  Vans  role  a somber 
and  therefore  efficient  portrayal.  He  is  the  mas- 
ter in  electronics  and  the  weakling  in  character, 
sliding  from  one  job  for  the  mobsters  into 
others,  and  although  it  is  a sort  of  gestatory 
development  as  he  becomes  increasingly  uneasy 
and  ripe  for  the  conversion,  he  finds  achieve- 
ment and  relish  in  inventing  a machine  which 
will  delay  race  results  and  enable  him  and  his 
associates  to  cheat  the  "bookies”.  The  session 
with  Graham  ends  all  this  and  although  he  ex- 
pects a bullet  in  the  back  after  defying  the 
gangsters,  they  strangely  forbear,  and  the  story 
ends. 

The  welding  of  religious  with  typical  crime 
drama  is  moderately  successful.  Oddly,  the  pur- 
poseful producers  are  most  convincing  with  the 
situations  and  dialogue  pertaining  to  hoodlum- 
ism  and  organized  crime.  The  sweetness  and 
light  assigned  to  Miss  Lee  as  the  wife  forever 
innocent  and  trusting,  is  sticky  and  incredible. 

John  O’Dea  adapted  his  screenplay  from  the 
Vans  book,  Dick  Ross  directed,  and  Rodney 
Nelson  was  production  e.xecutive.  Continental 
Pictures  is  the  corporate  production  name,  and 
Embassy  Pictures  of  Boston  has  world  wide 
distribution  rights.  States-right  exchanges  have 
been  given  franchises.  The  picture  is  in  1 :85  to 
1 ratio. 

Seen  at  a Neiv  York  production  room.  Ke- 
riczt'cr’s  Rating:  Good. — Floyd  Elbert  Stone. 

Release  date,  February,  1956.  Running  time,  80 
minutes.  PCA  No.  17618.  General  audience  classi- 
fication. 

Jim  Vans Rill  Williams 

Mrs.  \’aus Georgia  Lee 

Douglas  Kennedy.  Phil  Tead,  Stanley  Clements,  Ric 
Roman,  Richard  Benedict,  Paul  Piciini,  Steve  Conte, 
Melinda  Plowman,  Art  Gilmore,  Howard  WendelL 
Dorothy  Kennedy,  Barbara  Hudson,  Evangeline  Car- 
michael 

Three  Bad  Sisters 

UA — Sex  and  Sadism 

Younger  audiences,  and  the  critically  un- 
discerning, should  find  this  potpourri  of  stand- 
ard melodramatics  and  assorted  villlainies  fairly 
diverting  fare,  liberally  sprinkled  with  sex, 
although  contrived  situations,  a laborious  pace 
and  pedestrian  acting  will  limit  its  appeal  to 
action  and  neighborhood  houses. 

John  Bromfield  has  more  lives  than  a cat  in 
this  one.  He  saunters  awav  from  plane  crashes 
and  auto  accidents  that  kill  fellow  passengers, 
and  neatly  sidesteps  various  schemes  for  his  un- 
doing concocted  by  the  sisters,  only  two  of 
whom  are  ‘‘bad,’’  incidentally.  These  unpleasant 
young  women  are  played  by  Marla  English, 
a malicious,  amoral  flirt;  Kathleen  Hughes,  a 
scheming,  sadistic  wench,  and  Sara  Shane,  who 
while  technically  “good”  seems  intrinsically 
more  evil  than  the  others  in  her  passive  ac- 
ceptance of  the  goings-on  about  her. 

Bromfield,  a pilot,  gets  involved  with  the 
sisters  when  their  father,  a multi-millionaire, 
goes  berserk  and  grabs  the  controls  of  the  char- 
tered plane,  killing  himself  but  not  the  star. 
Miss  Hughes,  the  millionaire’s  daughter,  wants 
to  get  rid  of  her  sisters  so  she  can  inherit  the 
fortune.  She  talks  Bromfield  into  a deal  to 
alienate  .sister  Sara  Shane  fthe  executrix)  from 
her  lawyer  fiancee,  Jess  Barker  and  hence  aid 
her  in  controlling  the  estate. 

spurious  contract  between  Bromfield  and 
the  deceased  is  introduced  by  Miss  Hughes  in 
order  to  insinuate  Bromfield  into  the  household. 
The  remainder  of  the  film  is  taken  up  with  the 
star  fending  off  the  onslaughts,  romantic  and 


murderous,  of  the  sisters,  coping  with  a sus- 
picious family  aunt,  who  thinks  he  murdered 
the  millionaire  in  the  plane  crash,  and  falling  in 
love  with,  and  marrying  the  “good”  sister. 

Things  get  highly  overwrought,  with  the  in- 
defatigable Miss  Hughes  disfiguring  her  sister 
in  a quarrel  ov'er  Bromfield,  and  driving  her  to 
suicide;  Miss  Shane  attempting  suicide  and  get- 
ting saved  by  her  husband,  a busy  fellow  ; and 
Miss  Hughes  getting  her  final  comeuppance  in 
an  auto  crash  at  the  finish,  thus  satisfying  the 
rulings  regarding  villainesses  coming  to  no 
good  end.  It  should  be  noted,  however,  that 
the  highly  colored  amorality  and  greed  the  lit- 
tle lady  demonstrates  for  70-odd  minutes  prior 
to  this  deserved  ending  is  likely  to  linger 
longer  in  impressionable  young  minds  and  this 
should  debar  the  film  from  general  audience 
classification, 

The  screenplay  by  Gerald  Drayson  Adams. 
A Bel-Air  Production  released  through  United 
■A.rtists,  it  lists  Aubrey  Schenck  as  executive 
producer ; Howard  Koch  as  producer  and  Gil- 
bert L.  Kay  as  director. 

Seen  at  a New  York  projection  room.  Re- 
viezoer’s  Rating:  Fair. — L.  J.  Q. 

Release  date.  January,  1956.  Running  time,  73 
minutes  PCA  No.  17670.  .Adult  audience  classification. 


Vicki Marla  Knglish 

Valerie Kathleen  Hughes 

Lorna  Sara  Shane 

Jim  Norton John  Bromfield 


Jess  Barker,  Madge  Kennedy.  Tony  George,  Eric 
Wilton,  Brett  Halsey,  Marlene  Felton 

Appointment  in  London 

Associated  Artists — World  War  II  Drama 

“Appointment  in  London,”  which  co-stars 
Dirk  Bogarde  and  Dinah  Sheridan  manages  to 
be  nostalgic  about  a long-gone  war  era  without 
resorting  too  heavily  to  heart  tugs.  Bogarde 
was  the  winner  of  the  1955  Motion  Picture 
Herald — Fame  poll  of  British  e.xhibitors. 

The  time  is  1943,  the  setting  a bomber  com- 
mand base  somewhere  in  England.  Principals 
arc  wing  commander  Bogarde,  an  American 
(William  Sylvester),  an  .Australian  (Bill 
Kerr),  and  Bryan  Forbes.  Returning  from  a 
strategic  mission  over  the  Continent,  the  men 
are  informed  by  group  captain  Ian  Hunter  that 
an  important  London  appointment  is  slated  for 
a month  away.  Later,  celebrating  in  a village 
pub,  Bogarde  and  Sylvester  meet  and  are  sub- 
sequently enchanted  by  WREN  officer  Sheri- 
dan. wiio,  it  develops,  has  eyes  onlv  for 
Bogarde. 

Hunter  decides  that  Bo.garde  has  had  enough 
combat,  and  grounds  him  indefinitely.  Kerr, 
however,  has  a pre-takeoff  accident,  and  Bo- 
garde disobeys  Hunter’s  orders  and  goes  on  the 
mission. 

Finally  Bogarde’s  ship  comes  into  sight  to 
Miss  Sheridan’s  deep  relief. 

Disregarding  the  inevitable  flurry  of  flag- 
waving  histrionics,  “.Appointment  in  London” 
impresses  as  well-made  melodrama. 

The  film  was  produced  by  Aubrey  Baring 
and  Maxwell  Setton,  with  competent  direction 
by  Philip  Leacock. 

Seen  at  Loezo’s  Poli  theatre,  Hartford.  Rc- 
ri'’n’cr'.i  Ratina:  Good. — Allen  M.  Widem. 

Release  date,  November,  1955.  Ruuuing  time,  96 
minutes.  General  audience  classification. 

Dirk  Bogarde,  Dinah  Sheridan,  Ian  Hunter.  William 
Sylvester,  Bill  Kerr,  Bryan  Forbes.  W'alter  Fitzgerald 

The  Day  the  World  Ended 

American  Releasing — Science  Fiction 

Richard  Denning,  Lori  Nelson  and  Adcle 
jergens  arc  the  principal  players  and  selling- 
names  in  this  science-fiction  film  produced  and 
directed  by  Roger  Gorman  for  executive  pro- 
ducer .Alex  Gordon.  The  script  is  by  Lon 
Rusoff,  as  is  that  of  “The  Phantom  from  10,000 
Leagues,”  another  American  Releasing  Cor- 
poration attraction  that  is  being  paired  with  this 
one  in  some  territories  to  make  up  an  all-sci- 
ence-fiction program. 

“The  Day  the  World  Ended.”  filmccl  in 
Suiicr.Scope,  ojicns  at  the  end  of  atomic  disas- 
ters which  have  depopulated  the  world  save  for 
seven  jicople  who  arrive  singly  at  a mountain 


sheltered  home  where  a scientist,  foreseeing  the 
depopulation,  has  prepared  reserve  supplies  to 
maintain  his  daughter  and  himself  until  life  may 
again  be  made  possible  elsewhere  in  the  world. 
The  seven  go  through  expectable  situations  and 
complications,  but  the  over-all  terror  is  an  ape- 
like mutant,  produced  by  atomic  radiation, 
which  stalks  the  forest  but  is  destroyed,  finally, 
by  a rainfall  in  which  it  cannot  survive. 

The  story  is  properly  implausible,  the  action 
is  overslowed,  as  if  for  the  juvenile  comprehen- 
sion on  which  the  film  may  depend  for  main 
revenue,  and  the  impact  is  less  than  the  essen- 
tial merit  of  the  basic  idea  would  suggest. 

Prcvteived  at  the  Hollywood  Hawaii  theatre. 
Reviezver’s  Rating : Fair. — William  R.  Weaver. 

Release  date,  January,  1956.  Running  time,  80  min- 
utes. PCA  No.  17722.  General  audience  classification. 


Rock  Richard  Denning 

Louise  Lori  Nelson 


Adele  Jergens,  Touch  Connors,  Paul  Birch,  Raymond 
Hattan,  Paul  Dubov,  Jonathan  Haze,  Paul  Blaisdell 

The  Phantom  from  10,000 
Leagues 

American  Releasing — Science  Fiction 

Kent  Taylor,  Cathy  Downs  and  Michael 
Whalen  are  the  principal  players  and  selling- 
names  in  this  science-fiction  film  produced  by 
Jack  and  Dan  Alilner  and  directed  by  the  latter. 
The  script  is  by  Lou  Rusoff,  as  is  that  of  “The 
Day  the  World  Ended,”  another  American  Re- 
leasing Corporation  attraction  that  is  being 
paired  with  this  one  in  some  territories  to  make 
up  an  all-science-fiction  program. 

“The  Phantom  from  10,000  Leagues”  con- 
cerns the  research  conducted  by  an  ocean- 
ographer off  the  coast  of  California  and  the  re- 
sultant monster  which  stands  g~uard,  at  sea  bot- 
tom, over  an  uranium  deposit  so  powerful  that 
it  sends  a shaft  of  light  up  through  the  water. 
The  monster  has  killed  a number  of  fishermen 
and  skin-divers  before  the  monster’s  creator, 
who  has  produced  him  by  a process  of  atomic 
mutation,  blows  it  to  bits.  LL  S.  and  other 
agents,  including  local  police,  have  had  a hand 
in  the  story  before  its  termination. 

The  pace  is  slow,  as  if  in  consideration  of 
the  probability  that  the  film’s  destiny  is  the 
science-fiction  fringe,  but  the  story  line  is  kept 
clear  and  there  is  proper  relationship  between 
cause  and  effect. 

Preziewed  at  the  Hazvaii  theatre.  Revieu'cr’s 
Rating:  Fair. — W.R.M’. 

Release  date,  January,  1956.  Runninj;  time,  W min- 
utes. PGA  No.  17791.  General  audience  classification. 


Ted  Kent  Taylor 

I.ois  Cathy  Downs 


Michael  Whalen,  Helene  Stanton,  Philip  Pine,  Rodney 
Bell,  Pierce  Lyden,  Vivi  Janis,  Michael  Garth 

SHORT  SUBJECTS 

BASKETBALL  HIGHLIGHTS 
(RKO) 

Sport  Special  (53,801) 

The  highlights  of  National  Invitational  Tour- 
nament of  basketball  at  Madison  Square  Garden 
and  the  N.C..A.A.  tournament  in  Kansas  City 
are  presented.  Among  the  games  show-n  are 
Duquesne  vs.  Louisville,  Cincinnati  vs.  Niagara, 
Dayton  vs.  St.  Louis,  St.  Francis  (Pa.)  vs. 
Holy  Cross,  San  Francisco  vs.  LaSalle,  St. 
Francis  (Pa.)  vs.  Cincinnati,  Dayton  vs.  Du- 
quesne, East  vs.  West  .All  Stars. 

Release  date:  .Ipril  15,  1955  15  minutes 

PAGEANTS  AND  PASTIMES 
(20+h-Fox) 

CinemaScopc  Special  in  Eastman  Color 
(7510-1) 

The  setting  of  this  short  filmed  by  British 
Movietonews  is  the  race  course  on  Ascot  Heath 
where  the  famous  summer  meeting  has  long 
been  the  highlight  of  the  English  racing  season. 
The  Queen  and  the  Duke  of  Edinburgh  are 
cheered  hy  the  crowd  as  they  arrive.  The  con- 
clusion shows  the  installation  of  Sir  Winston 
Churchill  in  to  the  ‘‘Most  Noble  Order  of  the 
Garter.” 

Release  date:  March,  1955  13  minutes 


738 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


^lAJkat  tLe 
f^icture  did  Pc 


99 


OP  me 


. . . the  original  exhibitors'  reports  department,  established  October  14,  1916.  In  it  theatremen 
serve  one  another  with  information  about  the  box  office  performance  of  product — providing  a 
service  of  the  exhibitor  for  the  exhibitor.  ADDRESS  REPORTS,  What  the  Picture  Did  for  Me, 
Motion  Picture  Herald,  Rockefeller  Center,  New  York  20. 


Allied  Artists 

LORD  OF  THE  JUNGLE:  Johnny  Sheffield, 

Wayne  Morris — A Tarzan  type  picture  that  the  kids 
seemed  to  like.  It’s  the  type  of  picture  TV  is  getting 
— Harland  Rankin,  Rankin  Enterprises,  Chatham,  Out., 
Canada. 


Buena  Vista 

LADY  AND  THE  TRAMP:  Disney  Cartoon  Fea- 
ture— Delightful  entertainment.  Of  course,  as  soon 
as  the  children  left,  we  were  all  through.  Played 
Sunday,  Monday,  December  4.  5. — Mrs.  Elaine  S. 
George.  Star  Theatre,  Heppner,  Ore. 

LADY  AND  THE  TRAMP:  Cartoon  Feature— Great 
picture  for  exploitation  which  will  do  business  for 
you. — Harland  Rankin,  Rankin  Enterprises,  Chatham, 
Ont.,  Canada. 


Columbia 

MAN  FROM  LA.RAMIE,  THE:  James  Stewart, 
Arthur  Kennedy — Our  people  agree  with  TOA  in  their 
opinion  of  James  Stewart.  Did  proudly  for  Decem- 
ber with  its  Christmas  shopping  and  frigid  tempera- 
ture Played  Sunday,  Monday,  December  11,  12. — 
Mrs.  Elaine  S.  George,  Star  Theatre,  Heppner,  Ore. 


Lippert 

LONESOME  TRAIL:  Wayne  Morris,  John  Agar— 
This  is  strictly  for  a double  bill,  a class  *‘B”  picture. 
Played  Thursday,  Friday,  Saturday,  December  22,  23. 
24, — Harland  Rankin,  Rankin  Enterprises,  Chatham. 
Ont.,  Canada. 


Metro-Gold  wyn-Mayer 

SCARLET  COAT:  Cornel  Wilde.  .-Viine  Francis — 
This  is  go<^,  but  like  all  historical  pictures,  must 
be  sold.  Will  die  an  awful  death  unless  you  appeal 
to  those  interested  in  our  history. — Hugh  G.  Martin, 
Valerie  Theatre,  Inverness,  Fla. 

TENDER  TRAP,  THE:  Frank  Sinatra,  Debbie 

Reynolds— This  is  one  of  the  finest  comedies  of  all 
time.  Will  rank  with  “It  Happened  One  Night” 
I Col.)  and  “The  Awful  Truth”  (Col.).  Did  better 
than  average  business  and  deserved  it. — Hugh  G. 
Martin,  Clay  Theatre,  Green  Cove  Springs,  IHa. 


Paramount 

GIRL  RUSH:  Rosalind  Russell,  Fernando  Lamas 
—We  haven’t  been  doing  much  on  musicals  recently, 
but  the  laughter  on  this  one  was  long  and  loud. 
Played  Thursday,  Friday,  Saturday,  December  8,  9, 
10. — Mrs.  Elaine  S.  George,  Star  'Theatre,  Heppner’ 
Ore. 

GIRL  RUSH,  THE:  Rosalind  Russell,  Fernando 
Lamas— The  trailer  looked  good,  but  the  picture  didn’t 
go  over.  Rosalind  Russell  isn’t  for  musical  come- 
dies. Played  Monday,  Tuesday,  Wednesday,  Decem- 
ber 19,  20,  21. — Harland  Rankin.  Rankin  Enterprises. 
Chatham,  Chit.,  Canada. 

LUCY  GALLANT:  Jane  Wyman.  Charlton  Heston 
—Did  average  business  the  week  l>efore  Christmas, 
which  is  a compliment  to  the  picture.— Hugh  G.  Mar- 
tin, Palace  ’Theatre,  Leesburg,  Fla. 


RKO  Radio 

HANSEL  & GRETEL:  Anna  Russell,  Jlildred  Dun- 
nock— If  you  have  not  played  this  one,  play  it  and 
give  your  children  patrons  a treat.  Be  sure  and  double 


CONSTANT  READER  GLAD 
THAT  RANKIN  IS  BACK 

James  A.  Duncan,  manager  of  the  23rd 
Street  Drive-In  theatre,  Chattanooga, 
Tenn.,  who  reads  "What  the  Picture  Did 
for  Me"  regularly,  writes  to  Harland  Rankin, 
at  Chatham,  Ontario,  with  this  cordial 
message: 

"It  was  indeed  a pleasure  to  see  your 
name  again  in  Motion  Picture  Herald.  I 
wondered  if  you  had  actually  been  absent 
from  exhibitor  ranks,  or  whether  I had  just 
missed  seeing  your  name,  I remember  that 
I used  to  watch  for  your  reports. 

"In  your  visits  around  the  country,  if  you 
are  ever  in  the  vicinity  of  Chattanooga, 
please  accept  this  as  your  invitation  to  visit 
with  me,  as  I would  be  most  happy  to  see 
you." 

Harland  has  been  traveling,  and  he  has 
threatened  to  get  out  of  film  business,  but 
he  will  always  come  back  to  his  theatre 
activity,  in  spite  of  other  interests.  In  the 
meantime,  we  would  like  to  remind  Mr. 
Duncan  that  "What  the  Picture  Did  for 
Me"  is  a reciprocal  arrangement,  and  per- 
haps Harland  Rankin,  and  other  readers 
would  like  to  see  comments  from  Chatta- 
nooga in  this  original  department  of  ex- 
hibitor reports  — established  in  1916,  for 
mutual  aid  and  benefit,  so  theatre  men  can 
serve  one  another. 


bill  it  with  something  for  your  adults. — James  Hardy, 
Shoals  Theatre,  Shoals,  Tnd. 

Twentieth  Century-Fox 

CALL  NORTHSIDE  777:  James  Stewart,  Richard 
Conte — Although  this  has  a good  cast,  it  didn’t  do 
above  average  business.  Played  Monday,  Tuesday, 
December  5,  6. — Harland  Rankin,  Rankin  Enterprises, 
Chatham.  Ont.,  Canada. 

HOW  TO  BE  VERY,  VERY  POPULAR:  Betty 
Grable.  Robert  Cummings,  Sheree  North— This  ] 
thought  good  comedy,  good  music  and  color.  Well 
liked  and  should  do  extra  business  anywhere. — Har- 
land Rankin.  Rankin  Enterprises,  Chatham,  Out.. 
Canada. 

SEVEN  CITIES  OF  GOLD;  Richard  Egan.  An 
thony  Quinn — I thought  this  a very  good  picture, 
but  it  didn’t  seem  to  take.  Played  Thursday,  Fri- 


day, Saturday,  December  15,  16,  17.— Harland  Rankin, 
Rankin  Enterprises,  Chatham,  Ont.,  Canada. 

VIEW  FROM  POMPEY'S  HEAD,  THE:  Richard 
Egan,  Dana  Wynter — This  one  failed  us  during  the 
week  before  Christmas. — Hugh  G.  Martin,  Palace 
Tlieatre.  Leesburg,  Fla. 


United  Artists 


BIG  KNIFE,  THE:  Jack  Falance.  Ida  Lupino— 
I cannot  say  what  I’d  really  like  to  about  this  one, 
but  the  producer  who  thought  this  one  up  should 
have  to  sleep  with  the  print  the  rest  of  his  life — 
walkouts,  squawks  and  more  walkouts  greeted  us 
on  Friday  and  Saturday  before  Christmas.  We  gave 
three-ninths  on  our  week  and  failed  to  do  expenses 
before  film  rental.  In  fact,  a new  low  was  established 
on  Saturday — the  first  time  a Saturday  has  ever 
done  35%  less  than  a Friday.  Instead  of  paying 
percentage  for  this  one,  the  producer  should  be  sued 
for  making  our  patrons  lose  confidence  *n  our  ability  to 
please.  Not  for  the  small  town.  Exhibitors,  beware! 
—Hugh  G.  Martin,  Palace  Theatre,  Leesburg,  Fla. 

MARTY : Ernest  Borgnine,  Betsy  Blair — The  ones 
who  requested  this  didn’t  show  up;  those  who  came 
were  pleased  mightily.  I missed  the  boat  in  whipping 
up  much  enthusiasm  for  it.  Played  Tuesday,  Wednes- 
day. December  6,  7. — Mrs.  Elaine  S.  George,  Star 
Theatre,  Heppner,  Ore. 

ROBBER’S  ROOST:  George  Montgomery — Not 

much  of  a picture,  but  drew  moderateK*  web.  J 
wish  someone  would  start  on  all  the  Zane  Greys 
again  and  give  them  production  values  commensurate 
with  their  drawing  power  in  the  western  fan  belt. 
Played  Thursday,  Friday,  Saturday.  Deceml>er  8,  9. 
10. — Mrs.  Elaine  S.  George.  Star  Theatre.  Heppner, 
Ore. 


Universal 


TO  HELL  AND  BACK:  Audie  Murphy,  Marshall 
Thompson — Did  better  than  average  business.  Evi- 
dently it  did  not  play  every  drive-in  double  feature 
in  nearby  Jacksonville  ahead  of  our  date. — Hugh  G. 
^lartin,  Clay  Theatre,  Green  Cove  Springs,  Fla. 


Warner  Bros. 


McConnell  story,  THE:  June  Allyson.  Alan 

Ladd — Very  good  story  and  did  nice  holiday  business 
on  it.  Seemed  to  satisfy  all.  Plaved  Monday.  Tues- 
ay,  Wenesday,  December  26,  27,  28. — Harland  Rankin. 
Rankin  Enterprises,  Chatham,  t^nt.,  Canada. 

MISTER  ROBERTS:  Henry  Fonda.  James  Cagney 
— Here  is  one  of  the  best  comedies  I’ve  seen  in  some 
time.  Did  build-up  business  and  had  everybodv  talk- 
ing about  it.  Give  it  extra  time. — Harland  Rankin, 
Rankin  Enterprises,  Chatham,  Ont.,  Canada. 

PETE  KELLY’S  BLUES;  Jack  Webb,  Janet  Leigh 
— This  proved  to  be  a crowd  getter  and  thev  seemed 
to  enjoy  it.  Played  Tliursday.  Friday.  Saturday. 
December  1,  2,  3. — Harland  Rankin,  Rankin  Enter- 
prises, Chatham,  Ont.,  Canada. 

SEA  CHASE,  THE:  John  Wayne.  L^na  Turner — 
Excellent  picture.  Lana  Turner  and  Wayne  do  a 
real  good  job.  Audience  was  enthusiastic. — Harland 
Rankin,  Rankin  Enterprises,  Chatham,  Ont.,  Canada. 


PRODUCT  DIGEST  SECTION.  JANUARY  14,  1956 


739 


THE  RELEASE  CHART 


Index  to  Reviews  and  Advance  Synopses,  with  Ratings 


Release  dates  and  running  time  are  furnished  as  soon  as  avail- 
able. Advance  dates  are  tentative  and  subject  to  change.  Run- 
ning times  are  the  official  times  supplied  by  the  distributor. 

All  page  numbers  in  this  chart  refer  to  pages  in  the  PRODUCT 
DIGEST  SECTION. 

Short  Subjects  Chart  December  31,  page  722. 

Features  by  Company  January  14,  1956,  page  745. 

Color  pictures  designated  by  (c). 

Legion  of  Decency  Ratings:  A- 1,  Unobjectionable;  A-2,  Unobjec- 
tionable for  Adults;  B,  Objectionable  in  part  for  all;  C,  Condemned. 


Under  the  column  heading  Special  Data  projection  and  available 
sound  systems  are  designated  by  the  follov/ing  keys:  SYSTEM:  CS 
— CinemaScope;  VV — Vista  Vision;  SA — SuperScope  (anamorphic 
print);  3D — two  prints;  3D(I) — single  strip.  SOUND:  Ss — Four 
frack  magnetic  stereophonic  sound;  Ss(2) — Separate  stereophonic 
sound  print;  Ds — Optical  directional  sound,  as  Perspecta;  Ms — 
single  track  magnetic  sound;  Os — standard  optical  sound. 

All  films  (except  CinemaScope)  made  in  Hollywood  since  early 
1953  are  intended  for  aspect  ratios  from  1.33  to  I up  to  approxi- 
mately 1.75  to  I. 

*Following  a title  indicates  a Box  Office  Champion. 


Release 

Running 

^REVIEWED-^ 

L.  of  D. 

Herald 

Special 

TITLE — Production  Number — Company 

Stars 

Date 

Time 

Issue  Page 

Rating 

Review 

Data 

A 


A & C Meet  the  Mummy  (526) 

Univ. 

Abbott  and  Costello 

June, '55 

79m 

May  7 

425 

A-l 

Good 

African  Lion  (c)* 

BV 

True  Life  Adventure 

Oct.  I0,'55 

75m 

Aug.  13 

553 

A-l 

Very  Good 

Ain't  Misbehavin'  (529)  (c) 

Univ. 

Rory  Calhoun-Piper  Laurie 

July, '55 

82m 

May  28 

458 

B 

Good 

All  That  Heaven  Allows  (cj  (5609) 

Ul 

Rock  Hudson-Jane  Wyman 

Jan. ,'56 

89m 

Oct.  29 

650 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Apache  Ambush 

Col. 

Bill  Williams-Richard  Jaeckel 

Sept., '55 

68m 

Sept.  3 

577 

A-2 

Fair 

Apache  Woman  (c) 

ARC 

Lloyd  Bridqes-Joan  Taylor 

Oct.,'55 

83m 

Oct.  15 

634 

Good 

Appointment  in  London  (Brit.)  Asso.  Art. 

Dirk  Bogarde-Dinah  Sheridan 

Nov., '55 

96m 

Jan.  14 

738 

Good 

Artists  and  Models  (c)  (VV)  (5510) 

Para. 

Dean  Martin-Jerry  Lewis 

Jan. ,'56 

1 09m 

Nov.  12 

665 

B 

Good 

At  Gunpoint  (5531)  (c)  (CS) 

AA 

Fred  MacMurray-Dorothy  Malone 

Dec.  25,'55 

8 1 m 

Dec.  10 

698 

A-l 

Excellent 

B 


Bar  Sinister  (see  It's  a Dog's  Life) 

MGM 

Jeff  Richards-Jarma  Lewis 

Sept.  23,'55 

88m 

Aug.  27 

570 

A-2 

Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Bengazi  (516)  (SS)  (c) 

RKO 

Richard  Conte-Victor  McLaglen 

Sept.  14, '55 

79m 

Oct.  1 

61 1 

A-l 

Fair 

Benny  Goodman  Story,  The  (c)  (5611)  Univ. 

Steve  Allen-Donna  Reed 

Feb. ,'56 

1 1 6m 

Dec.  24 

713 

A-l 

Excellent 

Betrayed  Woman  (5524) 

AA 

Carole  Mathews-Tom  Drake 

July  I7,'55 

70m 

Oct.  15 

634 

B 

Fair 

Big  Bluff,  The 

UA 

John  Bromfield-Martha  Vickers 

July, '55 

70m 

July  30 

538 

B 

Fair 

Big  Knife,  The* 

UA 

Jack  Palance-lda  Lupino 

Nov., '55 

1 1 Im 

B 

Good 

Big  Street,  The  (577) 

RKO 

Henry  Fonda-Lucille  Ball  (reissue 

) June  1 ,'55 

Billy  the  Kid  (c)  (611) 

MGM 

Robt.  Taylor-Brian  Donlevy  (reissue) 

Dec.,'55 

95  m 

Blood  Alley  (CS)  (c)  (502)* 

WB 

John  Wayne-Lauren  Bacall 

Oct.  I,'55 

1 15m 

Sept.  24 

601 

A-2 

Very  Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Bobby  Ware  Is  Missing  (5532) 

AA 

Neville  Brand-Arthur  Franz 

Oct.  23, '55 

66m 

Dec.  3 

689 

A-l 

Fair 

Bold  & the  Brave  (SS) 

RKO 

Wendell  Corey-Mickey  Rooney 

Mar.  14, '56 

A-2 

Bottom  of  the  Bottle  (602-3)  c)  (CS) 

Fox 

Van  Johnson-Joseph  Cotten 

Jan.,'56 

Brain  Machine 

RKO 

Patrick  Barr-Elizabeth  Allan 

Feb.  15, '56 

Brave  One,  The  (CS)  (c) 

RKO 

Michel  Ray-Joi  Lansing 

Dec.  24,'55 

Break  to  Freedom  (Brit.) 

UA 

Anthony  Steel-Jack  Warner 

June, '55 

88m 

July  23 

522 

A-l 

Good 

Bring  Your  Smile  Along  (c)  _ 

Col. 

Frankie  Laine-Keefe  Brasselle 

Aug., '55 

83m 

July  2 

498 

A-l 

Good 

Bringing  Up  Baby  (575) 

RKO 

Katharine  Hepburn-C.  Grant  (reissue 

) May  4,'55 

1 02m 

c 

Carousel  (c)  (CS)  (604-9) 

Gordon  MacRae-Shirley  Jones 

Feb.,'56 

Case  of  the  Red  Monkey  (5521)  (Brit.)  AA 

Richard  Conte-Rona  Anderson 

June  26, '55 

74m 

July  16 

514 

A-l 

Good 

Cash  on  Delivery 

RKO 

Shelley  Winters-Peggy  Cummins 

Jan.  25, '56 

82m 

Cell  2455,  Death  Row 

Col. 

William  Campbell-Robert  Campbell 

May, '55 

77m 

Apr.  16 

401 

B 

Very  Good 

Champion 

Astor 

Kirk  Douglas-Marilyn  Maxwell  (reissue)  June, '55 

99m 

Champion's  Reward  Me 

icDonald 

Jesse  Owens-John  Davis 

Oct.,'55 

60m 

Nov.  5 

658 

Good 

Chicago  Syndicate 

Col. 

Dennis  O'Keefe-Abbe  Lane 

July, '55 

86m 

June  25 

490 

B 

Good 

Circus  Girl  (c) 

Rep. 

Circus  Spectacle  of  India 

Aug. ,'55 

City  of  Shadows  (5436) 

Rep. 

Victor  McLaglen-John  Baer 

June  2, '55 

70m 

Sept.  3 

577 

Fair 

Cobweb,  The  (c)  (CS)  (531) 

MGM 

Lauren  Bacall-Richard  Widmark 

Aug. ,'55 

1 24m 

June  1 1 

473 

A-2 

Very  Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Comanche  (c)  (CS) 

U.A. 

Dana  Andrews-Linda  Cristal 

Mar., '56 

Come  Next  Spring  (c) 

Rep. 

Steve  Cochran-Ann  Sheridan 

Mar. ,'56 

92m 

Conqueror,  The  (CS)  (c) 

RKO 

John  Wayne-Susan  Hayward 

Mar.  28, '56 

1 1 Im 

B 

Count  Three  and  Pray  (c)  (CS) 

Col. 

Van  Heflin-Joanne  Woodward 

Oct.,'55 

1 02m_^ 

Sept.  24 

601 

A-2 

Very  Good  CS-Ss  or  Ds 

Court  Jester,  The  (c)  (VV)  (5512) 

Par. 

Danny  Kaye-Jeanmaire 

Mar., '56 

lOlm 

Court  Martial  (Brit.) 

Kingsley 

David  Niven-Margaret  Leighton 

Aug.,'55 

1 05m 

Aug.  20 

561 

B 

Very  Good 

Court  Martial  of  Billy  Mitchell,  The 

(c)  (CS)  (507) 

WB 

Gary  Cooper-Charles  Bickford 

Dec.  31, '55 

lOOm 

Dec.  10 

697 

A-l 

Excellent 

Creature  with  the  Atom  Brain 

Col. 

Richard  Denning-Angela  Stevens 

July, '55 

70m 

June  18 

483 

A-2 

Fair 

Crooked  Web,  The 

Col. 

Frank  Loveioy-Mari  Blanchard 

Dec.,'55 

77m 

Nov.  26 

681 

A-2 

Excellent 

Cross  Channel  (5441) 

Rep. 

Wayne  Morris-Yvonne  Furneaux 

Sept.  29, '55 

61m 

Nov.  5 

658 

Fair 

740 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  14,  1956 


Release  Running  — REVIEWED — \ L.  of  D.  Herald  Spec/al 

Stars  Date  Time  Issue  Page  Rating  Review  Date 

TiTLE — Production  Number — Company  ’ ’ 


0 


Dam  Busters  (420)  (Brit.) 

WB 

Richard  Todd-Michael  Redgrave 

July  16, '55 

1 02m 

June  25 

490 

A-l 

Good 

Davy  Crockett  |c) 

BV 

Pess  Parker-Buddv  Ebsen 

June, '55 

95m 

May  2 1 

441 

A-l 

Excellent 

Day  the  World  Ended  (SS)  Amer.  Rsig. 

Richard  Denning-Lori  Nelson 

Jan., '56 

80m 

Jan.  14 

738 

Fair 

Deadliest  Sin,  The  (5601) 

AA 

Sydney  Chaplin-Audrey  Dalton 

Jan.  29, '56 

75m 

Deep  Blue  Sea  (c)  (CS)  (527-2)  ( 

Brit.)  Fo» 

Vivien  Leigh-Kenneth  Moore 

Nov.,'55 

99m 

Sept.  24 

601 

B 

Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Oi 

Desert  Sands  (SS)  (c) 

UA 

Ralph  Meeker-Marla  English 

Sept. .'55 

87m 

Aug.  20 

561 

A-2 

Good 

Desperate  Hours,  The  (VV)  (5509) 

Para. 

Humphrey  Bogart-Fredric  March 

Nov.,'55 

1 1 2m 

Sept.  17 

593 

A-2 

Excellent 

W 

Devil  Goddess 

Col. 

Johnny  Weissmuller-Angela  Stevens 

Oct.,'55 

70m 

Aug.  20 

561 

A-l 

Good 

Diabolique  (Pr.) 

UMPO 

Simone  Signoret-Paul  Meurisse 

Dec., '55 

1 07  m 

Jan.  7 

730 

B 

Very  Good 

Diane  (cj  (CS)  (616) 

MGM 

Lana  Turner-Pedro  Armendariz 

Jan.  6, '56 

1 lOm 

Dec.  24 

714 

A-2 

Good 

Dig  That  Uranium  (5541) 

AA 

Leo  Gorcey-Hunti  Hall 

Jan.  8, '56 

61m 

A-l 

Divided  Heart,  The  (Brit.)  (5408) 

Rep. 

Cornell  Borchors-Yvonno  Mitchell 

Auq.  1 1 .'55 

89m 

Aug.  13 

554 

A-l 

Excellent 

Doctor  At  Sea  (Brit.)  (c)  (VV) 

Rep. 

Dirk  Bogarde-Brigitte  Bardot 

Feb.  ,'56 

92m 

Don  Juan's  Night  of  Love 

(Ital.-Eng.  dubbed)  (5435) 

Rep. 

Raf  Vallone-S.  Pampanini 

May, '55 

71m 

June  1 1 

473 

Fair 

Double  Jeopardy  (5437) 

Rep. 

Rod  Cameron-Gale  Robbins 

June, '55 

70m 

Sept.  17 

594 

A-2 

Fair 

Duel  on  the  Mississippi  (c) 

Col. 

Lei  Barker-Patricia  Medina 

Oct..'55 

72m 

Sept.  24 

602 

A-2 

Good 

E 

Eternal  Sea,  The 

Rap. 

Alexis  Smith-Dean  dagger 

May,'55 

1 03  m 

Apr.  9 

393 

A-l 

Very  Good 

F 


Far  Horizons,  The  (c)  (VV) 

(5412) 

Para. 

Charlton  Heston-Fred  MacMurray 

June, '55 

108m 

May  2 1 

441 

A-l 

Good 

W 

Female  on  the  Beach  (536) 

Univ. 

Joan  Crawford-Jeff  Chandler 

Sept.,'55 

97m 

July  16 

513 

B 

Very  Good 

Fighting  Chance,  The  (5532) 

Rep. 

Rod  Cameron-Ben  Cooper 

Dec.  15, '55 

70m 

Jan.  7 

730 

Good 

Finger  Man  (5519) 

AA 

Frank  Lovejoy-Peggie  Castle 

June  19, '55 

82m 

June  18 

482 

B 

Very  Good 

5 Against  the  House 

Col. 

Guy  Madison-Kim  Novak 

June, '55 

84m 

May  14 

434 

B 

Good 

Flame  of  the  Islands  (c) 

Rep. 

Yvonne  de  Carlo-Zachary  Scott 

Jan.,'56 

90m 

Dec.  17 

707 

B 

Fair 

Footsteps  in  the  Fog  (c) 

Col. 

Stewart  Granger-Jean  Simmons 

Sept.,'55 

90m 

Aug.  27 

569 

A-2 

Excellent 

For  Better.  For  Worse  (Brit.) 

(cl  Stratford 

Dirk  Bogarde-Cecil  Parker 

June22,'55 

83m 

Forbidden  Planet  (c)  (CS)  (625) 

MGM 

Anne  Francis-Walter  Pidgeon 

Mar.  30, '56 

Forever  Darling  (620)  (c) 

MGM 

Lucille  Ball-Dezi  Arnaz 

Feb.  I0,'56 

lOOm 

Fort  Yuma  (c) 

UA 

Peter  Graves-Joan  Vohs 

Oct.,'55 

79m 

Oct.  1 

610 

B 

Fair 

Four  Against  Fate  (Brit.) 

Asso. 

Artists 

Anna  Neagle-Michael  Wilding 

Oct.,'55 

84m 

Oct.  29 

650 

Good 

Foxfire  (c)  (528) 

Univ. 

Jeff  Chandler-Jane  Russell 

July, '55 

91m 

June  18 

482 

B 

Good 

Francis  in  the  Navy  (534) 

Univ. 

Donald  O'Connor-Martha  Hyer 

Aug.,'55 

80m 

July  2 

497 

A-l 

Good 

Frisky  ( Ital.) 

DCA 

Gina  Lollobrigida-Vittorio  DeSica 

Nov.,'55 

98m 

Nov.  26 

682 

B 

Fair 

Fury  at  Gunsight  Pass 

Col. 

David  Brian-Richard  Long 

Feb., '56 

68m 

Jan.  14 

737 

A-l 

Good 

Fury  in  Paradise  ( c) 

Fil 

makers 

Peter  Thompson-Rea  Iturbi 

Oct.,'55 

77m 

Nov.  19 

674 

Fair 

C 


Gaby  (c)  (CS)  (627) 

MGM 

Leslie  Caron-John  Kerr 

Apr.  27,'56 

Gentlemen  Marry  Brunettes  (c)  (CS) 

UA 

Jane  Russeil-Jeanne  Crain 

Oct.,'55 

97m 

Sept.  17 

593 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Ghost  Town 

UA 

Kent  Taylor-John  Smith 

Mar.  '56 

75m 

A-l 

Girl  in  the  Red  Velvet  Swing  (c) 

(624-9)  (CS) 

Fox 

Ray  Milland-Joan  Collins 

Oct.,'55 

109m 

Oct.  29 

651 

A-2 

Very  Good  CS-Ss,Ms,Oi 

Girl  Rush.  The  (c)  (W)  (5502) 

Para. 

Rosalind  Russell-Fernando  Lamas 

Sept.,'55 

85m 

Aug.  13 

553 

B 

Very  Good  VV 

Glory  (SS)  (c)  (605) 

RKO 

Margaret  O'Brlen-Walter  Brennan 

Jan.  1 l,'56 

1 00m 

Jan.  14 

737 

Good 

Good  Morning,  Miss  Dove  (c)  (CS) 

(528-0)* 

Fox 

Jennifer  Jones-Robert  Stack 

Nov.,'55 

1 07m 

Nov.  19 

673 

A-l 

Excellent  CS,  Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Great  Adventure  (Swed.-Eno.  Narr.) 

DeRochemont 

Non-professional 

Sept.,'55 

75m 

June  18 

483 

A-l 

Excellent 

Green  Buddha  (5439) 

Rep. 

Wayne  Morris-Mary  Germaine 

July9,'55 

61m 

Dec.  3 1 

721 

Good 

Gun  That  Won  the  West,  The  (c) 

Col. 

tennis  Morgan-Paula  Raymond 

Sept..'55 

V 1 ... 

July  16 

514 

A-l 

Fair 

Guy  Named  Joe,  A (609) 

MGM 

Spencer  Tracy-lrene  Dunne  (reissue) 

Nov.,'55 

1 20m 

Guys  and  Dolls  (c)  (CS)*  (614) 

MGM 

Brando-Sinatra-Simmons-Blaine 

Special 

• *>0m 

Nov.  12 

665 

B 

Superior  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

H 


Headline  Hunters  (5440) 

Rep. 

Kod  Camerun-Julie  Bishop 

6ept.  15, '55 

69m 

Oct.  29 

650 

A-l 

Good 

Heidi  and  Peter  (c) 

(Swiss — Eng.  dubbed) 

UA 

Heinrich-Getler-Elsbeth  Sigmund 

Dec., '55 

89m 

Dec.  3 

689 

A-l 

Fair 

Helen  of  Troy  (c)  (CS)  (510) 

WB 

Rosanna  Podesta-Jack  Sernas 

Feb.  1 1,'56 

1 18m 

Dec.  24 

713 

A-2 

Superior 

Hell  on  Frisco  Bay  (c)  (CS)  (509) 

WB 

Alan  Ladd-Edward  G.  Robinson 

Jan.28,'56 

98m 

Dec.  24 

714 

A-2 

Fair 

Hell's  Horizon 

Col. 

John  Ireland-Marla  English 

Dec.,'55 

80m 

Nov.  26 

681 

A-2 

Good 

Hell's  Island  (c)  (VV)  (5411) 

Para. 

John  Payne-Mary  Murphy 

May, '55 

84m 

May  7 

425 

B 

Good  VV 

Hidden  Guns 

Rep. 

Bruce  Bennett-Rlchard  Arlen 

Jan.,'56 

66m 

Hill  24  Doesn't  Answer  (Israel) 

Sikor 

Edward  Mulhard-Haya  Harait 

Nov.  I5,'55 

102m 

Nov.  26 

681 

Good 

Hold  Back  Tomorrow  (5603) 

Univ. 

Cleo  Moore-John  Agar 

Nov.,'55 

75m 

Oct.  8 

625 

A-2 

Fair 

Home  of  the  Brave 

UA 

Frank  Loveioy-James  Edwards  (reissue)  June, '55 

86m 

Honky  Tonk  (612) 

MGM 

Clark  Gable-Lana  Turner  (reissue) 

Dec.,'55 

104m 

House  of  Bamboo  (c)  (CS)  (516-5) 

Fox 

Robert  Stack-Robert  Ryan 

July, '55 

1 02m 

July  2 

497 

A-2 

Very  Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Houston  Story,  The 

Col. 

Gene  Barry-Edward  Arnold 

Feb.'56 

79m 

Jan.  7 

730 

B 

Fair 

How  to  Be  Very,  Very  Popular 

(c)  (CS)  (518-1)* 

Fox 

Betty  Grable-Sherae  North 

July,'55 

89m 

July  23 

521 

B 

Very  Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

I 


1 Am  A Camera 

DCA 

Julio  Harris-Lauronce  Harvey 

Aug.  4,'55 

98m 

Aug.  6 

545 

C Fair 

1 Cover  the  Underworld  (54341 
1 Died  A Thousand  Timas  (c)  (CS) 

Rep. 

Sean  McClory-Joanne  Jordan 

May,"55 

70m 

Apr.  30 

417 

Fair 

(505) 

WB 

Jack  Palance-Shelley  Winters 

Nov.  12, '55 

1 09m 

Oct.  15 

633 

A-2  Very  Good  CS-Ss,  Ms.  Os 

741 


PRODUCT  DIGEST  SECTION,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


Release  Running  r-REVIEWED—\  L.  of  D.  Herald  Special 


TITLE — Production  Number — Company 

Stars 

Date 

Time 

Issue 

Page 

Rating  Review 

Data 

1 Remember  Mama  (576) 

RKO 

Irene  Dunne-B.  Bel  Geddes  (reissue]  May  18, '55 

I’ll  Cry  Tomorrow  (c)  (CS)  (615) 

MGM 

Susan  Hayward-Eddie  Albert 

Special 

Il7m 

Dec.  17 

70S 

A-2 

Excellent 

Illegal  (503) 

WB 

Edward  G.  Robinson-Nina  Foch 

Oct.  15. '55 

88m 

Sept.  3 

577 

A-2 

Fair 

Indian  Fighter,  The  (c)  (CS) 

UA 

Kirk  Douglas-Elsa  Martinelli 

Dec., '55 

88m 

Dec.  24 

713 

B 

Very  Good 

Inside  Detroit 

Col. 

Dennis  O’Keefe-Pat  O'Brien 

Jan. ,'56 

82m 

Dec.  17 

706 

A-2 

Fair 

Interrupted  Melody  (c)  (CS)  (529)* 
Invasion  of  the  Body  Snatchers  (SS) 

MGM 

Glenn  Ford-Eleanor  Parker 

July  1 ,'55 

106m 

Mar.  26 

377 

A-2 

Excellent 

CS-Ss  or  Ds 

(5602) 

AA 

Kevin  McCarthy-Dana  Wynter 

Feb.  5,'56 

80m 

It  Came  from  Beneath  the  Sea 

It's  a Dog's  Life  (reviewed  under  title 

Col. 

Kenneth  Tobey-Faith  Domergue 

July, '55 

80m 

June  18 

482 

A-l 

Good 

The  Bar  Sinister)  (c)  (CS)  (603) 

MGM 

Jeff  Richards-Jarma  Lewis 

Dec.23,'55 

88m 

Aug.  27 

570 

A-2 

Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

It's  Always  Fair  Weather  (c)  (CS) 

(601)* 

MGM 

Gene  Kelly-Cyd  Charissa 

Sept.  2, '55 

102m 

Aug.  27 

569 

A-2 

Excellent 

CS-Ss  or  Ds 

I 


Jaguar  (553  1 ) 

Rep. 

Sabu-Chiquita 

Jan. ,'56 

66m 

Jail  Busters  (5529) 

AA 

Leo  Gorcy-Huntr  Hall 

Sept.  18, '55 

61m 

Oct.  1 

610 

A-2 

Good 

Joe  Macbeth 

Col. 

Paul  Douglas-Ruth  Roman 

Feb.,'56 

90m 

Julius  Caesar  (422) 

MGM 

Brando,  Calhern,  Garson,  Kerr, 

Mason  Spec. 

I2lm 

June  6,'53 

1861 

A-l 

Superior 

K 


Kentuckian,  The  (c)  (CS)* 
Killer  Is  Loose 

UA 

UA 

Burt  Lancaster-Dianne  Foster 

Joseph  Cotten-Rhonda  Fleming 

Aug. ,‘55 
Feb.,'56 

1 04m 
73m 

July  16 

513 

B 

Very  Good 

Killer's  Kiss 

UA 

Frank  Silvers-Jamie  Smith 

Nov. ,'55 

67m 

Sept.  24 

602 

B 

Fair 

King  Dinosaur  (5418) 

Lippert 

Bill  Bryant-Wanda  Curtis 

June  I7,‘55 

59m 

Sept.  24 

602 

Fair 

King's  Thief,  The  (c)  (CS)  (532) 

MGM 

Edmund  Purdom-Ann  Blyth 

Aug.  5. ‘55 

79m 

July  23 

522 

A-l 

Good  CS-Ss  or  Ds 

Kismet  (c)  (CS)  (613) 

MGM 

Howard  Keel-Ann  Blyth 

Dec.23,'55 

Il3m 

Dec.  10 

698 

A-2 

Excellent 

Kiss  of  Fire  (c) 

Univ. 

Jack  Palance-Barbara  Rush 

Oct.,'55 

87m 

Aug.  27 

570 

A-2 

Fair 

L 


Lady  and  the  Tramp  (CS)  (c)* 

B.V. 

Cartoon  Feature 

July,'55 

Nov.,'55 

75m 

Apr.  23 

409 

A-l 

Excellent 

CS 

Lady  Godiva  (5601)  (c) 

Univ. 

Maureen  O'Hara-George  Nader 

89m 

Oct.  15 

634 

A-2 

Good 

Land  of  the  Pharaohs  (419)  (c)  (CS) 

* WB 

Jack  Hawkins-Joan  Collins 

July  2, '55 

105m 

June  25 

489 

B 

Excellent 

CS-Ss 

Last  Command,  The  (c)  (5407) 

Rep. 

S.  Hayden-Anna  Maria  Alberghetti 

Aug.  3, '55 

1 1 Om 

July  30 

537 

A-l 

Very  Good 

Last  Frontier,  The  (c)  (CS) 

Col. 

Victor  Mature-Guy  Madison 

Jan. ,'56 

98m 

Dec.  17 

706 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Last  Hunt,  The  (c)  (CS)  (621)  1 

MGM 

Robert  Taylor-Stewart  Granger 

Feb.  24,'56 

108m 

Lawless  Street,  A (c) 

Col. 

Randolph  Scott-Angela  Lansbury 

Dec.,'55 

78m 

Nov.  19 

674 

B 

Good 

Lay  That  Rifle  Down  (5438) 

Rep. 

Judy  Canova-Robert  Lowery 

July  7,'55 

71m 

Oct.  29 

651 

A-l 

Fair 

Lease  of  Life  (Brit.)  (c) 

Left  Hand  of  God,  The  (CS)  (c) 

IFE 

Robert  Donat-Kay  Walsh 

Jan.,'56 

93m 

Dec.  3 1 

721 

Good 

(520-7)* 

Fox 

Humphrey  Bogart-Gene  Tierney 

Sept., '55 

87m 

Aug.  27 

569 

A-2 

Very  Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Let's  Make  Up  (c)  (Brit.) 

UA 

Errol  Flynn-Anna  Neagle 

Feb.,'56 

72m 

A-2 

Letters  From  My  Windmill  (Fr.) 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts  (CS)  (c) 

Tohan 

Henri  Vilbert-Roger  Crouzet 

Feb.,'56 

1 1 6m 

(601-5) 

Fox 

Tom  Ewell-Sheree  North 

Jan.,'56 

99m 

Jan.  7 

729 

B 

Good 

Life  in  the  Balance,  A (506-6) 

Fox 

Ricardo  Montalban-Anne  Bancroft 

July, '55 

74m 

Jan.  22 

297 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Littlest  Outlaw,  The  (c) 

BV 

Pedro  Armendariz-Joseph  Calleia 

Feb.,'56 

75m 

Dec.  24 

713 

A-l 

Excellent 

Living  Swamp  (c)  (CS)  (512-4) 

Fox 

Portrayal  of  Nature 

July,'55 

33m 

July  9 

505 

CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Lone  Ranger,  The  (c)  (511) 

WB 

Clayton  Moore-Jay  Silverheels 

Feb.  25, '56 

86m 

Jan.  7 

729 

Good 

Lonesome  Trail  (5416)  Lippert 

Wayne  Morris-John  Agar 

July  1 ,'55 

73m 

Sept.  17 

594 

Poor 

Lord  of  the  Jungle  (5518) 

AA 

Johnny  Sheffield-Wayne  Morris 

June  12, '55 

69m 

Oct.  1 

610 

A-l 

Fair 

Lost  Continent  (c) 

Love  Is  a Many-Splendored  Thing 

IFE 

Documentary 

Mar. ,'56 

86m 

(c)  (CS)  (521-5)* 

Fox 

William  Holden-Jennifer  Jones 

Aug, ,'55 

1 02m 

Aug.  13 

553 

B 

Excellent  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Love  Me  or  Leave  Me  (CS)  (c)  (527)* 

MGM 

Doris  Day-James  Cagney 

June, '55 

122m 

May  28 

457 

B 

Excellent  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Lover  Boy  (revised;  reviewed  under  titi 

e 

Lovers,  Happy  Lovers)  (526-4) 

Fox 

Gerard  Philipe-Valerie  Hobson 

Oct.,'55 

85m 

Nov.  13, '54 

210 

B 

Lucy  Gallant  (VV)  (c)  (5504) 

Para. 

Jane  Wyman-Charlton  Heston 

Dec.,'55 

104m 

Oct.  1 

609 

A-l 

Very  Good 

W 

M 

Madame  Butterfly  (c) 

IFE 

Kaoru  Yachlgusa 

Mar., '56 

Maddalena  (Ital.)  (c) 

IFE 

Marta  Toren-Gino  Cervi 

Dec.,'55 

90m 

Magic  Fire  (c) 

Magnificent  Matador,  The  (c)  (CS) 

Rep. 

Yvonne  de  Carlo-Carlos  Thompson 

Feb.,'56 

90m 

(513-2) 

Fox 

Maureen  O'Hara-Anthony  Quinn 

June, '55 

94m 

May  21 

442 

B 

Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Man  Alone,  A (c) 

Rep. 

Ray  Mllland-Mary  Murphy 

Oct.,'55 

96m 

Sept.  24 

601 

A-2 

Excellent 

Man  From  Bitter  Ridge,  The  (c)  (525)  Univ. 

Lex  Barker-Mara  Corday 

June, '55 

80m 

Apr,  23 

410 

A-l 

Fair 

Man  From  Laramie,  The  (c)  (CS)* 
Man  in  the  Gray  Flannel  Suit  (606-4) 

Col. 

James  Stewart-Arthur  Kennedy 

Aug. ,'55 

104m 

July  2 

497 

A-2 

Excellent  . 

CSs,  Ss  or  Ds 

(c)  (CS) 

Fox 

Gregory  Peck-Jennifer  Jones 

Mar. ,'56 

Fair 

Man  Who  Loved  Redheads  (c)  (Brit. 

) UA 

Moira  Shearer-John  Justin 

July,'55 

89m 

July  30 

538 

B 

Man  Who  Never  Was  (603- 1 ) ( c)  ( CS)  Fox 

Clifton  Webb-Gloria  Grahame 

Feb.,'56 

Man  With  the  Golden  Arm,  The 

UA 

Frank  Sinatra-Eleanor  Parker 

Jan. '56 

1 19m 

Dec.  17 

706 

B 

Good 

Man  With  the  Gun,  The 

UA 

Robert  Mitchum-Jan  Sterling 

Nov.,'55 

83m 

Oct.  15 

633 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Manfish  (c) 

U.A. 

Victor  Jory-John  Bromfield 

Feb.,'56 

76m 

Marty* 

UA 

Ernest  Borgnine-Betsy  Blair 

Mar., '55 

9 1 m 

Mar.  26 

377 

A-2 

Very  Good 

CS-Ss  or  Ms 

McConnell  Story,  The  (CS)  (c)  (501) 
Meet  Me  in  Las  Vegas  (c)  (CS) 

WB 

June  Allyson-Alan  Ladd 

Sept.  3, '55 

1 07m 

Aug.  13 

553 

A-l 

Very  Good 

(622) 

MGM 

Cyd  Charisse-Dan  Dailey 

Mar.  9,'56 

CS-Ss  or  Ms 

Mister  Roberts  (CS)  fc)  (418)* 

WB 

Henry  Fonda-James  Cagney 

July  30,'55 

123m 

May  28 

457 

B 

Excellent 

Moonfleet  (CS)  (c)  (528) 

MGM 

Stewart  Granger- Viveca  Lindfors 

June  24, '55 

89m 

May  14 

433 

B 

Very  Good 

Cs-Ss  or  Ds 

My  Sister  Eileen  (c)  (CS) 

Col. 

Janet  Leigh-Jack  Lemmon 

Oct.,'55 

lOflm 

Sept.  10 

585 

B 

Excellent 

CS,  Ss  or  Di 

Mystery  of  the  Black  Jungle  (5442) 

Rep. 

Lex  Barker 

Oct.  20.'55 

72m 

742 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  14,  I95& 


Release 

Running 

r-REVIEWEDs 

L.  of  0.  Herald 

Special 

TITLE — Production  Number— 

|k| 

-Compony 

Stars 

Date 

Time 

Issue 

Page 

Rating  Review 

Data 

N 

Naked  Dawn,  The  (5602)  (c) 

Univ. 

Arthur  Kennedy-Betta  St.  John 

Nov.,'55 

82m 

July  30 

538 

B 

Fair 

Naked  Sea  (c)  (604) 

RKO 

Documentary 

Dec.  1 3, '55 

70m 

Nov.  5 

657 

A-l 

Good 

Naked  Street,  The 

UA 

Farley  Granger-Anthony  Quinn 

Aug. ,'55 

84m 

Aug.  13 

554 

A-2 

Good 

Night  Freight  (5526) 

AA 

Forrest  Tucker-Barbara  Britton 

Aug.  28, '55 

80m 

Aug.  20 

561 

A-2 

Fair 

Night  Holds  Terror,  The 

Col. 

Jack  Kelly-Hildy  Parks 

Sept., '55 

86m 

July  16 

513 

B 

Very  Good 

NIaht  Mv  Number  Came  Up,  The 

( Brit. ) 

Cont.  Dist. 

Michael  Redgrave-Alexander  Knox 

Feb.  21, '56 

94m 

Jan.  14 

737 

Very  Good 

Night  of  the  Hunter,  The 

UA 

Robert  Mitchum-Shelley  Winters 

Sept., '55 

93m 

July  23 

522 

B 

Very  Good 

No  Man's  Woman  (5445) 

Rep. 

Marie  Windsor-Patric  Knowles 

Oct.  27,'55 

70m 

Nov.  19 

674 

Good 

No  Place  to  Hide  (c)  (5603) 

A.A. 

David  Brian-Marsha  Hunt 

Feb.26,'56 

72m 

Northwest  Passage  (c)  (623) 

MGM 

S.  Tracy-Robt.  Young  (reissue) 

Mar.,'56 

126m 

Not  as  a Stranger* 

UA 

Robert  Mitchum-Olivia  de  Havilland 

July, '55 

1 35m 

June  18 

481 

B 

Excellent 

0 

Oklahoma!  (c)  (Todd-AO) 

Magna 

Gordon  MacRae-Gloria  Grahame 

Special 

145m 

Oct.  29 

651 

B 

Superior 

On  the  Threshold  of  Space  (605-6) 

(c)  (CS) 

Fox 

John  Hodiak-Virginia  Leith 

Mar.,'56 

One  Desire  (c)  (532) 

Univ. 

Anne  Baxter-Rock  Hudson 

Aug. ,'55 

94m 

July  9 

505 

A-2 

Fair 

One  Minute  to  Zero 

RKO 

Robt.  Mitchum-Ann  Blyth  (reissue) 

Mar.  21, '56 

105m 

Operation  Mal-'-a  iBrit.) 

A.R.C. 

Documentary 

Oct.  25,'55 

65m 

Nov.  5 

658 

Fair 

Othello 

UA 

Orson  Welles-Suianne  Cloutier 

June, '55 

92m 

June  4 

465 

A-2 

Good 

P 

Paris  Follies  of  1956  (c)  (5534) 

AA 

Forest  Tucker-Barbara  Whiting 

Nov.  27,'55 

73m 

Dec.  31 

721 

Fair 

Patterns 

U.A. 

Van  Heflin-Ed.  Begley 

Mar.,'56 

Pearl  of  the  South  Pacific 

(SS)  (c)  (515) 

RKO 

Virginia  Mayo-Dennis  Morgan 

July  4, '55 

85m 

July  9 

505 

A-2 

Good 

Pete  kelly's  Blues  (421)  (c)  (CS)* 

WB 

Jack  Webb-Janet  Leigh 

Aug.27,'55 

95m 

Aug.  6 

545 

B 

Excellent 

CS-Ss  or  Ms 

Petty  Girl,  The 

Col. 

Robert  Cummings-Joan  Caulfield 

(reissue)  June,  55 

87m 

Phantom  from  10,000  Leagues 

Amer.  Rsig. 

Cathy  Downs-Kent  Taylor 

Jan. ,'56 

80m 

Jan.  14 

738 

Fair 

Phenix  City  Story,  The  (5525)* 

AA 

Richard  Kiley-Kathryn  Grant 

Aug.  14, '55 

lOOm 

July  23 

521 

B 

Excellent 

Picnic  (c)  (CS) 

Col. 

William  Holden-Rosalind  Russell 

Feb.,'56 

1 15m 

Dec.  10 

697 

Excellent 

Postmark  for  Danger 

RKO 

Terry  Moore-Robert  Beatty 

Jan.  1 8, '56 

84m 

Prisoner,  The  ( Brit.) 

Col. 

Alec  Guinness-Jack  Hawkins 

Dec., '55 

91m 

Dec.  17 

705 

A-2 

Good 

Private  War  of  Major  Benson  (c) 

(533)  Univ. 

Charlton  Heston-Julie  Adams 

Aug. ,'55 

1 05m 

May  28 

457 

A-l 

Excellent 

Priie  of  Gold,  A (c) 

Col. 

Richard  Widmark-Mai  Zetterling 

June, '55 

98m 

May  1 4 

435 

B 

Fair 

Purple  Mask,  The  (CS)  (c)  (530) 

Univ. 

Tony  Curtis-Coleen  Miller 

July, '55 

82m 

June  4 

465 

A-l 

Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Queen  Bee 

Col. 

Joan  Crawford-Barry  Sullivan 

Nov.,'55 

95m 

Oct.  22 

641 

B 

Very  Good 

Quentin  Durward  (CS)  (c)  (607) 

MGM 

Robert  Taylor-Kay  kendall 

Oct.  21, '55 

lOlm 

Oct.  15 

633 

A-l 

Very  Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

R 

Rains  of  Ranchipur,  The  (c)  (CS) 


(529-8) 

Fox 

Lana  Turner-Richard  Burton 

Dec., '55 

1 04m 

Dec.  17 

705 

A-2 

Excellent 

Ransom!  (617) 

MGM 

Glenn  Ford-Donna  Reed 

Jan.  20,'56 

104m 

Jan.  7 

729 

A-2 

Good 

Rebecca 

RKO 

Laurence  Olivier-Joan  Fontaine  1 

(reissue)  Mar.  7, '56 

130m 

Rebel  Without  a Cause  (CS)  (c) 

(504)  WB 

James  Dean-Natalle  Wood 

Oct.  29,'55 

1 1 1 m 

Oct.  22 

641 

A-2 

Very  Good  Cs-Ss  or  Ms 

Return  of  Don  Camillo  (Fr.) 

IFE 

Fernandel 

Dec.,'55 

1 1 5m 

Return  of  Jack  Slade.  The  (SS) 

AA 

John  Ericson-Marl  Blanchard 

Oct.  9, '55 

79m 

Oct.  29 

650 

A-2 

Very  Good 

River  Changes  (513) 

W.B. 

Rosana  Roly-Harold  Marisch 

Mar.  24,'56 

91m 

Riviera  (c)  (Ital.) 

IFE 

Martine  Carol-Rat  Vallone 

Jan., '56 

88m 

Road  to  Denver  (c)  (5406) 

Rep. 

John  Payne-Mona  Freeman 

June, '55 

90m 

July  2 

498 

Good 

Rose  Tattoo,  The  (VV)  (5511) 

Para. 

Burt  Lancaster-Anna  Magnani 

Feb.,'56 

1 17m 

Nov.  5 

657 

B 

Very  Good 

Running  Wild  (5604) 

Univ. 

William  Campbell-Mamie  Van 

Doren  Dec.,'55 

8 1 m 

Nov.  5 

658 

B 

Fair 

s 


Samurai  (c)  (Jap.)  Fine 

Arts 

Toshiro  Mifune 

Nov.,'55 

92m 

Nov.  26 

682 

Good 

Savage  Princess  (c)  (Indian) 

UA 

Dilip  Kumar-Mimmi 

Oct.,'55 

lOlm 

Scarlet  Coat,  The  (CS)  (c)  (533)  MGM 

Cornel  Wilde-Anne  Francis 

Aug.  I9,'55 

1 0 1 m 

June  25 

489 

A-2 

Good 

CS-Ss  or  Ms 

Sea  Chase,  The  (c)  (CS)  (416)* 

WB 

John  Wayne-Lana  Turner 

June  4,'55 

1 17m 

May  14 

433 

B 

Very  Good 

Cs-Ss 

Sea  Shall  Not  Have  Them,  The  (Brit.) 

UA 

Michael  Redgrave-Dirk  Bogarde 

June, '55 

9 1 m 

June  4 

465 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Second  Greatest  Sex  (5606)  (c)  (CS) 

Univ. 

Jeanne  Crain-George  Nader 

Dec.,'55 

87m 

Oct.  8 

625 

B 

Very  Good 

Secret  Venture  (5443) 

Rep. 

Kent  Taylor-Jane  Hylton 

Nov.  I0,'55 

68m 

Nov.  26 

681 

Fair 

Seven  Cities  of  Gold  (c)  (CS)  (522-3) 

Fox 

Richard  Egan-Michael  Rennie 

Sept.,'55 

103m 

Sept.  17 

593 

A-l 

Very  Good 

Seven  Little  Foys  (c)  (VV)  (5413)* 

Para. 

Bob  Hope-MIlly  Vitale 

July, '55 

95m 

June  4 

466 

A-2 

Excellent 

VV 

Seven  Year  Itch,  The  (c)  (CS)  (517-3)* 

Fox 

Marilyn  Monroe-Tom  Ewell 

June, '55 

105m 

June  1 1 

473 

B 

Very  Good  CS-Ss,  Ms,  Os 

Shack  Out  On  101  (5535) 

AA 

Terry  Moore-Frank  Lovejoy 

Dec.  4,'55 

80m 

Dec.  3 

689 

B 

Good 

Shadow  of  the  Eagle  (Brit.) 

UA 

Richard  Greene-Valentina  Cortesa 

July, '55 

93m 

Sept.  10 

585 

A-2 

Fair 

Sheep  Has  Five  Legs  (French) 

United  Mot.  Pic. 

Org.  . 

Fernandel 

Aug. ,'55 

93m 

Aug.  27 

570 

Very  Good 

Shepherd  of  the  Hills  (c)  (5507) 

Para. 

John  Wayne-Betty  Field  (reissue)  Oct. ,'55 

97m 

/ 

Shrike,  The  ( 535) 

Univ. 

Jose  Ferrer-June  Allyson 

Sept.,'55 

88m 

May  1 4 

433 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Simba  (c)  (Brit.)  (5421)  Lippert 

Dirk  Bogarde 

Sept.  9, '55 

99m 

Sept.  3 

577 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Sincerely  Yours  (c)  (506) 

WB 

LIberace-Joanne  Dru 

Nov.26,'55 

1 15m 

Oct.  29 

649 

A-l 

Excellent 

Slightly  Scarlet  (SA)  (c) 

RKO 

John  Payne-Rhonda  Fleming 

Feb.  8, '56 

99m 

Soldier  of  Fortune  (CS)  (c)  (514-0)* 

Fox 

Clark  Gable-Susan  Hayward 

June, '55 

96m 

May  28 

458 

B 

Very  Good 

Son  of  SInbad  (c)  (SA) 

RKO 

Dale  Robertson-Sally  Forrest 

June  l,'55 

88m 

June  4 

466 

C 

Fair 

SA 

Special  Delivery 

Col. 

Joseph  Cotten-Eva  Bartok 

Sept.,'55 

86m 

July  30 

537 

A-2 

Good 

Spoilers,  The  (c)  (5607) 

Univ. 

Anne  Baxter-Jeff  Chandler 

Jan. ,'56 

84m 

Dec.  10 

698 

A-2 

Very  Good 

Spy  Chasers  (5522) 

AA 

Leo  Gorcey-Huntx  Hall 

July  24,'55 

6 1 m 

Aug.  13 

554 

A-l 

Good 

PRODUCT  DIGEST  SECTION,  JANUARY  14,  1956 


743 


title — Production  Number — Company 


Square  Jungle,  The  (5608)  Univ. 

Steel  Jungle  (514)  VV.B. 

Strategic  Air  Command  (VV)  (cl 
, (5425)* 

Stratton  Story  (619)  MGM 

Storm  Fear 

Sudden  Danger  (5540)  AA 

Summertime  (c)  |JA 

Svengali  (c)  (Brit.)  (602)  MGM 

T 

Tall  Men  Riding  (c)  (4173)  WB 

Tall  Men,  The  (c)  (CS)  (523-1)*  Fox 

Tarantula  (5605)  Univ. 

Target  Zero  (508)  VVB 

Tecitman  Mystery,  The  (Brit.)  Asso.  Artists 
Teen-Age  Crime  Wave  Col. 

Tender  Trap,  The  (CS)  (c)*  (608)  MGM 
Tennessee's  Partner  (SS)  (c)  RKO 

Texas  Lady  (c)  (SS)  (603)  RKO 

That  Lady  (c)  (CS)  (504-1)  Fox 

There's  Always  Tomorrow  (5610)  Univ. 

They  All  Kissed  the  Bride  Col 

Thirty  Seconds  Over  Tokyo  (610)  MGM 
This  Island  Earth  (c)*  (527)  Univ. 

This  Man  is  Dangerous  (Fr.-Eng.  Dubbed) 

Fortune 

This  Strange  Passion  (Max.)  Omnia 

Three  Bad  Sisters  UA 

Three  Musketeers,  The  (c)  (618)  MGM 
Three  Stripes  in  the  Sun  Col. 

Thunderstorm  (5604)  A.A. 

Time  Slip  (5530)  AA 

To  Catch  a Thief  (VV)  (c)  (5502)*  P.ra. 
To  Hell  and  Back  (c)  (CS)*  Univ. 

Too  Bad  She  s Bad  (Ital.)  Kingsley 

Top  Gun  UA 

Toughest  Man  Alive  (5533)  AA 

Track  the  Man  Down  Rep. 

Trail  of  the  Lonesome  Pine  (c)  (5506)  Para. 
Treasure  of  Pancho  Villa  (601)  (c)  (SS)  RKO 
Trial  (604)*  MGM 

Tribute  to  a Bad  Man  (626)  (c)  (CS)  MGM 
Trouble  With  Harry  (c)  fW)  (5508)  Para. 
Twinkle  in  God's  Eye,  The  (5444)  Rep. 

u 

Ulysses  (c)  (5408)*  Para. 

Umberto  D (Ital.)  Harrison 

Unconquftred  (c  ) (5505)  Para. 

V 

Vanishing  American,  The  (c)  (5501)  Rep. 
View  From  Pompey's  Head.  The  (c)  (CS) 
(525-6)  Fox 

Virgin  Queen.  The  (c)  (CS)  (519-9)  Fox 

w 

Wakamba  (c)  (514)  RKO 

Walk  A Crooked  Mile  Col. 

Warriors.  The  (c)  (5523)  (CS)  AA 

We're  No  Angels  (VV)  (c)  (5414)  Para. 
When  Gangland  Strikes  Rep. 

White  Christmas  (c)  (VV)*  (5429R)  Para. 
Wichita  (c)  (5520)  (CS)  AA 

Wicked  Wife  (5606)  (Brit.)  AA 

Will  Any  Gentleman?  (cl  (Brit.)  Stratford 
Wiretapper  Continental 

Wizard  of  Oz,  The  (c)  (530)  MGM 

World  Without  End  (CS)  (c)  (5607)  AA 

X-Y-Z 

Yearling,  The  (c)  (624)  MGM 

Toure  Never  Too  Young 

(c)  (VV)  (5415)  Para. 


Release 

Stars  Date 

Tony  Curtis-Pat  Crowley  Jan. ,'56 

Walter  Abel-Perry  Lopez  Mar.  3 1, '56 

James  Stewart-June  Allyson  July, '55 

James  Stewart-June  Allyson  Feb. ,'56 

Cornel  Wilde-Jean  Wallace  Jan. ,'56 

Bill  Elliott-Beverly  Garland  Dec.  1 8, '55 

Katharine  Hepburn-Rossano  Brazzi  June, '55 

Hildegarde  Neff-Derek  Bond  Sept.  9, '55 


Randolph  Scott-Dorothy  Malone  June  18, 

Clark  Gable-Jane  Russell  Oct., 

John  Agar-Mara  Corday  Dec., 

Richard  Conte-Peggie  Castle  Dec.  10, 

Margaret  Leighton-John  Justin  Aug., 

Tommy  Cook-Mollie  McCart  Nov., 

Frank  Sinatra-Debbie  Reynolds  Nov.  4, 

John  Payne-Ronald  Reagan  Sept.  27 

Claudette  Colbert-Barry  Sullivan  Nov.  30, 

Olivia  de  Havilland-Gilbert  Roland  June, 

Barbara  Stanwyck-Fred  MacMurray  Feb., 

Joan  Crawford-Meivyn  Douglas  (reissue)  June, 
S.  Tracy-Van  Johnson  (reissue)  Nov., 

Jeff  Morrow-Faith  Domergue  June, 

Edward  Constantine-Colette  Dereal  July, 

Arturo  daCordova  Dec,, 

Marla  English  Jan., 

Gene  Kelly-Lana  Turner  (reissue)  Feb., 

Aldo  Ray-Phil  Carey  Nov., 

Linda  Christian-Carlos  Thompson  Mar.  4, 

Gene  Nelson-Faith  Domergue  Oct.  9, 

Cary  Grant-Grace  Kelly  Sept., 

Audie  Murphy-Marshall  Thompson  Oct. 

Sophia  Loren-Vittorio  De  Sica  Jan., 

Sterling  Hayden-William  Bishop  Dec., 

Dane  Clark-Lita  Milan  Nov.  6, 

Kent  Taylor-Petula  Clark  Jan., 

Fred  MacMurray-Henry  Fonda  (reissue)  Oct., 
Rory  Calhoun-Shelley  Winters  Oct.  19, 

Glenn  Ford-Dorothy  McGuire  Oct.  7. 

James  Cagney  Apr.  13, 

Edmund  Gwenn-John  Forsythe  Jan., 

Mickey  Rooney-Coleen  Gray  Oct.  13, 


'55 

'55 

■55 

■55 

'55 

■55 

■55 

'55 

55 

■55 

■56 

■55 

■55 

55 

■55 

■55 

■56 

'56 

■55 

■56 

■55 

'55 

55 

'56 

'55 

'55 

■56 

'55 

■55 

*55 

■56 

■56 

55 


Kirk  Douglas-Silvana  Mangano  Oct.,'55 

Carlo  Battisti-Maria  Pia  Casilio  Nov.  7,^55 

Paulette  Goddard-Gary  Cooper  [reissue)  Oct.,^55 


Scott  Brady-Audrey  Totter 


Nov.l7.'55 


Richard  Egan-Dana  Wynter  Nov.,^55 

Bette  Davis-Richard  Todd  Aug.,^55 


African  Adventure 
Louis  Hayward-Dennis  O^Keefe 
Errol  Flynn-Joanne  Dru 
Humphrey  Bogart-Joan  Bennett 
Raymond  Greenleaf-Marjie  Mill 
Crosby- Kay  e-Clooney 
Joel  McCrea-Vera  Miles 
Nigel  Patrick-Moira  Lister 
Seoroe  Cole-Veronica  Hurst 
Bill  Williams-Georgla  Lee 
iijdv  Garland-Ray  Bolqer  ( 
Hugh  Marlowe-Nancy  Gates 


June  29, ^55 
(reissue)  Dec.,^55 
Sept.  1 1,^55 
Auq.,^55 
ar  Feb. ,'56 

(reissue)  Oct.. '55 
July  3, '55 
Mar.  I8,'56 
Sept.  27, '55 
Feb.,'56 
reissue)  July  6. '55 
Mar.  25, '56 


Jane  Wyman-Gregory  Peck 


(reissue)  Mar.,'56 


Dean  Martin-Jerry  Lewis 


Aug.,'65 


Running  -REVIEWED 


Time 

Issue 

Page 

86m 

86m 

Dec.  3 

689 

1 14m 
1 06m 

Apr.  2 

385 

87m 

Dec.  17 

706 

65m 

Dec.  24 

714 

99m 

June  18 

482 

82m 

Oct.  1 

609 

83m 

May 

14 

434 

I2lm 

Oct. 

1 

61 1 

80m 

Nov. 

19 

674 

92m 

Nov. 

19 

673 

90m 

Aug. 

27 

570 

77m 

Oct. 

15 

634 

1 1 Im 

Oct. 

29 

649 

87m 

Oct. 

1 

50P 

86m 

Dee. 

10 

698 

lOOm 

May 

28 

458 

84m 

«7m 

138m 

87m 

Apr. 

2 

385 

81m 

Oct. 

15 

635 

80m 

Jan. 

7 

730 

73m 

Jan. 

14 

738 

1 26m 

93m 

Oct. 

22 

641 

8 1 m 

71m 

97m 

July 

16 

513 

1 06m 

July 

23 

521 

73m 

Dec. 

17 

707 

72m 

Nov. 

19 

674 

96m 

Oct. 

1 

609 

105m 

Aug. 

6 

545 

99m 

Oct. 

8 

625 

73m 

Oct. 

15 

634 

1 04m 

June 

25 

490 

89m 

Nov. 

19 

673 

147m 


90m 

Nov. 

26 

681 

97m 

Oct. 

29 

649 

92m 

July 

30 

537 

65m 

91m 

July  2 

498 

85m 

Sept.  17 

594 

1 03  m 
70m 

June  18 

481 

120m 

Sept.  4, '54 

130 

Rim 

75m 

June  25 

489 

R4m 

Oct.  1 

610 

80m 
1 05m 
80m 

Jan.  14 

737 

1 28m 

102  m June  18  481 


L.  ot  D,  Herald 

Special 

Rating  Review 

Data 

A-2 

Very  Good 

A-l 

Excellent 

VV 

A-2 

Good 

A-2 

Good 

B 

Good 

A-2 

Excellent 

A-2 

Good 

B 

Excellent 

A-l 

Good 

A-l 

Good 

Good 

B 

Good 

B 

Excellent 

c 

Good 

A-l 

Good 

A-2 

Fair 

A-l 

Very  Good 

B 

Good 

Good 

B 

Fair 

A-l 

Very  Good 

A-2 

Excellent 

w 

A-2 

Very  Good 

A-l 

Fair 

A-l 

Fair 

A-2 

Good 

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B 

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w 

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B 

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A- 1 Good 

B Very  Good  Cs,  St,  Ms,  Os 
A- 1 Excellent  Cs-St,  Ms,  Os 


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W 

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W 

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FEATURES  LISTED  BY  COMPAISIES  - PAGE  745,  ISSUE  OF  JANUARY  14,  1956 
SHORT  SUBJECTS  CHART  APPEARS  ON  PAGES  722-723,  ISSUE  OF  DECEMBER  31,  1955 


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hant’s  eye! 

FIRST  12  WEEKS 

«573,493 

RIVOLI,  New  York  City 

FIRST  7 WEEKS 

‘224,315 

EGYPTIAN,  Los  Angeles 


$ 


FIRST  WEEK 

49,54S 

McVICKERS,  Chicago 


I,  what  beautiful  business! 
RODGERS  & HAMMERSTEIN’S 

khAcmutI 


PRESENTED  IN 


TODD-AO 

A Two-a-Day-Reserved-Seat  Road  Show! 

Distributed  by  MAGNA  THEATRE  CORP. 

233  W.  49fh  Sf.  (Phone  JUdson  6-0500)  New  York  19,  N.Y. 


You  can  cut-out  the  guess  work.  Washing- 
ton’s made  it  official.  Read  the  U.  S.  Com- 
merce Dept,  release  and  you’ll  see  Secretary 
Weeks  says  $1.3  billion  for  motion  pictures 
in  1956! 

A share  of  that  big  profit-packed  pie  is  yours. 
The  size  of  your  slice  will  be  as  big  as  ypur 
showmanship  can  make  it! 


Your  N.S.S.  office  can  give  you  a lot  of  help 
. . . so  call  ’em,  today! 


nnrionni 


SERVICE 

Of  THf  mOUSTRY 


iRROW^OIG' that  uranium 


STAMPEDE  OF  100 

NEVER  SUCH  SCENES!  WILL  LIFT  THE  FOLKS  OUT  OF  THEIR  SEATS! 

1 


When  this  thundering  herd  comes  stampeding  at  your 
audience  and  your  theatre  trembles  with  the  terror  of  frantic, 
pounding  hoofs;  when  Robert  Taylor,  as  the  kill-crazy 
hunter,  and  Stewart  Granger,  who  foresees  the  extermination 
of  the  buffalo,  come  to  grips  over  a beautiful  Indian  girl; 
when  the  thrills  of  "THE  LAST  HUNT”  and  the  majesty  of 
its  backgrounds  in  CinemaScope  and  Color  unfold  on  your 
screen,  you’ll  know  you  have  one  of  the  year’s  BIGGEST! 


WILD  BUFFALO 


IT’S  GREAT!  M-G-M's  "THE  LAST  HUNT”  FILMED  IN  DAKOTA  BAD  LANDS! 


HUNT” 

Starring 

ROBERT  TAYLOR 
STEWART  GRANGER 

LLOYD  , DEBRA  RUSS 
NOLAN  ‘ PAGET  ' TAMBLYN 


Screen  Play  by  RICHARD  BROOKS 
Bated  On  the  Novel  by  MILTON  LOTT  • Photographed  in  EASTMAN  COLOR 
Directed  by  RICHARD  BROOKS  • Produced  by  DORE  SCHARY 

★ 

(Available  in  Magnetic  Stereophonic,  Perspecta  Stereophonic  or  1-Channel  Sound) 


M-G-M  WEEK  FEB.  5-11  • “An  M-G-M  Picture  On  Every  Screen  of  the  World” 


THE  EXCITEMENT  BEGINS  AT  THE  WARNER  BROS'.  TRA 


ALBANY 

20th  Century-Foi  kreening  Soom 
IOS2  8»or.  • 8 OOP  If 
ATLANTA 

20th  Ccntury  Foi  kreenmg  8o«m 
197WolliinSl  NW  ‘ 2 00  PM 
BOSTON 

20th  Ctfitury-Fox  kreexing  loom 
nSBooy.  - 2 00  PM 


BUFFALO 

Motion  Pitt  Operator!  Boll 
498  Pearl  St.  ‘ 8 00  PM 
CHARLOTTE 

20th  (entufy  Foi  Screening  Roam 
308  S.  Church  St  ‘ 2 00  PM 
CHICAGO 
Worner  Screening  Room 
1307  SO.  Wobothlve.  - I 30  P M 


CINCINNATI 

RKO  Polote  Th.  Screening  Room 

12E.6lhSt.  ‘ 8 00  P M. 

CLEVELAND 

20th  Cenlucy  Fox  Screening  Room 
2219  Poyne  Axe.  ‘ 2 00  P.M. 
DALLAS 

20th  Century-Fox  Screening  Room 
1803  Wood  St.  ‘ 2:00  P.M. 


DENVER 

Paramount  Screening  Room 
2100  Stout  St.  ‘ 2:00  P.M. 

DES  MOINES 
20lh  Cenlury-Fox  Screening  Room 
1300  High  St.  ‘ 12  4SP.M 
DETROIT 

20lh  Centucy-Fox  Screening  Room 
2211  CoiiAye.  ‘ 2 00  P.M. 


INDIANAPOLIS 

20th  Century-fox  Screening  Room 

326  110.  IllinoiiSt.  ‘ I 00  P.M. 

JACKSONVILLE 

Florrdo  Theotre  Bldg.  Sc.  Rm. 

128  E.  Forsyth  St.  ‘ 2 00  P.M. 
KANSAS  CITY 
20th  Century-Fox  Screening  Room 
l720  WyondotteSl-  ‘ 10:30  A.M. 


LOS  ANGELES 

Warner  Screening  Room 

2025  So.  Vermont  Ave.  ‘ 2 00  P.M. 

MEMPHIS 

20lh  Century-Fox  Screening  Room 
151  Vance  Ave.  ‘ 3 00  P.M. 
MILWAUKEE 
Worner  Theatre  Screening  Room 
21 2 W.  Wisconsin  Ave.  ‘ 8:00  P.M. 


MINNEAPOLIS 
Worner  Screening  Room 
lOOOCurcieAve.  ‘ 2 00  P M. 
NEW  HAVEN 
Stanley  Worner  Screening  Room 
70  College  St.  - 1:30  P.M 
NEW  ORLEANS 
20th  Century-Fox  Screening  Room 
200  Liberty  St.  ‘ 2:00  P.M. 


NEW  YORK 
Home  Office 

321  W.  44lhSt.  ‘ 2:15  P.M. 
OKLAHOMA 

20lh  Centuty-Fox  Screening  Room 
10  North  lee  St.  - 10  00  A.M. 
OMAHA 

20th  Century-Fox  Screening  loom 
1 502  Davenport  St.  ‘ 1:30  P.M. 


PEGGIE  CASTLE  • 
GEORGE  GIVOT  • 


FRED  CLARK- EILEEN  HECKART- JOSEPHINE 


BARBARA  NICHOLS  - HALLIWELL  HOBBES  • PAUL  PiCERNi 
ALAN  KING  - IRENE  SEIONER  -ARTE  JOHNSON 


HUTCHINSON : WILLIAM 


84U«IC  COMPO«CO  AMD  CONDUCTIO 


* PRODUCED  av  FRANK 


NOVEL  AND  SCREEN  PLAY  BY  BEN  HECHT 


GARGAN  • MARCEL  DALIO 

P.  ROSENBERG  * OIRECTCO  9V  RUDOLPH  MATt 


A LONELY  GIRL, 
A SOLDIER 
AND  THEIR 
STREET-CORNER 
PICK-UP  DATE!  — 
THIS  IS  THE  WAY 
IT  BEGINS  — 
TO  CHANGE 
A GIRL’S  LIFE  — 
AND  BRING 
TO  THE  SCREEN 
A NEW 
EXCITEMENT, 
A VERY 
RARE  GLOW! 


PHILADELPHIA 
Warner  Screening  Room 
230No.  nitiSl.  • 2:00  P M. 
PITTSBURGH 

20lh  Century-Fox  Screening  Room 

ITISBIvd.  of  Allies  ■ 1:30P.M. 

PORTLAND 

Star  Screening  Room 

925  N.W.  19lhAve.  • 2 00  P.M. 


SALT  LAKE  CITY 

20lh  Century  Fox  Screening  Room 

316  East  Isl  South  • I 00  P M 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

Republir-Scteening  Room 

221  Golden  Cote  Ave.  ■ I 30  P.M. 

SEAnCE 

Venetian  Theatre 

ISthAve.SE.PineSt.  • 2:00  P.M. 


ST.  LOUIS 
S'renco  Screening  Room 
31430liveSt.  • 100P.M. 
WASHINGTON 
Stonley  Warner  Screening  Room 
l3lh&E.Sts.N.W.  • 10  30  A M. 


Give 

ve 

SDecia 


— 

BC 

Ud 

j. 

M . 

If 


NEXT 

WEEK 


DEMONSTRATES 
IN  THE 

FOLLOWING  CITIES: 


JAN.  30 


ATLANTA 

FOX 


MISSOULA 

FOX 


PITTSBURGH 

FULTON 


JAN.  31 


JACKSONVILLE 

FLORIDA 


SALT  LAKE  CITY 

VILLA 


BUFFALO 

CENTER 


MIAMI 

CARIB 


DENVER 

CENTER 


TORONTO 

IMPERIAL 


FEB.  2 


NEW  ORLEANS 

SAENGER 


OMAHA 

ORPHEUM 


ROCHESTER 

PALACE 


MEMPHIS 

MALCO 


DES  MOINES 
DES  MOINES 


FEB.  3 


SYRACUSE 

PARAMOUNT 


TO  ATTEND 
THE  SHOWING 
NEAREST  YOU  I 


All  showings  start 
promptly  at  9:45  a.m. 


Projection  in  35mm  Prints  • No  Changes  Required  in  the  Booth  of  Theatres  Equipped  for  Stereophonic  Sound 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD 


MARTIN  QUIGLEY,  Editor-in-Chief  and  Publisher 


Vol.  702,  No.  3 


MARTIN  QUIGLEY,  JR.,  Editor 


January  21,  1956 


Admissions  on  Credit 

Motion  picture  exhibition  always  has  prided  it- 
self for  being  a strictly  cash  business.  Cash  at 
the  box  office  certainly  has  advantages.  On  the 
other  hand  the  American  public  has  shown  a growing 
propensity  for  buying  almost  everything  on  credit  and 
paying  later. 

In  what  some  consider  “the  good  old  days”  credit  was 
extended  principally  for  durable  goods  and  property. 
The  main  tests  were  ability  to  repay  and  sound  eco- 
nomic need.  In  the  modern  era  everyone  employed 
seems  to  be  assumed  to  have  the  ability  to  repay  vir- 
tually unlimited  credit.  Also  the  need  for  the  credit  is 
extended  in  all  directions.  Even  conservative  banks  now 
are  urging  credit  for  holiday  trips,  pleasure  boats  and 
almost  any  other  luxury  or  whim. 

While  many  people  have  a traditional  aversion  to  un- 
restricted credit,  there  are  some  economists  who  not 
only  consider  it  acceptable  but  even  positively  desir- 
able. Whatever  the  result,  the  fact  is  a large  part  of 
the  business  of  the  country  is  done  on  credit.  If  auto- 
mobile dealers  and  mail  order  firms,  to  cite  only  two 
examples,  should  adopt  the  cash-only  policy  of  the  the- 
atres, their  gross  volume  probably  would  be  cut  in  half. 

No  one  knows  whether  motion  picture  theatres  would 
benefit  by  extending  credit  to  patrons.  So  far  as  the 
records  show  no  extensive  tests  have  ever  been  made. 
In  each  area  the  mechanics  of  extending  the  credit 
would  have  to  be  worked  out  carefully.  Certainly  it 
would  involve  additional  costs  to  the  exhibitor  for  book- 
keeping. It  also  would  involve  some  losses.  Although 
if  the  record  of  other  business  is  any  guide,  the  amount 
of  the  loss  would  be  small.  Furthermore,  theatres  could 
stand  a certain  small  percentage  of  non-payers  better 
than  some  lines  of  activity  because  in  most  instances 
handling  additional  patrons  entails  little  or  no  additional 
overhead  or  operating  expense. 

A CREDIT  card  system  also  has  certain  intangible 
advantages.  If  every  man  carried  in  his  wallet 
and  every  woman  in  her  purse  a theatre  credit 
card,  there  would  be  a reminder — often  seen  during  the 
day — to  go  to  the  movies.  Then  to  be  considered  is  the 
convenience  of  “charging”  tickets  instead  of  paying  cash. 
Such  a service  might  also  stimulate  advance  ordering  of 
tickets,  theatre  parties  and  attendance  on  regular  nights 
at  the  movies. 

One  of  the  factors  that  may  be  handicapping  theatre 
attendance  is  the  fact  that  more  and  more  transactions 
of  money  are  done  by  check  and  the  amount  of  cash  in 
the  hands  of  the  average  family  is  not  a large  sum.  By 
the  time  the  weekend  comes — which  is  the  best  movie- 
going time — many  families  are  just  out  of  cash. 


The  whole  subject  of  admissions  on  credit  is  one  of 
the  matters  that  the  industry  is  uncertain  about  because 
there  has  been  no  adequate  research  and  local  testing. 
If  attendance  can  be  boosted  twenty  per  cent — or  even 
ten  per  cent — by  billing  monthly  patrons  who  wish  such 
a service,  it  certainly  would  be  worthwhile. 

The  only  way  to  find  out  how  much  a credit  card  for 
movies  would  cost  and  what  effect  it  would  have  on 
attendance,  is  to  try  one  out.  For  many  reasons  initially 
at  least  such  a system  should  be  organized  on  a local 
area  basis.  The  exhibitor,  or  all  the  exhibitors  in  a com- 
munity working  together,  could  have  a single  credit  card. 
Circuits  with  a number  of  theatres  in  town  are  in  a 
specially  good  position  to  test  credit  cards.  In  some 
situations  existing  credit  plans  organized  by  local  mer- 
chants, department  stores  or  gasoline  stations,  might  be 
used. 

Let  us  find  out  what  role  credit  can  play  in  building 
theatre  attendance  and  grosses.  In  these  times  no  pos- 
sible avenue  of  improving  business  should  be  over- 
looked. The  HERALD  will  welcome  comments  and  re- 
ports of  tests  of  ticket  credit  plans  for  the  mutual  benefit 
of  all  exhibitors. 


It  must  be  recognized  that  the  ideal  exhibitor — as 
the  ideal  person — is  not  often  encountered.  There  is  prob- 
ably no  business  in  which  it  is  as  important  for  the  owner 
to  become  identified  with  the  community  he  serves.  Yet 
too  often  an  exhibitor  is  too  occupied  with  theatre  opera- 
tion to  become  civic  minded.  Hugh  W.  Bruen,  who  died 
recently,  is  a good  example  of  an  ideal  exhibitor.  The 
Whittier  News  in  Whittier,  Calif,  called  him  one  of  the 
town’s  best  loved  and  most  widely  known  citizens.  While 
he  was  active  in  many  community  organizations  and 
campaigns,  he  also  was  prominent  in  exhibition  organiza- 
tion activities.  Moreover  he  maintained  his  youthful 
confidence  and  enthusiasm  for  the  theatre.  A year  ago, 
in  his  40th  year  as  an  exhibitor,  Hugh  Bruen  opened  a 
new  drive-in  theatre  in  Whittier. 


C|  E.  K.  “Ted”  O’Shea  leaves  Paramount  with  the  best 
wishes  of  the  officers  and  other  associates  of  that  com- 
pany and  of  his  many  friends  throughout  the  industry 
for  success  in  his  new  post  in  charge  of  distribution  of 
Magna’s  “Oklahoma!”  With  a long  and  effective  career 
in  distribution  Mr.  O’Shea  is  well  qualified  to  pioneer 
in  the  distribution  of  the  Todd- AO  film  both  in  its  65mm 
roadshow  engagements  and  in  its  general  distribution 
in  35mm  CinemaScope. 


— Martin  Quigley,  Jr. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD 


Arnall  Defends  Johnston 


To  Martix  Quigley  : 

I have  taken  three  weeks  to  think  it  over, 
before  writing  you  about  your  recent  edi- 
torial on  Eric  Johnston  in  \Iotion  Picture 
Herald  December  24,  1955,  issue.  I took  my 
time  because  it  isn't  easy  to  write  a letter  to 
one  friend  complaining  about  a view  he  has 
taken  about  another  friend,  and  I have  been 
hoping  that  time  would  provide  the  insight 
and  the  delicacy  and  tact  necessary  for  the 
task.  Time  has  made  no  sucli  provision.  So 
I shall  have  to  do  the  best  I can,  clumsily 
instead  of  eloquently,  but  with  a realization 
that  whatever  is  worth  doing  is  worth  doing 
badly  if  you  can’t  do  it  well. 

.\s  you  know,  Eric  Johnston  and  I have 
frequently  failed  to  see  eye  to  eye  on  many 
vital  questions  confronting  the  motion  pic- 
ture industry.  Nevertheless,  as  you  do,  I 
esteem  him  highly  for  many  qualities  and  I 
estimate  greatly  his  value  to  the  industry 
upon  quite  another  basis  than  my  confessed 
personal  liking  for  him. 

Eric  Johnston  has  broad  interests ; he  has 
served  and  is  serving  ably  with  the  Govern- 
ment : he  is  engaged  in  policy-making  di- 
rection of  a number  of  large  industrial  and 
business  enterprises.  Those  efforts,  public 
and  private,  enable  him  to  maintain  a view- 
point toward  our  industry  that  has  the  value 
of  detachment.  It  enables  him  to  bring  into 
play  in  such  efforts  as  negotiations  and 
agreements  for  foreign  markets  for  Ameri- 
can films,  an  area  in  which  I have  had  close 
contact  with  him.  a very  imixjrtant  wealth 
of  general  information  and  a broad  acquaint- 
anceship with  conditions  in  many  other 
fields.  His  great  personal  prestige,  his  wide 
and  varied  experience,  his  numerous  and 
important  contacts  are  tremendously  helpful 
to  us. 

I do  not  think  that  Eric  Johnston’s  com- 
ment about  a mild  box  office  recession  in 
the  United  States  damaged  a single  pro- 
ducer, distributor  or  exhibitor.  The  facts  are 
too  widely  known  through  the  accurate  and 
forthright  columns  of  such  fine  industry  pub- 
lications as  The  HEIUA.LD.  Eric’s  statement 
that  the  export  field  is  of  increasing  im- 
portance was  a factual  statement,  however 
he  might  have  phrased  it;  as  the  United 
States  takes  a constantly  more  influential 
position  in  the  affairs  of  the  free  world,  its 
motion  picture  industry  will  take  a more  im- 
portant place  in  the  theatres  of  Asia,  Africa 
and  Australia. 

Finally,  I think  that  you  misconstrue  Eric 
Johnston’s  position  about  the  Production 
Code.  The  Society  of  which  I have  the  honor 
to  serve  as  president,  unfortunately,  has 
nothing  to  do  with  the  administration  of  the 
Code,  but  our  members  adhere  to  it  and  con- 
tribute to  its  financing.  The  Code  must  con- 


tinue to  exist.  Apart  from  its  ethical  basis 
and  social  value,  it  is  an  economic  necessity 
to  our  industry.  Nevertheless,  there  can  be 
errors,  and  sometimes  there  are  errors,  in 
the  interpretation  and  administration  of  the 
Code.  There  is  also  the  necessity,  as  in  life 
generally,  of  keeping  it  constantly  in  proper 
relationship  to  the  world  of  reality  of  which 
it  is  a part. 

When  Eric  Johnston  said,  “I  have  always 
felt  that  motion  pictures  should  show  any 
subject  with  good  taste”,  I do  not  think  that 
he  meant  that  the  basic  values  of  the  Pro- 
duction Code  should  be  relaxed ; on  the  con- 
trary, the  impression  his  words  conveyed  to 
me  was  that  he  thought  that  all  subjects 
should  be  treated  with  propriety  and  good 
taste  and  that  there  was  imposed  upon  pro- 
ducers, by  self  respect  rather  than  any  code, 
the  responsibility  of  treating  every  film, 
every  idea  of  an  author,  every  concept  of  a 
director,  with  sincerity  and  good  manners. 
It  is  true  that  the  words  do  not  always  con- 
vey precisely  the  same  meaning  to  everyone 
at  the  same  time,  but  they  have  a definite 
meaning  within  the  conscience  of  each  indi- 
vidual, and  I think  that  Eric  appealed  very 
simply  and  very  directly  to  that  conscience. 

Often  during  the  seven  years  that  I have 
been  privileged  to  be  associated  with  the 
motion  picture  industry,  I have  had  occasion 
to  estimate  Eric  Johnston’s  value  to  it.  I 
think  that  value  is  very  great.  I should  hate 
to  have  him  feel  that  he  should  choose  be- 
tw'een  .sacrificing  his  other  activities  from 
which  the  entire  industry  so  greatly  benefits, 
or  leaving  his  post  with  the  industry.  Really, 
I don’t  think  you  want  him  to  do  either. 
— ELLIS  ARNALL,  President,  Society  oj 
Independent  Motion  Picture  Producers. 


[EDITOR'S  NOTE:  The  HERALD  is 
pleased  to  receive  and  to  publish  Governor 
.Urnall’s  letter  in  tribute  to  Eric  Johnston’s 
many  personal  qualities  and  to  his  services 
of  high  order  on  a broad  front  to  the  motion 
picture  industry.  The  HERALD  editorial 
raised  no  question  on  either  point. 

The  HERALD  editorial  did,  however,  in 
measured  terms  of  fair  comment  question 
the  propriety  of  Mr.  Johnston’s  billboarding 
in  direful  terms  to  the  general  public  the 
Autumn  slump  at  the  box  office.  Press  at- 
tentions which  came  in  eonsequence,  with 
the  inevitable  discouragement  to  ticket-buy- 
ers, leave  no  doubt  that  the  remarks  served 
no  useful  purpose. 

There  never  has  been  any  reason  in  this 
quarter  to  doubt  Mr.  Johnston’s  position  in 
support  of  the  Production  Code.  But  it  is 
our  impression  the  remarks  in  the  Holly- 
wood press  interview  representing  that 
“good  taste”  is  the  qualifying  factor  for 


January  21,  1956 

Page 


GOLDENSON  keys  drive  to  space 
top  releases;  has  10-point  program  12 

JERRY  WALD  SAYS:  Why  the  tears? 

Let's  get  cracking  1 7 

SECOND  FILMS  British  target;  gov- 
ernment aid  cutback  20 

BOX-OFFICE  CHAMPIONS  listed 
for  December,  1955  22 

LOEWS  reports  nets  for  year  at 
$5,311,733  22 

REPUBLIC  begins  drive  saluting  Dick 
Altschuler  24 

RKO  BUDGETS  $22,500,000  for  I I 
films  25 

FIRST  ROUND  begins  in  tax  fight  in 
Washington  35 

SERVICE  DEPARTMENTS 

Refreshment  Merchandising  42 

Film  Buyers'  Rating  3rd  Cover 

Hollywood  Scene  25 

Managers'  Round  Table  39 

The  Winners'  Circle  36 

National  Spotlight  28 

IN  PRODUCT  DIGEST  SECTION 

Showmen's  Reviews  753 

Short  Subjects  754 

The  Release  Chart  756 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  Martin  Quigley,  Editer-in- 
Chief  and  Publisher;  Martin  Quigley,  Jr,,  Editor;  Raymond 
Levy,  Executive  Publisher;  James  D.  Ivers,  News  Editor; 
Charles  S.  Aaronson,  Production  Editor;  Floyd  E.  Stone, 
Photo  Editor;  Ray  Gallagher,  Advertisirtg  Manager;  Gus 
H.  Fausel,  Production  Manager.  Bureaus:  Hollywood, 

Samuel  D.  Berns,  Manager:  William  R.  Weaver,  Editor. 
Yucca-Vine  Building,  Telephone  HOllywood  7-2145; 
Chicago,  120  So.  LaSalle  St.,  Urben  Farley,  Advertising 
Representative,  Telephone  Financial  6-3074;  Washington, 
J.  A.  Otten,  National  Press  Club;  London,  Hope  Williams 
Burnup,  Manager;  Peter  Burnup,  Editor;  William^  Poyi 
News  Editor,  4 Golden  Square.  Correspondents  in  the 
principal  capitals  of  the  world.  Member  Audit  Bureau  of 
Circulations.  Motion  Picture  Herald  is  published  every 
Saturday  by  Quigley  Publishing  Company.  Inc.,  Rocke- 
feller Center,  New  York  City  20.  Telephone  Circle  7-3100; 
Cable  address;  “Quigpubco,  New  York",  Martin  Quigley, 
President-*  Martin  Quigley,  Jr.,  Vice-President;  Fheo.  J. 
Sullivan,  Vice-President  and  Treasurer;  Raymond  Levy, 
Vice-President,  Leo  J.  Brady,  Secretary.  Other  Quigley 
Publications:  Better  Theatres  and  Better  Refreshment  Mer- 
chandising, each  published  thirteen  times  a year  as^  a 
section  of  Motion  Picture  Herald;  Motion  Picture  Daily, 
Television  Today,  Motion  Picture  Almanac,  Television 
Almanac.  Fame. 


screen  acceptability  is  predicated  on  a mis- 
understanding— a misunderstanding  which 
Governor  Arnall  seems  also  to  share. 

Governor  Arnall  is  to  be  complimented 
for  his  warm-hearted  expression  relative  to 
his  fellow  association  president,  voicing  a 
spirit  too  seldom  expressed  in  this  industry. 
It  is  additionally  welcome,  coming  as  it  does 
from  one  who  is  seldom  heard  from  or  seen 
in  the  day-by-day  affairs  of  the  indusiry. 

—M.O.] 


8 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  21.  1956 


WHEN  AND  WHERE 


(^n  the 


opizon 


ETHICS 

Creative  talent  guilds  in  Hol- 
lywood, as  much  as  other  pro- 
fessional guilds  should  have 
their  own  code  of  ethics  and 
should  relate  it  to  the  indus- 
try's Production  Code,  pro- 
ducer-director John  Farrow 
urged  in  the  film  capital  this 
week.  He  disclosed  he  will  ask 
the  Screen  Directors  Guild  to 
formulate  a charter  of  princi- 
ples and  disciplines.  He  added 
it  appeared  to  him  many  pro- 
ducers, writers,  and  directors 
seem  to  leave  the  burden  of 
taste  responsibility  to  the 
companies,  and  in  many  in- 
stances seem  to  be  attempting 
to  outwit  the  Code. 

TIMELY 

Universal's  "Six  Bridges  to 
Cross",  exciting  enough  a year 
ago  (because  it  portrayed  the 
Brinks  holdup)  now  is  being  de- 
manded eagerly.  Universal  re- 
ports, because  the  FBI  has  the 
ball.  Within  an  hour  after  the 
Federal  beagles  announced 
they'd  cracked  the  case  and  its 
criminals,  wise  showmen  in  Bos- 
ton, Providence,  and  Lowell  had 
rebooked  the  picture. 

DRAFT  READY 

This  week's  arbitration  news: 
The  "draft"  on  which  for  years 
now  lawyers  have  been  working 
is  in  their  hands  still.  This 
week,  company  sales  managers 
discussed  whether  to  submit  it 
to  the  Department  of  Justice  or 
hold  it  awhile  for  "further  de- 
velopments" . 

DISCOURAGING 

Ward  P.  Riggins,  Jr.,  of  the 
Riggins  circuit  of  Jesup,  Ga. , 
feels  CBS  commentator  Edward 
R.  Murrow  did  not  only  Liberace 
an  injustice,  but  also  the 
thousands  of  small  exhibitors 
who  still  haven't  run  Liber- 
ace's  Warner  picture,  "Sin- 
cerely Yours".  And  last  week 
took  pen  in  hand  to  tell  him 
so.  Mr.  Riggins,  vice-presi- 
dent of  the  family  enterprise, 
said  to  Mr.  Murrow:  "Even  after 
Mr.  Liberace  spoke  in  defense 
of  'Sincerely  Yours'  you  per- 
sisted by  asking  if  he  blamed 


the  failure  of  the  movie  on  his 
brother  . . . through  the  thou- 
sands of  small  town,  neighbor- 
hood, and  subsequent  run  thea- 
tres, millions  who  have  not  yet 
seen  this  movie  are  certain  to 
have  their  enthusiasm  damp- 
ened, to  say  the  least". 

NEW  FACES 

George  Sidney  flatly  says  the 
public  wants  new  personal- 
ities. The  Screen  Directors 
Guild  president  predicts  The 
HERALD  exhibitors'  poll  re- 
turns a year  from  now  will  dis- 
close many  more  new  faces  among 
the  Top  Ten.  (The  1955  poll 
disclosed  nine  of  the  ten  were 
"old-timers:)  Mr.  Sidney  said 
this  result  merely  proved  the 
directors  had  fallen  down  in 
developing  new  talents. 

AUTHOR-CRITIC 

Fred  Feldkamp  Productions  let 
it  be  known  in  Hollywood  this 
week  it  will  make  "The  Silken 
Affair"  in  London,  and  others 
abroad  in  its  program  of  ten  the 
next  five  years.  Just  in  pass- 
ing, the  story  for  "The  Silken 
Affair"  is  by  John  McCarten, 
critical  film  critic  of  "The 
New  Yorker" . 

MORE  FOR  ^ 

The  regularity  of  these  oc- 
currences these  days  hardly 
excites.  Republic  late  last 
week  let  it  be  known  it  now  will 
offer  to  television  76  "top" 
features.  Previously,  it  had 
released  some  300  "lower"  pic- 
tures . 

6 ^ ^ ^ 

Two  statistics  from  Canada. 
Average  admission  1955  was  50 
cents  (in  1954,  47  cents)  ; and 
taxes  took  six  cents. 

TESTING 

Long  before  1956  has  run  its 
course  a decision  will  have 
been  had  in  the  case  of  the  TV 
story  bought  by  Hollywood  and 
filmed  for  theatrical  exhibi- 
tion at  an  admission  price.  At 
least  half  a dozen  representa- 
tive productions  in  this  cate- 


January  29:  Sixth  annual  Communion  Break- 
fast for  Catholics  of  the  motion  picture  In- 
dustry In  the  New  York  area,  Waldorf- 
Astoria  Hotel,  New  York  City. 

January  29-31:  Annual  convention  of  the 

Theatre  Owners  of  North  and  South  Caro- 
lina, Hotel  Charlotte,  Charlotte,  N.  C. 

January  30:  Regular  mId-wInter  meeting  of 

the  lATSE  general  executive  board,  Holly- 
wood-Roosevelt  Hotel,  Hollywood. 

February  2:  Commencement  of  hearings,  be- 
fore the  Senate  Small  Business  Subcommit- 
tee, on  trade  practice  complaints  of  motion 
picture  exhibitors,  Washington,  D.  C. 

February  5:  Fifth  annual  Communion  Break- 

fast for  Catholics  of  the  motion  picture  In- 
dustry In  the  Los  Angeles  area,  Hollywood 
Paladlum,  Hollywood. 

February  7-9:  Annual  convention  of  United 

Theatre  Owners  of  Oklahoma,  Skirvin  Hotel, 
Oklahoma  City. 

February  18-19:  Full  membership  meeting  of 

the  recently  organized  National  Association 
of  Film  Service  Organizations,  Hotel  Cleve- 
land, Cleveland. 

February  20:  Testimonial  dinner  to  M.  B. 

Horowitz,  veteran  Cleveland  exhibitor. 
Hotel  Hollenden,  Cleveland. 

February  20:  MId-wInter  board  of  directors 

meeting  of  Allied  States  Association,  Hotel 
Cleveland,  Cleveland. 

February  21-23:  1956  National  Drive-In  Con- 

vention, Hotel  Cleveland,  Cleveland. 

March  6-7:  Annual  convention  of  the  Kansas- 
Mlssourl  Theatre  Association,  President 
Hotel,  Kansas  City,  Mo. 


gory  shall  have  gone  into  ex- 
hibition by  mid-year.  That 
should  be  enough  to  prove  the 
case,  one  way  or  the  other. 
Much  can  depend  on  which  way 
things  go. 


WINDMILL 

Desi  Arnaz,  whom  you  all  know 
as  Lucille  Ball's  ever  loving 
spouse,  has  a project  which 
certainly  represents  expansion 
from  the  small  comedy  format. 
He  has  purchased  Lazslo  Vadny's 
adaptation  of  Cervantes'  "Don 
Quixote"  and  will  produce  it 
with  Mr.  Vadny  as  a 90  minute 
color  spectacular  film  for 
television  here  and  theatres 
abroad. 

Floyd  E.  Stone — Vincent 
Canby — William  R.  Weaver 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21,  1956 


9 


THEY  LIKE  THE  CHALLENGE  of  making  pictures  themselves,  and  which 
therefore  they  can  call  their  own.  Andre  Hakim,  producer,  lately  of  "The 
Man  Who  Never  Was"  which  20th-Fox  will  release,  and  his  writer  wife, 
Susan  Marie,  in  New  York  talking  to  trade  writers  before  returning  to 
Paris  and  London.  Mr.  Hakim’s  observations  went  something  like  this: 
"Studios  here  give  fantastic  service,  but  in  Europe  you  do  everything. 
You  are  a promoter,  not  a producer.  Your  job  Is  to  put  a package  together. 
At  a studio  you  have  to  be  artistic,  not  a financial  wizard.  In  Europe, 
the  producer  gives  his  director  nine-tenths  of  artistic  problems.  However, 
with  all  its  headaches  I like  it.  The  people  I work  with  stay  on.  And  I can 
say  the  picture  is  mine."  He  worked  four  years  for  Darryl  Zanuck  and  says 
this  allowed  him  to  learn  what  makes  a picture.  He  says  these  days  the 
most  difficult  thing  is  casting.  "You  cannot  just  say  you  have  the  story. 
Unless  you  have  the  story  they  like,  they  are  not  interested."  For  his  next 
two  features,  he  Is  looking  for  American  stars.  "There  are  very  few  British 
stars,  and  they  will  get  you  nowhere." 


by  the  Herald 


INSPECTION  TOUR  for  the  chief.  The  welcome  mat  was  out  for  Jack 
L.  Warner  the  other  day  as  he  stopped  by  the  Leland  Hayward  set 
for  "The  Spirit  of  St.  Louis."  The  Warner  Brothers  executive  producer 
was  greeted  by  producer  Leland  Hayward  and  director  Billy  Wilder, 
at  the  left;  and  by  Jimmy  Stewart,  right,  who  plays  and  somehow  seems 
to  talk  and  look  like  Charles  A.  Lindbergh. 


Dk 


Id  wee 


L 


in 


F- 


ictu 


red 


PLANNING  THE  BIG  SHOW,  which 
this  time  will  be  truly  international: 
the  annual  conventions  (Trade  Show, 
Fair,  and  Exposition)  of  the  Theatre 
Owners  of  America  and  the  Theatre 
Equipment  and  Supply  Manufacturers 
in  September  at  the  New  York  Colos- 
seum. These  men  are  directors  of 
both  organizations  and  met  in  New 
York  one  afternoon  last  week.  Seated 
and  in  order  are  Larry  Davee  and 
M.  H.  Stevens,  TESMA;  Herman  Levy 
and  Walter  Reade,  TOA;  William  A. 
Gedris,  TESMA,  and  Lee  Jones,  its 
president:  Myron  Blank,  TOA  presi- 
dent; Merlin  Lewis,  TESMA;  and 
Horace  Denning,  Robert  Livingston, 
and  Joseph  Alterman,  TOA.  Stand- 
ing, Carl  Anderson,  Albert  Pickus, 
Pat  McGee,  Julian  Brylawski,  George 
Gaughan,  Ernest  Stellings,  and  George 
Kerasotes,  TOA;  and  Tom  La  Vezzi, 
V.  J.  Nolan,  and  Joe  Featherston, 
TESMA. 


IT'S  THE  "GLORY"  OPENING  which  RKO  held  at  the  Kentucky 
Theatre,  Lexington.  In  proper  array  with  proper  lobby  mike  are 
Mrs.  O’Brien,  star  Margaret  O'Brien,  announcer  Maggie  Welch, 
theatre  manager  Bob  Cox,  producer-director  David  Butler,  and 
Calumet  Farms  host  Paul  Ebelhardt. 


PROMOTION.  In  Indianapolis,  Bob  Conn,  left,  whom  20th-Fox 
transferred  to  Chicago  managership,  watches  as  Ray  Schmeri, 
of  Cleveland,  at  his  left,  is  congratulated  by  eastern  sales  man- 
ager Glenn  Norris.  Watchers  are  central  division  manager  Tom 
McCleaster  and  Carl  Mos,  right. 


IN  NEW  YORK,  20th-Fox  vice-president  Charles  Einfeld,  seated, 
signs  with  Arthur  Hull  Hayes,  CBS  Radio  president,  for  full  radio 
program  sponsorship  to  sell  55mm  CinemaScoped  "Carousel." 
See  page  36. 


DENOTING  arrival  of  MGM's  "I'll  Cry  Tomorrow"  at  the  Radio 
City  Music  Hall,  New  York:  the  reception  at  which  Russell  Down- 
ing, president,  was  host.  His  guests  are  author  Lillian  Roth  and 
star  Susan  Hayward  (Miss  Roth  in  the  picture). 


THEIR  FIRST  MEETING  OF  THE  YEAR.  The  men  and  women  who  head  the  strong  Ohio 
exhibitors'  organization,  the  Independent  Theatre  Owners  of  Ohio  (and  of  Allied)  are 
seen  around  the  luncheon  table  in  Columbus.  In  clockwise  order  are  Hoy  Russell, 
Edward  Ramsey,  Charles  Sugarman,  Marshall  Fine,  Henry  Greenberger,  Louis  Wiethe, 
office  secretary  Mrs.  Erva  Swysgood,  executive  secretary  Robert  Wile,  president  Horace 
Adams,  past  president  C.  F.  Pflster,  Blair  Russell,  F.  W.  Huss,  Jr.,  Park  Belden,  L.  F. 
Eick,  C.  S.  Velas,  and  J.  Real  Neth. 


THE  PICTURES  HERE,  at  the  right, 
represent  tradition,  and  progression. 
J.  Robert  "Bob"  Hoff  is  the  top  man 
now,  at  the  Ballantyne  Company, 
Omaha,  which  makes  theatre  equip- 
ment. He  steps  from  vice-presidency 
and  sales  managership  to  presidency. 
R.  S.  Ballantyne,  right,  below,  moves 
up  from  presidency  to  board  chair- 
manship. He  told  dealers  this  week 
that  at  66  plus  he  feels  healthy,  and 
this  therefore  should  be  the  time 
when,  smoothly  and  confidently,  he 
can  after  25  years  give  over  the  reins 
of  leadership  to  his  son-in-law.  And 
go  vacationing. 


NORMAN  GORDON  has  been 
"promoted  through  the  ranks"  of 
William  Goldman  Theatres,  Phila- 
delphia, so  that  this  week  he  be- 
came assistant  to  general  manager 
E.  Lyle  Trenchard.  He  first  was  an 
usher,  in  1946,  at  the  Terminal 
there,  and  lately  has  been  man- 
ager of  the  "flagship"  Randolph. 


AND  IT’S  "ANYTHING  GOES"  at  the  Boston 
preview,  one  of  32  Paramount  held  in  key  cen- 
ters. Gasper  Urban,  branch  manager,  center, 
welcomes  trade  friends.  They  are  Larry  Herman 
of  the  Snyder  circuit;  John  Glaier,  Western 
Massachusetts  Theatres;  Hy  Fine  and  Jerry 
Govan,  New  England  Theatres;  Phil  Berler,  E.  M. 
Loew  Theatres;  Ted  Fleischer,  Interstate;  Sam 
Seletsky,  Smith  circuit;  and,  kneeling,  Ben 
Williams,  Maine  Theatres. 


GOLDENSON  KEYS  DRIVE 
TO  SPACE  TOP  RELEASES 


. . . AB-PT  heads  win  pledges 
from  distributors  to  end  pres- 
ent '^feast  or  famine"  condi- 
tion; offer  10-point  program 


Optimistically  Angry 


In  a bold  and  original  move,  a large  cir- 
cuit which  has  long  been  plagued  by  the 
general  industry  complaint  of  “feast  or 
famine’’  in  the  matter  of  product,  has  ob- 
tained pledges  of  cooperation  from  11  pro- 
ducer-distributor companies  for  a program 
of  orderly  distribution  of  quality  product  in 
each  month  of  1956. 

The  circuit  is  American  Broadcasting- 
Paramount  Theatres,  and  the  pledges  and 
endorsements  were  received  by  Edward  L. 
Hyman,  vice-president,  who  recently  con- 
ducted a series  of  conferences  with  top  ex- 
ecutives. The  results  were  announced  at  a 
special  luncheon-press  conference  in  New 
York  last  week  by  Mr.  Hyman  and  Leonard 
H.  Goldenson.  AB-PT  president. 

^‘Orderly  Distribution^’ 

The  AB-PT  drive  for  an  “orderly  dis- 
tribution of  top  product’’  actually  is  just 
one  point  of  a 10-point  program  outlined 
by  the  circuit  chiefs  and  designed  “to  achieve 
the  greatest  potential  out  of  this  wonderful 
array  of  product  we  anticipate  in  1956.” 

Of  the  10  points,  the  subject  of  orderly 
distribution  received  the  major  share  of  at- 
tention. It  has  long  constituted  what  many 
exhibitors  have  called  “a  totally  unnecessary 
evil.”  In  May,  1954,  the  “evil”  was  given 
spectacular  attention  when  Walter  Reade, 
Jr.,  then  president  of  Theatre  Owners  of 
America,  and  Wilbur  Snaper,  board  member 
of  Allied  States  Association,  announced  a 
joint  TO  A- Allied  campaign  to  obtain  the 
kind  of  pledges  and  endorsements  which 
Mr.  Goldenson  and  Mr.  Hyman  announced 
last  week.  The  results  of  the  Reade-Snaper 
campaign  apparently  were  only  temporary. 

Mr.  Hyman  prefaced  his  announcement 
by  decrj-ing  the  “attacks  by  one  segment  of 
the  industry  upon  another”  and  the  fault 
finding  which  is  “rampant.”  “We,  for  one, 
realize,”  he  said,  “that  no  one  segment  of 
the  industry  is  to  blame  for  the  various  ills 
that  have  beset  us.  W’e  think  we  should 
all  share  the  blame  and  together  concentrate 
our  efiforts  on  curing  these  ills.” 

To  Guarantee  Time 

He  coupled  his  announcement  of  the 
pledges  with  the  promise  that  AB-PT  will 
guarantee  the  maximum  playing  time  and 
best  film  terms  to  quality  pictures  released 
during  what  he  called  the  “orphan  periods.” 
At  the  same  time  he  expressed  his  belief 
( Continued  on  page  16) 


Leonard  Goldenson,  left,  who  presided  at  the  luncheon,  and  Edward  L.  Hyman,  right,  who 
presented  details  of  the  plan. 


The  circuit  operator  was  mad — real  mad,  and  in  a let’s-do-something- 
ahout-it  mood. 

“This  industry,”  he  said  last  week  at  lunch  in  New  York,  “has  it  in  its 
power  to  make  this  year  the  most  prosperous  ever  in  its  history.  The 
one  reason  and  the  only  reason  why  we  have  done  this  (talked  to  the 
sales  managers  about  introducing  some  order  into  the  distribution  of 
<juality  pictures)  is  because  we  feel  that  somebody  ought  to  set  a fire 
under  the  film  industry.  Now  is  the  time  to  do  some  tub-thumping. 

“It  ought  to  get  off  its  collective  seat  and  do  something.  Forget  the 
machinery.  Nobody  needs  committees.  Just  sell  the  pictures.” 

He  based  his  prediction  about  “the  most  prosperous  year”  on  his  ap- 
praisal of  forthcoming  product  which  he  analyzes  as  increasing  slightly 
in  quantity  and  enormously  in  quality.  He  believes  there  has  never  be- 
fore been  such  an  array  of  top  quality  pictures;  that  although  the  indus- 
try has  been  going  through  some  drastic  and  rapid  evolution  in  the  past 
few  years,  it  has  the  vitality  and  strength  to  capitalize  now  on  this  array; 
and  that  the  pallbearers  and  calamity  howlers  couldn’t  be  more  wrong. 

This  young  and  dynamic  exhibitor  has  a reason  for  his  faith,  too. 
one  that  only  he,  uniquely,  could  have.  No  one  knows  better  than  he 
how'  the  other  half  lives.  And,  he  says: 

“We’ve  talked  to  psychologists,  sociologists,  statisticians  and  we  ve 
tested  it  ourselves.  People  are  still  going  out  for  their  entertainment  and 
they  always  will.” 

Television,  he  said  has  another  function.  But  when  the  housewife 
says,  “Let’s  do  something”  she  doesn’t  mean,  “Let’s  sit  in  the  living  room 
and  watch  television.” 

That  was  Mr.  Leonard  Goldenson,  president  of  American  Broadcasting- 
Paramount  Theatres,  Inc.,  talking. 


12 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21.  1956 


AN  IMPORTANT  MESSAGE 


from 

SPYROS  P.  SKOURAS 

President, 

20th  Century -Fox  Film  Corporation 


TO  THE  EXHIBITORS  WHO  WILL  ATTEND  THE  NA 

Qnema 


Alsi 


youR 


idNWIDE  DEMONSTRATIONS  OF 


I want  personally  to  extend  my  warmest  welcome  to  each  of  you  who  will  attend 
one  of  the  sixty  demonstrations  of  CinemaScope  55  between  January  19  and  February  21. 

Again  it  is  our  privilege  to  introduce  something  new  and  wonderful  in  the  develop- 
ment of  motion  pictures.  We  feel  that  the  advent  of  CinemaScope  55  marks  another  glorious 
moment  in  the  history  of  our  industry.  Not  since  we  launched  CinemaScope  itself  on  that 
historic  evening  of  September  16,  1953,  have  we  of  20th  Century-Fox  been  so  proud  of  a tech- 
nical achievement. 


It  is  the  final  fruition  of  the  dreams  of  men  who  make  and  love  motion  pictures. 
We  are  confident  the  public  will  reward  all  of  us  for  our  unceasing  efforts  to  bring  them  some- 
thing different,  something  better.  And  exhibitors  will  be  particularly  heartened  to  know  that 
CinemaScope  55  can  be  exhibited  in  regular  35mm  projection  in  theatres  equipped  for  stereo- 
phonic sound. 

W e of  20th  Century-Fox  appreciate,  too,  that  technical  research  and  advancement 
in  itself  is  not  enough.  Our  first  responsibility  is  the  production  of  the  highest  quality  motion 
pictures.  When  we  launched  CinemaScope  we  did  so  with  an  immortal  subject,  TME 
FtOBE.  Now  we  embark  on  CinemaScope  55  and  our  first  attraction  is  the  celebrated  and 
joyous  Rodgers  and  Hammerstein  masterwork,  CAFSOUSEL-,,  which  played  1,016  per- 
formances in  New  York  and  is  beloved  round  the  world. 


In  these  demonstrations  you  will  see  for  yourself  scenes  from  both  this  great 
musical  romance  CAROUSEL  and  our  second  important  production  in  CinemaScope 
55,  Rodgers  and  Hammerstein's  THE  KING  ANZ>  I,,  the  magnificent  musical  play 
which  ran  for  four  years  on  Broadway  and  on  tour. 

Mow,  just  29  months  after  the  beginning  of  CinemaScope  exhibition,  we  look  for- 
ward to  the  opening  of  CAROUSEL  in  CinemaScope  55  at  the  Roxy  Theatre,  New  York, 


the  night  of  February  16,  1956,  to  be  followed  immediately  by 
openings  throughout  the  United  States  and  in  all  the  capitals 
of  the  world. 


I want  to  express  my  eternal  obligation  to  the  army 
of  industrious  co-workers  at  our  studios  whose  technical  genius 
and  dedicated  research  brought  into  being  this  new  milestone  of 
progress.  And  I wish  to  reaffirm  my  gratitude  to  the  exhibitors 
of  America.. It  is  their  support  which  inspires  us  at  20th  Century- 
Fox*  to  strive  constantly  to  improve  conditions  in  our  industry. 


Believe  me,  it  is  an  industry  I am  proud  to  be  part 
of  and  to  serve,  just  as  I am  so  very  proud  to  be  a member  of  the 
organization  that  is  always  planning  ahead  and  moving  forward, 
to  an  ever  brighter  future  for  us  all. 


20th  Century -Fox  Film  Corporation 


Goldenson  Has  Ten-Part  Plan 
For  Stimulating  Box  Offices 


RELEASES 

(Continued  from  page  12) 

exhibition,  on  tlie  wiiole,  will  follow 
the  AB-PT  lead  in  order  to  end  the  recur- 
rin_<;  periods  of  "feast  or  famine'’  in  avail- 
able <iualit\-  product. 

Both  Mr.  Hyman  and  Mr.  Goldenson 
blamed  the  dip  at  the  box  office  following 
Labor  Dciv  last  year  and  the  lull  between 
Thank>giving  and  Christmas  on  the  lack 
of  ([uality  product  during  those  periods. 
"This  is  just  another  example  of  what  will 
continue  to  happen  until  we  realize  that  we 
are  in  business  every  day  of  the  year  and 
must  continue  at  all  times  to  give  our  pa- 
trons the  proper  inducements."  Mr.  Hyman 
said. 

The  "orphan  i)eriods"  listetl  by  him  in- 
clude the  months  of  May  and  June,  the  span 
from  Thanksgiving  to  Christmas,  and  a new 
period  which,  according  to  Mr.  Hyman, 
reared  its  “ugly  head”  for  the  first  time  dur- 
ing 1955 — the  period  immediately  after 
Labor  Day.  Scheduling  the  best  pictures 
for  the  four  major  holidays — Easter,  Fourth 
of  July,  Labor  Day  and  Christmas — is  anti- 
quated thinking,  he  indicated. 

^Ir.  Hyman  listed  the  May-June  period 
as  a time  for  high  business  potential  and 
pointed  out  that  in  that  period  the  big  T\’ 
shows  have  gone  off  the  air  for  the  summer. 
Regarding  December,  he  said  that  in  in- 
stance after  instance  a top  quality  picture 
released  for  Thanksgiving  can  play  right 
through  the  new  year,  eliminating  what 
ordinarily  would  he  a poor  business  month 
in  December. 

Report  on  Progress 

Mr.  Hyman  made  a compilation  of  prog- 
ress on  his  orderly  release  program,  report- 
ing that  in  some  cases  companies  altered 
their  release  schedules  following  conferences 
with  him.  He  expressed  the  hope  that  with 
the  round  of  endorsements  he  received,  com- 
panies, acting  individually,  will  fill  in  the 
“gaps”  with  top  quality  product  when  such 
product  is  not  available  in  a given  period. 
The  “gaps,”  he  said,  are  readily  apparent 
from  published  release  schedules,  which  are 
public  knowledge. 

The  following  is  a company  by  company 
report  on  his  conferences: 

Warner  Brothers.  The  company  has  set 
“The  .Spirit  of  St.  Louis”  with  James 
Stewart  for  release  June  2,  and  “The 
.Searchers”  or  “Giant”  for  September,  in 
addition  to  having  a roster  of  top  pictures 
from  which  to  select  their  Thanksgiving  re- 
lease. 

Paramount.  The  company,  which  has 
endorsed  the  AB-PT  plan,  has  specific  re- 
lease dates  only  through  Easter,  but  will 
'hortly  announce  films  for  the  .Summer  and 
I'all.  AB-PT  is  urging  the  company  to 
name  as  its  Thanksgiving  release  Alfred 
Hitchcock’s  “The  Man  Who  Knew  Too 
Much.”  which  stars  James  .Stewart.  This 
“would  make  for  goorl  release  pacing  since 
Warner  Brothers’  ‘Spirit  of  St.  I.ouis,’  with 
Jame>  .*^tewart  will  be  releaserl  June  2.” 


In  addition  to  the  proper  spacing  of 
releases  throughout  the  year,  nine  other 
operations  are  necessary  if  the  greatest 
potential  is  to  be  realized  from  the  strong 
array  of  product  anticipated  for  1956, 
Leonard  Goldenson,  American  Broadcast- 
ing-Paramount Theatres  president,  and  Ed- 
ward Hyman,  AB-PT  vice-president,  said 
last  Thursday  at  their  New  York  press  con- 
ference. 

The  nine  additional  phases  of  their  pro- 
gram for  correction  and  revitalization  of 
industry  operations  consist  of  the  following: 

The  equalization  of  advertising  rates  for 
television  and  tor  motion  picture  theatres 
in  mass  media,  with  checks  to  be  made  in 
various  sections  of  the  country  to  ascertain 
whether  or  not  TV  has  arty  advantage  over 
films  in  this  respect.  "While  it  is  important 
that  quality  pictures  be  released  every 
month  of  the  year,  it  is  just  as  important 
that  we  make  certain  our  advertising  is 
equally  effective  and  not  overshadowed  by 
TV." 

Proper  efforts  on  the  part  of  all  pro- 
ducers of  trailers  to  get  the  best  sales  and 
want-to-see  ingredients  incorporated  in 
trailers.  The  recent  improvement  in  trailers 
for  television  showing  should  also  be  ex- 
tended for  trailers  shown  in  theatres. 

Advancement  of  the  plan,  proposed  by 
Mr.  Goldenson  and  now  under  development 
by  a COMPO  committee  headed  by  Harry 
Mandel  of  RKO  Theatres,  tg  recapture  for 
theatres  the  women's  audience  through 
better  public  relations,  and,  through  the 
women,  to  recapture  the  family  patronage. 
"As  soon  as  complete  information  concern- 
ing this  plan  is  available,  it  will  receive  the 
widest  possible  circulation  and  all  segments 
of  the  industry  will  be  asked  to  cooperate." 

Special  efforts  should  be  made  to  attract 
youngstt."s  to  the  theatres,  not  only  be- 
cause some  25,000,000  of  them  will  ap- 


MGM.  The  company  has  endorsed  the 
orderly  release  plan,  as  well  as  the  nine  other 
points  of  the  AB-PT  program.  Charles 
Reagan,  Loew’s  vice-president  in  charge  of 
distribution,  has  promised  that  as  soon  as 
he  has  viewed  all  of  the  company’s  new 
product  he  will  be  able  to  announce  the 
schedule  for  the  .Summer  and  Fall  months. 
This  information  will  be  forthcoming  the 
first  week  of  February. 

20th-Fox.  All  the  executives  endorse 
the  idea  of  an  orderly  release  schedule  and 
anticipate,  through  such  a schedule,  greatly 
improved  box  office  grosses  to  justify  their 
$70,000,000  production  budget  for  1956.  It 
has  scheduled  “Bus  Stop”  and/or  “Anasta- 
sia” for  May  and  June  and  “The  Man  in 
the  Gray  Flannel  Suit”  for  the  pre-Easter 
.\farch  release. 


proach  teen  age  within  five  years  but  also 
because  they  are  the  motion  picture  thea- 
tres' patrons  of  tomorrow.  "We  also  intend 
to  urge  all  exhibitors  to  open  their  bag  of 
tricks  in  an  effort  to  make  their  theatres 
the  focal  point  of  amusement  in  their  com- 
munities." 

Production  should  develop  new  faces 
and  talent,  first  to  overcome  the  present 
shortage  of  box  office  names  which  creates 
casting  difficulties,  leaves  a few  big  names 
in  practical  control  of  production  and  re- 
sults in  the  simultaneous  releases  using  the 
same  star  or  stars,  and,  secondly,  to  better 
serve  the  younger  audience  with  person- 
alities attractive  to  them  and  likely  to 
strengthen  the  film-going  habit. 

Improvement  of  publicity  for  Hollywood 
and  motion  picture  theatres,  especially 
through  the  efforts  of  individual  exhibitor 
contacts  with  the  local  press,  to  insure  film 
publicity  being  accorded  at  least  as  good 
attention  in  the  press  as  that  accorded  to 
television. 

Continue  and  improve  the  COMPO 
Audience  Awards,  which  has  the  potential 
of  becoming  a very  valuable  asset  to  the 
industry.  "In  our  opinion  we  should  con- 
tinue the  Audience  Awards  each  year  and 
plan  for  continuously  improving  super- 
vision." 

Inaugurate  and  support  more  promo- 
tional endeavors  such  as  the  Spring  Movie 
Festival  and  Motion  Picture  Forum  to  be 
staged  by  National  Theatres  under  Elmer 
Rhoden's  direction.  They  can  render  "in- 
valuable assistance  to  the  quality  pictures 
made  available"  in  the  so-called  "orphan 
periods." 

Enlist  the  cooperation  of  all  producers, 
distributors  and  exhibitors  in  the  foregoing 
efforts  and  correct  the  deterioration  in 
showmanship  which  has  taken  place  in  the 
last  several  years. 


Columbia.  Abe  Montague,  vice-presi- 
dent in  charge  of  distribution,  “also  sub- 
scribed wholeheartedly  to  an  orderly  dis- 
tribution of  quality  product.”  Despite  tra- 
ditional bad  weather  conditions  which  hurt 
box  offices  in  February,  Columbia  will  re- 
lease “Picnic”  during  that  month.  To  fill 
another  “orphan  period,”  the  company  has 
switched  the  release  of  ‘‘The  Eddy  Duchin 
Story”  from  April  to  early  June  and  will 
have  “The  Harder  They  Fall”  for  April 
or  May. 

United  Artists.  The  company  heads,  en- 
dorsing the  AB-PT  plan,  have  set  40  re- 
leases for  1956.  Twelve  of  these  are  expected 
to  be  of  “triple  A”  quality  and  will  be  re- 
leased at  the  rate  of  one  a month.  “Alexan- 
der The  Great”  will  be  pre-released  in  April 
(Continued  on  page  20) 


16 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21.  1956 


WHY  THE  TEARS?  LET’S  GET 
CRACKING  IS  WALD  RECIPE 


by  JERRY  WALD 

An  editorial  in  The  HERALD  recently  said  that  when  “any  business  seeking  the 
public’s  interest  and  support  sounds  off  with  mournful  mouthings  of  poor  business,  it 
is  doing  nothing  other  than  increasing  whatever  difficulties  presently  exist.” 

This  is  an  important  truth  to  remember,  and  for  a long  while  it  has  seemed  to 
me  that  there  are  far  too  many  crepe  hangers  and  Calamity  Johns  in  the  film 
business  who,  with  their  laments  and  doom- encrusted  whimperings  about  the  dire 
state  of  the  industry,  are  doing  nothing  more  than  trying  to  pull  a pretty  solidly 
built  house  down  around  their  heads.  I think  it’s  about  time  we  loaned  these  peo- 
ple to  TV,  where  at  least  their  timid  ways  and  small  thoughts  will  suit  the  size  of 
the  screen. 


VVe  are  facing  today  a new  set  of  chal- 
lenges with  a corresponding  new  set  of 
potentials  that  should  cause  us  to  be  opti- 
mistic and  enthusiastic  about  the  job  before 
us  rather  than  gloom-ridden  and  spiritless. 

I don’t  think  there’s  ever  been  a time  when 
Hollywood  hasn’t  worried  about  something. 
If  it  isn’t  high  costs  and  failing  attendance, 
it’s  frozen  currencies  and  foreign  cOinpeti- 
tion ; if  it  isn’t  radio  and  spectator  sports  it’s 
TV  and  labor  troubles.  But  we  must  remem- 
ber that  all  industries  constantly  face  new 
situations  and  new  problems;  and  the  best 
way  to  face  a problem  is  to  try  to  solve  it 
with  vigor,  enthusiasm  and  imagination.  A 
spirit  of  self-deprecation  and  self-defeat 
merely  adds  fuel  to  whatever  destructive  fire 
is  already  burning.  And  it  certainly  doesn’t 
help  matters  to  inform  the  public  that  our 
problems  seem  hopeless.  As  you  say,  “The 
public  has  no  time  for  a back-slider.  It  wants 
the  company  of  a winner.” 

An  attitude  of  enthusiasm  is  always  a con- 
tagious thing.  If  we  let  people  know  that 
we’re  making  finer  films  than  ever  before, 
and  impress  on  them  that  they’ll  miss  an 
exciting  and  rewarding  experience  if  they 
don’t  go  to  see  them,  the  result  of  such  an 
attitude  will  be  bound  to  affect  the  box  office. 

We  must  remember  that  a new  generation 
is  going  to  the  movies,  better  educated,  more 
critical,  alert  and  conscious  of  the  world 
about  them.  They  are  people  who  are  shop- 
ping for  their  films.  They  don’t  just  “go  to 
the  movies”;  they  go  to  see  particular  films. 
It  is  true  that  the  days  of  profitable  assembly- 
line “bread  and  butter”  production  are  past; 
but  the  custom-made,  carefully  prepared  and 
executed  product  has  the  chance  of  making 
greater  profits  today  than  ever  before. 

Quality  the  Key 

Quality  and  originality  today  have  become 
the  key  to  successful  film  production,  and 
as  long  as  the  people  providing  entertain- 
ment recognize  this,  and  attempt  conscien- 
tiously to  achieve  it,  the  motion  picture 
business  will  continue  to  flourish.  In  a 
nation  with  a constantly  growing  population 
and  expanding  amount  of  leisure  time  like 
ours,  we  are  assured  that  people  will  con- 
tinue to  seek,  and  be  glad  to  pay  for, 


JERKY  WALD 


superior  entertainment.  Audiences  con- 
stantly seek  something  new.  There  are  no 
“lost”  audiences;  they’re  just  waiting  for 
the  right  picture.  The  big  box  office  hits 
of  today  are  a constant  reminder  of  this. 

Due  to  its  unlimited  scope  and  its  per- 
manence as  a medium,  the  motion  picture 
will  always  offer  greater  satisfactions,  both 
financial  and  aesthetic,  to  its  creators  than 
any  other  form  of  theatrical  entertainment. 
Television  is  a fleeting  thing,  limited  not 
only  physically  but  also  by  its  need  to  serve 
as  an  advertising  medium.  As  an  anonymous 
television  writer  recently  complained  in  an 
open  letter  to  the  New  York  Times,  there 
is  nothing  quite  so  limiting  from  the  creative 
point  of  view  as  the  “Madison  Avenue 
Mind”;  whereas  the  only  tyranny  the  film 
creator  faces  today  comes  from  the  few  who 
continue  to  think  small  and  pick  old  bones. 

Fortunately,  the  pattern  of  today’s  box 
office  response-  is  forcing  those  who  have 
for  so  long  been  smugly  dishing  up  the 
ancient  formulas  in  the  name  of  entertain- 
ment to  look  in  new  directions.  We  mustn’t 
underestimate  the  public’s  flexibility.  We 
have  to  tackle  original,  off-beat  story  ideas. 
We  have  to  be  willing  to  recognize  and 
give  an  opportunity  to  untested  talent.  Every 


picture  that  is  made  these  days  must  have 
something  new  in  it,  something  to  arrest 
the  audience’s  attention. 

Duty  to  Entertain 

At  the  same  time,  we  must  not  forget 
that  our  first  effort  as  showmen  is  to  delight 
and  entertain.  Too  many  producers,  in  an 
understandable  and  commendable  desire  to 
do  something  significant,  forget  that  they 
must  provide  an  audience  with  the  emotional 
catharsis  that  has  always  been  the  primary 
function  and  lure  of  theatrical  entertainment. 

All  of  the  above  is  not  just  idle  specula- 
tion, but  a recognition  of  facts.  When  these 
facts  are  heeded,  better  films  are  the  result. 
It  is  undoubtedly  due  to  a recognition  of 
these  facts  that  so  many  really  original  and 
exciting  films  are  forthcoming : At  Fox,  for 
instance,  there  are : “The  King  and  I”  and 
“Bus  Stop”;  at  Metro,  “Lust  for  Life”  and 
“Somebody  Up  There  Likes  Me”;  at  War- 
ners, “Moby  Dick” ; at  Paramount,  “War 
and  Peace”;  at  Universal,  “Written  on  the 
Wind”;  at  RKO,  “The  Conqueror;  at  U.A., 
“Alexander,  the  Great” — to  name  a few. 

A 

Eight,  Pictures  Ready 

h 

During  the  past  few  months  at  Columbia, 
out  of  our  awareness  that  we  are  commenc- 
ing a new  and  wonderful  era  of  film  making, 
we  have  completed  eight  top  films  that  all 
have  the  superior  and  special  quality  that 
spells  box  office  in  today’s — and  tomorrow’s 
— market.  They  include  the  film  version  of 
William  Inge’s  Pulitzer  Prize-winning  play, 
“Picnic”;  an  adaptation  ©f  another  Broad- 
way hit,  “The  Solid  Gold  Cadillao”,  a de- 
lightful comedy  with  Judy  Holliday  and 
Paul  Douglas;  an  unusual  drama  of  passion 
and  hate  in  a western  setting,  “Jubal”,  with 
Glenn  Ford,  Ernest  Borgnine  and  Rod 
Steiger ; a scintillating  musical  version  of 
“It  Happened  One  Night”,  starring  June 
Allyson  and  Jack  Lemmon ; a great  true 
story  of  one  man’s  love  and  courage.  “The 
Eddy  Duchin  Story”,  with  Tyrone  Power 
and  Kim  Novak,  and  introducing  a new 
star,  Victoria  Shaw ; an  adaptation  of  Budd 
Schulberg’s  hard-hitting  expose  novel  of  the 
prize  fight  racket,  “The  Harder  They  Fall”, 
with  Humphrey  Bogart,  Rod  Steiger  and 
Jan  Sterling,  and  two  sharply  realistic  pic- 
tures starring  two  of  the  first  ladies  of  the 
screen — Joan  Crawford  in  “Autumn  Leaves” 
and  Bette  Davis  in  “Storm  Center”. 

These  are  all  pictures  that  will  get  talked 
about.  They  are  pictures  that  will  be  re- 
membered. They’ll  do  their  part  to  show 
everyone  that  the  Hollywood  film  industry 
is  alive  and  kicking.  We’re  far  from  licked 
yet,  so  let’s  stop  suggesting  that  we  are. 

And  now  to  work  on  1956 ! 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21.  1956 


17 


BURT  LANCASTER 
. . . Surpassing  his 
triumphs  in  ”From  Here 
To  Eternity"  and  "Come 
Back,  Little  Sheba"! 


SOARINC«  WORD-O 


THE  SCREEN’S  BOLDEST 
STORY  IS  DOING 
THE  BOXOFFICE’S 
BIGGEST  BUSINESS! 


SET  FOR 


I 


■C. 


Sixth  weeh  at  Astoir,"  "I^ew  Yorlt  City 

'• 


sixth  weeh  at  >Vai»aer*s  Bevei*ly 
Los  A.ageles.  Yhese  first  dates 
th  playing  to  huge  crowds! 


F-MOUTH  FOR  ITS  EARTHY  DRAMA! 


tt 


o 


■ 


on  "Ten  Best”  lists!  Honors  for  its  ^reat  actin 
New  York  Film  Critics,  National  Board  of  Review 
many  other  fame-spreading  sources  have  lifted  it  - 
^the  publicity  crest  where  Paramoimt’s  dynamic 
In^ellin^  will  keep  it  for  months  to  come! 


DS  OF 


^Make  your  plans  now  for  bookLn^°it  and  cashing  in 
on  its  tremendous  boxoffice  profits! 


Hal  Wallis’ 

production  of 


TENNESSEE  WILLIAMS 


THE 


stariidtf  MARISA  PAVAN  BEN  COOPER 

with  Viniinia  Grey  • Jo  Van  Fleet  • Sandro  • Directed  by  DANIEL  MAN^J 

Screenplay  by  TENNESSEE  WILLIAM  ^ - Adaptation  by  HAL  KANTER 

Baaed  on  the  Play,  “THE  ROSE  TATTOO”  by  Tennoaaee  Williams 
Music  Score  by  Alex  North  - A PARAMOUNT  PICTURE 


ANNA  MAGNANl 
. . . ” Year’s  Best 
Actress”  in  poll 
after  poll  . . . 
on  list  after  list! 


SECOI^D  FILMS 
BRITISH  TARGET 


. . . Government  film  finance 
unit  warns  producers  of  sharp 
aid  cutback;  production  up  on 
three-reel  shorts 

by  PETER  BURNUP 

LOA'DOX : The  Government's  National 
Film  Finance  Corporation  has  declared 
polite  war  on  the  makers  of  second  features 
here  and  thereby  virtually  put  a number  of 
them  out  of  business. 

It  has  been  known  for  some  time  that  the 
Corporation  was  growing  increasingly  con- 
cerned over  the  economic  cutback  in  second- 
feature  finance.  As  in  the  U.  S.,  first  fea- 
tures are  appearing  in  greater  length  and 
bookers  find  it  more  and  more  difficult  to 
fit  the  conventional  second  feature  into  a 
programme  pattern. 

Warned  Producers 

It  is  learned  that  the  Corporation  has 
formally  warned  the  Producers’  Association 
that  state  backing  of  second  features  will 
require  to  be  drastically  cut  down.  Twenty- 
seven  second-features  have  been  part- 
financed  by  NFFC  in  the  last  three  years. 
Of  these,  16  had  losses  in  excess  of  an  ag- 
gregate amount  of  £90,000.  Against  that, 
it  is  understood  that  the  remaining  11  made 
a gross  profit  of  £38,000. 

Experienced  authorities  insist  that  two 
essentials  are  necessary  in  a successful  sec- 
ond feature  production  this  side;  firstly,  that 
the  production  does  not  cost  more  than 
£15,000  and,  secondly,  that  the  picture  be 
guaranteed  a circuit  deal. 

Significantly,  a considerable  increase  is 
to  be  observed  here  in  the  production  of 
three-reel  featurettes.  Circuit  men  in  par- 
ticular find  productions  of  such  a length 
more  readily  fitted  into  the  current  design 
of  the  programmes. 

Rank  Plans  Announced 

The  Rank  Organisation,  whose  annual 
Showmanship  Contests  among  its  theatre 
managers  have  always  been  acknowledged 
as  a happy  spur  to  bigger  and  better  busi- 
ness, has  now  launched  an  entirely  new 
business-building  scheme. 

Claimed  to  be  revolutionary  in  its  con- 
ception and  scope,  the  scheme  offers  every 
manager  in  the  Organisation  the  chance  to 
earn  very  considerable  cash  bonuses.  Named 
le  “C.M.A.  Prosperity  Sharing  Plan,”  the 
scheme  will  run  for  six  months  until  June 
23.  C.M.A. , of  course,  stands  for  Circuits 
Management  Association,  the  bwly  which 
controls  the  600  Rank  theatres. 

A brochure  explaining  the  plan  has  been 


issued  to  all  C.M.A.  theatres.  It  makes  clear 
that  the  “Prosperity  Sharing  Plan”  is  not 
a contest  or  drive.  While  it  offers  unpre- 
cedented opportunities  for  boosting  both  the 
company’s  turnover  and  manager’s  individ- 
ual rewards,  the  plan  specifically  avoids  all 
elements  of  inter-theatre  or  inter-district 
competition. 

Target  Figures  Set 

Basis  of  the  “Prosperity  Sharing  Plan” 
is  that  each  theatre  will  be  allotted  a series 
of  box  office  target  figures  calculated  on 
trading  returns  over  the  same  period  a 
year  ago.  These  targets  will  be  adjusted 
to  allow  for  differences  in  tax  and  admission 
prices,  stage  shows  and  other  special  cir- 
cumstances. Points  will  be  added  or  sub- 
tracted as  a theatre  exceeds  or  misses  its 
targets. 

A similar  points-over-target  scheme  will 
apply  to  theatre  sales.  A special  additional 
sales  “bonus”  points  system  ensures  that 
managers  who  have  been  consistently  suc- 
cessful in  the  field  in  the  past  are  not  now 
unfairly  handicapped.  At  the  end  of  the 
plan,  cash  bonuses  based  on  the  number  of 
plus-points  held  will  be  paid  to  managers 
and  assistant  managers. 

Theatres  within  the  C.M.A.  group  are 
now,  for  normal  administrative  purposes, 
split  up  into  19  geographical  districts.  Under 
the  “Prosperity  Sharing  Plan”  each  district 
will  be  set  its  own  targets.  Points  in  excess 
of  those  targets  will  be  shared  by  all  theatres 
within  the  district. 

In  a letter  to  all  the  Group  managers, 
Kenneth  Winckles,  C.M.A. ’s  assistant  man- 
aging director,  describes  the  plan  as  being 
“thoroughly  realistic,  interesting  and  novel.” 
Every  manager  and  assistant  manager  tak- 
ing part  in  the  down-to-earth  scheme  has 
a fair  and  equitable  chance  in  the  increased 
prosperity  brought  about  by  his  own  efforts, 
says  Mr.  Winckles. 

Wage  Deal  Ratified 

SEA’s  general  council  ratified  by  an  over- 
whelming majority  the  draft  wages  agree- 
ment with  NATKE. 

The  association’s  president,  Robert  God- 
frey, told  the  meeting  that  various  anoma- 
lies had  become  apparent  in  the  zonal  wage 
rates  but  that  both  sides  felt  that  ratification 
should  be  effective  at  once,  leaving  difficul- 
ties in  detail  to  be  worked  out  subsequently. 

NATKE  also  has  ratified  the  agreement 
on  condition  that  the  ironing-out  process  be 
started  forthwith. 

• 

In  the  six  months  ending  November,  1955, 
receipts  by  the  Customs  and  Excise  from 
cinema  entertainment  tax  were  down  by 
£1,158,000  on  the  comparable  period  for 


1954.  Tax  receipts  for  the  month  of  Novem- 
ber, 1955,  were  £2,645,000  compared  with 
£2,826,000  in  November,  1954;  a drop  of 
£181,000. 

• 

Pye,  Ltd.,  among  the  leaders  here  in  the 
TV  and  radio  manufacturing  field,  is  spread- 
ing into  television  camera  lenses  for  the 
first  time.  Charles  Stanley,  Pye’s  chairman, 
announces  that  he  has  bought  a “substantial 
interest”  in  W.  Watson  & Sons. 

Watson’s  started  120  years  ago.  It  makes 
camera  lenses  for  TV  networks  the  world 
over.  Cash  involved  in  the  deal  is  not  re- 
vealed. It  was  reported  last  August  12  that 
the  Watson  firm  is  manufacturing  the  Hi- 
Lux  Val  anamorphic  lens  in  accordance 
with  the  arrangement  whereby  Westrex 
markets  the  lens  under  franchise  from  Pro- 
jection Optics. 

RELEASES 

{Continued  from  page  16) 

and  have  most  of  its  regular  engagements 
in  May  and  June. 

Universal.  Charles  Feldman,  vice-presi- 
dent in  charge  of  distribution,  agreed  with 
AB-PT  plan  and  said  that  Universal  ha# 
never  paid  “the  same  marked  attention  to 
these  holidays  as  do  the  other  distributors.” 
He  added  that  his  company  finds  the  Jan- 
uary-April  period  slack  and  generally  puts 
on  its  drives  in  these  four  months.  Mr. 
Feldman  also  pointed  out  the  evils  of  free- 
lancing stars  competing  against  themselves 
and  the  problems  of  a handful  of  stars  who 
“virtually  control  Hollywood,”  leading  to 
Universal’s  interest  in  new  faces. 

Republic.  The  company  took  the  AB- 
PT  plan  under  advisement  and  has  shifted 
its  release  schedules  to  put  “Doctor  at  Sea” 
into  release  in  March ; “The  Maverick 
Queen”  in  May,  and  “Lisbon”  in  June. 

RKO.  Walter  Branson,  world  wide  sales 
manager,  endorsed  AB-PT  plan  “100  per 
cent”  and  will  bring  it  to  the  attention  of 
coast  officials  shortly. 

Buena  Vista.  Although  it  has  no  re- 
lease scheduled  for  Thanksgiving  at  present, 
Leo  Samuels,  president,  advised  AB-PT 
that  “it  is  highly  possible  that  the  release 
schedule  will  be  revised  so  that  a very  im- 
portant picture  will  be  available  for  Thanks- 
giving.” 

Allied  Artists.  The  company  agrees  with 
the  AB-PT  plan  and  pointed  out  that  last 
year  it  had  released  one  of  its  all-time  record 
breakers,  “The  Phenix  City  Story,”  in  the 
post  Labor  Day  period.  It  hopes  to  have 
William  Wyler’s  “The  Friendly  Persuasion” 
for  June  release,  and  for  May  has  Walter 
Wanger’s  “Mother-Sir”  and  “Crime  in  the 
Streets,”  based  on  the  television  presenta- 
tion. 

Mr.  Hyman  noted  that  of  the  332  pictures 
to  he  released  in  1956,  80  are  expected  to 
he  of  “triple  A”  quality.  He  added:  “If 
this  is  true,  we  can  only  say  that  this  num- 
ber of  quality  pictures  e.xceeds  the  number 
of  ‘triple  A’  pictures  released  in  any  one 
year  that  we  have  ever  seen.” 


20 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  21,  1955 


PRESENTS  1956’s 

MOST  EXCITING  NEW  SCREEN  PERSONALITY 


Soon  to 
be  seen 


American 


picture 


co-starring 


ROCK  HUDSON 


IgORNELL  BORCHERS 


'GEORGE  SANDERS 


''Universal-International  is  searching  the  whole  world  for 

new  personalities ,, ,new  faces  with  proven  talent'.'— ALFRED  E.  DAFF 


B ax  Office  Champions 
For  Becember^  1053 

The  box  office  champions  for  the  mo-nth  of  December,  listed  alphabetically  belo-w,  are 
selected  on  the  basis  of  reports  from  key  city  first  run  theatres  throughout  the  country. 


Foetv  ^s  J^et 
For  Fear  at 
S 5,51  C 755 

A consolidated  net  profit  after  taxes  of 
S^,31 1,733,  equivalent  to  $1.03  per  share 
for  the  fiscal  year  ended  August  31,  1955 
was  ref)orted  this  week  by  Loew’s,  Inc.,  in 
Arthur  Loew’s  first  report  to  stockholders 
as  president.  This  compared  with  $6,577,311, 
equivalent  to  $1.28  per  share,  tlie  year  before. 

The  earnings  represent  Loew’s,  Inc.,  and 
its  subsidiaries,  including  theatres.  Operat- 
ing revenues  amounted  to  $170,952,059, 
compared  with  $183,142,486  last  year. 

The  report  stated  that  “while  the  earnings 
for  the  first  three  quarters  of  the  fiscal  year 
were  approximately  the  same  as  in  the  cor- 
responding period  of  the  prior  year,  there 
was  a decided  drop  in  operating  revenue  in 
the  last  quarter  of  said  1955  fiscal  year,  re- 
sulting largely  from  disappointing  box  office 
returns  on  pictures  distributed  in  that  quar- 
ter as  compared  with  more  successful  pic- 
tures distributed  in  the  corresponding  quar- 
ter of  the  previous  year.  This  decline  in 
operating  revenue  with  resulting  diminishing 
earnings  has  continued  in  the  current  fiscal 
j’ear.” 

The  statement  for  the  first  12  weeks  ended 
Xovember  24,  1955,  which  accompanied  the 
annual  report,  indicated  net  profit  after  all 
taxes  and  charges  (subject  to  year-end  ad- 
justment) of  $248,161,  equivalent  to  five 
cents  per  share  compared  with  $1,521,349 
or  30  cents  per  share  in  the  corresponding 
period  the  preceding  year. 

The  report  said  Loew’s  will  expand  its 
production-distribution  program  to  include 
not  only  films  made  at  its  studios  but  also 
product  from  outstanding  independent  pro- 
ducers and  stars,  some  of  which  will  be 
partly  or  wholly  financed  by  the  company. 

Mr.  Loew  said  that  in  international  opera- 
tions the  Metro  theatre  in  Buenos  Aires  was 
the  newest  and  that  Metro  theatres  will  be 
established  in  Germany.  The  company’s 
Xew  York  radio  station,  WMGM,  increased 
its  audience  by  30  per  cent  and  the  initial 
step  in  television,  “MGM  Parade,”  had 
proved  financially  profitable,  it  was  added. 

Screen  Producers  Guild 
Banquet  January  22 

HOLLYWOOD : Comedian  Jerry  Lewis 
will  be  toastmaster  at  the  Screen  Producers 
Guild  1956  ^Milestone  Awards  banquet  to  be 
held  in  the  grand  ballroom  of  the  Beverly 
Hilton  Hotel  January  22,  it  was  announced 
by  Samuel  G.  Engel,  .SPG  president.  The 
annual  event  will  this  year  honor  Cecil  B. 
DeMille,  veteran  Hollywood  producer-direc- 
tor for  his  “historic  contributions  to  the 
American  motion  picture.”  The  award  each 
year  cites  an  individual  whose  efforts  and 
achievements  constitute  a milestone  in  mo- 
tion picture  history. 


The  African  Lion 

( Buena  Vista  Film  Distr.  Co.) 

Produced  by  Walt  Disney.  Directed  by 
James  Algar.  Written  by  James  Algar, 
Winston  Hibler,  Ted  Sears  and  Jack  Mof- 
fitt.  Technicolor.  A True-Life  Adventure. 

The  Big  Knife 

(United  Artists) 

Produced  and  directed  by  Robert 
Aldrich.  Written  by  James  Poe  (from 
the  stage  play  by  Clifford  Odets).  Cast: 
Jack  Palance,  Ida  Lupino,  Wendell  Corey, 
Jean  Hagen,  Rod  Steiger,  Ilka  Chase, 
Everett  Sloane,  Wesley  Addy. 

Good  Morning,  Miss  Dove 

(20th  Century-Fox) 

CinemaScope 

Produced  by  Samuel  G.  Engel.  Directed 
by  Henry  Koster.  Written  by  Eleanore 
Griffin  (from  the  novel  by  Frances  Gray 
Patton).  Color  by  De  Luxe.  Cast:  Jennifer 
Jones,  Robert  Stack,  Kipp  Hamilton,  Robert 
Douglas,  Peggy  Knudsen,  Marshall  Thomp- 
son, Chuck  Connors. 

Guys  and  Dolls 

( Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) 

CinemaScope 


Philadelphia  Theatre 
Files  Trust  Suit 

PHILADELPHIA  : Owners  of  the  Arcadia 
theatre,  first  run  house  here,  have  filed  a 
$350,000  damage  suit  against  seven  dis- 
tributing companies  and  two  circuits.  The 
suit,  filed  in  U..S.  District  Court,  charges  the 
defendants  witli  conspiring  to  give  prefer- 
ence to  the  Stanley-Warner  and  William 
Goldman  theatres  in  supplying  first  run  fea- 
ture films.  Plaintiffs  are  Merton  Shapiro, 
Bernard  Shapiro,  Morton  J.  Sablosky  and 
Lillian  Schultz.  They  charge  the  Arcadia 
has  not  been  able  to  get  first  run  pictures 
since  June,  1950.  Claiming  losses  of  $350,000 
since  1950,  the  plaintiffs  asked  the  court  for 
an  injunction  barring  the  distributors  and 
circuits  from  continuing  alleged  conspiracy. 


Warren  Low  Is  Elected 
Cinema  Editors  Head 

HOLLYWOOD : Warren  Low  has  been 
elected  president  of  the  American  Cinema 
Editors,  the  organization  has  announced. 


Produced  by  Samuel  Goldwyn.  Directed 
by  Joseph  L.  Mankiewicz.  Written  by 
Joseph  L.  Mankiewicz  (from  the  book  by 
Jo  Swerling  and  Abe  Burrows  from  a 
Damon  Runyon  story).  In  Eastman  Color. 
Cast:  Marlon  Brando,  Jean  Simmons,  Frank 
Sinatra,  Vivian  Blaine,  Robert  Keither, 
Stubby  Kaye,  B.  S.  Pully,  Johnny  Silver, 
Sheldon  Leonard. 

Rebel  Without  a Cause 

(Warner  Bros.) 

CinemaScope 

Produced  by  David  NA/eisbart.  Directed 
by  Nicholas  Ray.  Written  by  Stewart 
Stern.  Adapted  by  Irving  Shulman  (from 
a story  by  Nicholas  Ray).  In  WarnerColor. 
Cast:  James  Dean,  Natalie  Wood,  Sal 
Mineo,  Jim  Backus,  Ann  Doran,  Corey 
Allen.  (Champion  for  the  second 
month). 

The  Tender  Trap 

(Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) 

CinemaScope 

Produced  by  Lawrence  Weingarten. 
Directed  by  Charles  Walters.  Written  by 
Julius  Epstein.  In  Eastman  Color.  Cast: 
Frank  Sinatra,  Debbie  Reynolds,  David 
Wayne,  Celeste  Holm,  Jarma  Lewis,  Lola 
Albright,  Carolyn  Jones,  Howard  St.  John. 


He  succeeds  Richard  Cahoon.  Others  elect- 
ed are  Jack  W.  Ogilvie,  vice  president; 
Ellsworth  Hoagland,  secretary  and  Daniel 
A.  Nathan,  treasurer. 


Albert  Taylor  Joins  RKO 

HOLLYWOOD : Albert  B.  Taylor  has 
been  named  executive  in  charge  of  negotiat- 
ing major  star,  director  and  writer  commit- 
ments, it  is  announced  by  his  new  employers,^ 
RKO  Radio  Pictures.  Mr.  Taylor,  co-' 
producer  of  the  Broadway  hit.  Damn 
Yankees,”  was  formerly  with  the  \\  illiam 
Morris  Agency  in  Hollywood.  More  recently 
he  was  at  CBS-TV  in  New  \ork. 


G/ps  with  Mel  Gold 

Robert  E.  Gips  has  been  elected  vice-pres- 
ident in  charge  of  production  and  a director 
of  Mel  Gold  Productions,  Inc.,  it  is  an- 
nounced by  Melvin  L.  Gold,  president.  Mr. 
Gips,  formerly  production  supervisor,  joined 
the  company  in  November,  1954,  after  two 
years  as  television  assistant  at  National 
Screen  Service. 


22 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21,  1956 


UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL  Presents 

The  sensational  star  of 


» /Sf  ^ 

■Ui 

AUDIE  MURPHY  BARBARA  RUSH 


COSTA., .0  JEFF  MORROW  * JOHN  MdNTIRE 

iTH  TOMMY  RAIL -HOWARD  ST.  JOHN -CHICO  VEJAR-ART  ARAGON -CISCO  ANDRADE 

Directed  by  JESSE  HIBBS  ■ Screenplay  by  JACK  SHER  ’ Produced  by  AARON  ROSENBERG 

4^07f/£R7>/C7t/fi£  h/m/ THAT  Pf^SOLO  APP&U./ 


Aitschulcr 
Dw  *ive  BeguiM 
A^t  Bepublie 

Republic  Pictures  branch  managers,  sales- 
men and  bookers  throughout  the  country 
have  just  inaugurated  “Republic’s  1956 
Salute  to  Dick  Alt- 
schuler,” and  are 
seeking  exhibitor 
backing  to  assist 
them  in  winning 
their  share  of  the 
$100,000  bonus 
which  is  offered  in 
the  tribute  drive  to 
the  company’s  world- 
wide sales  director. 

In  announcing  the 
drive,  Herbert  J. 
Yates,  president, 
said  that  a roster  of 
top  productions  will 
back  the  sales  organization  in  its  booking 
drive.  Branches  will  be  assisted  by  a six- 
month  release  schedule  highlighted  by  such 
productions  as  “Come  Next  Spring,”  star- 
ring Ann  Sheridan  and  Steve  Cochran,  in 
Trucolor,  for  which  premiere  plans  now  are 
being  set ; J.  Arthur  Rank’s  “Doctor  at  Sea,” 
starring  Dirk  Bogarde,  in  color  by  Tech- 
nicolor and  VistaVision,  and  “Magic  Fire,” 
starring  Yvonne  DeCarlo  and  Carlos 
Thompson,  in  Trucolor. 

The  company’s  initial  productions  in  wide 
screen  Naturama  are  in  the  schedule.  The 
first  is  “The  Maverick  Queen,”  starring 
Barbara  Stanwyck  and  Barry  Sullivan,  in 
Trucolor.  Shooting  has  just  been  completed 
on  “Lisbon,”  starring  Ray  Milland  and 
Maureen  O’Hara,  filmed  in  Portugal.  Other 
productions  which  will  follow  include 
“Stranger  at  My  Door,”  starring  Mac- 
Donald Carey  and  Patricia  Medina;  “Dakota 
Incident,”  starring  Linda  Darnell  and  Dale 
Robertson,  in  Trucolor,  and  “Acapulco,” 
starring  Ralph  Meeker  and  Janice  Rule,  to 
be  filmed  in  Mexico  in  Trucolor  with  Paul 
Henreid  directing. 

The  drive  is  coordinated  by  Walter  L. 
Titus,  Jr.,  with  sales  districts  captained  by 
John  Curtain,  north;  John  Alexander,  mid- 
west; E.  C.  Grainger,  south,  and  Francis 
Bateman,  west. 

New  Drive-In  Theatre 
At  Orangetown,  N,  Y, 

A 2,062  car  capacity  drive-in  theatre  will 
be  erected  on  a 31 -acre  tract  at  Orangetown, 
N.  Y.,  the  303  Drive-in  Theatre  Corpora- 
tion has  announced.  The  group  comprises 
Joseph  M.  Seider  of  Prudential  Theatres ; 
Charles  B.  Moss  of  the  B.  S.  Moss  Thea- 
tres; Spyros  Skouras,  Jr.  of  Skouras  Thea- 
tres Corporation  and  Samuel  Rinzler  of 
Randforce  Amusement  Corp.  An  early 
spring  opening  is  planned. 


BING'S  RING 

When  an  invited  audience  of  press 
and  exhibitors  attended  the  preview 
in  New  York  last  week  of  Paramount's 
"Anything  Goes,"  they  were  ad- 
dressed via  coast-to-coast  phone  by 
Bing  Crosby,  one  of  the  film's  stars, 
before  the  start  of  the  film  at  Loew's 
72nd  Street  theatre.  The  star  wel- 
comed the  audience,  and  mentioned 
the  names  of  many  representatives  of 
the  press  present  in  the  theatre.  It 
was  all  bright,  unusual  and  publicity- 
conscious. 


72  Censors  Fired  from 
Pennsylvania  Board 

PHILADELPHIA : Governor  George  M. 
Leader  of  Pennsylvania  has  ordered  12 
members  of  the  State  Board  of  Motion  Pic- 
ture Censors  fired  because  of  lack  of  funds. 
Michael  Felt,  executive  director  of  the 
board,  said  this  may  pave  the  way  for  a 
Hood  of  obscene  films  and,  even  without  the 
firings,  the  board  has  been  operating  under 
a severe  handicap.  He  said  he  would  now 
have  a skeleton  staff  and  it  would  be  im- 
possible to  do  an  efficient  job.  In  Kansas, 
he  added,  many  obscene  films  were  shown 
after  it  lost  its  censorship  board. 

New  Chairmen  Announced 
For  Brotherhood  Drive 

William  J.  Heineman  and  Spyros  S. 
Skouras,  Jr.,  national  co-chairmen  of  the 
Brotherhood  Week  Drive  sponsored  by  the 
National  Conference  of  Christians  and  Jews, 
announced  the  appointment  this  week  of  13 
additional  local  exhibitor  chairmen  for  the 
1956  campaign.  They  are:  Eddie  Arthur  of 
St.  Louis;  Jack  Beresin,  Philadelphia;  Bill 
Connors,  Seattle;  Harry  Feinstein,  New 
Haven ; Lou  Fensky,  Jacksonville ; Moe 
Horwitz,  Cleveland;  George  Kerasotes, 
Springfield,  111. ; Charles  Kurtzman,  Boston ; 
Irving  Long,  Louisville;  Ted  Mann,  Minne- 
apolis; Moe  Mesher,  Portland,  Ore.;  Frank 
Ricketson,  Denver,  and  Morton  Thalhimer, 
Richmond. 

Jack  Warner  Writes  Mayors 
On  "Helen"  Premieres 

Jack  L.  Warner,  executive  producer,  has 
sent  a letter  to  the  mayors  of  the  126  cities, 
in  nrore  than  50  countries,  where  Warners’ 
“Helen  of  Troy”  will  have  a simultaneous 
world  premiere  January  26.  The  message 
said  this  premiere  is  “a  graphic  demonstra- 
tion of  what  can  be  done  to  promote  inter- 
national amity”  and  showed  “the  power  of 
great  entertainment,  through  the  medium  of 
the  motion  picture,  to  bring  the  nations  of 
the  world  in  closer  harmony.”  The  picture 
stars  Rossana  Podesta  and  Jack  .Sernas. 


Dick  Altschuler 


jSee  Qain  in 
Bevenue;  I\fa 
Tax  Cut  Bue 

WASHINGTON : The  Treasury  Depart- 
ment expects  a slight  increase  in  Federal  ad- 
mission tax  receipts  during  the  next  18 
months. 

This  was  revealed  in  the  budget  message 
sent  Congress  this  week  by  President  Eisen- 
hower. The  budget  estimated  that  general 
admission  tax  collections  in  the  current  year, 
ending  June  30,  would  be  about  $108,000,- 
000,  and  in  the  following  year  about  $110,- 
000,000,  compared  to  actual  receipts  of 
$106,086,000  in  the  year  ending  June  30. 

The  President  again  urged  Congress  to 
continue  all  Federal  tax  rates  at  present 
levels  for  the  time  being.  His  language  was 
almost  word-for-word  the  same  as  in  the 
State  of  the  Union  message  sent  Congress 
earlier  this  month.  Other  highlights  in  the 
budget  showed  a sharp  increase  in  requested 
anti-trust  funds,  an  almost  tripling  in  the 
funds  sought  for  the  Government’s  overseas 
film  program,  and  increased  funds  asked  for 
the  Federal  Communications  Commission. 

Funds  Asked  for  USIA 

The  President  asked  $135,000,000  for  the 
U.  S.  Information  Agency  for  the  coming 
fiscal  year  starting  July  1,  compared  with 
$85,336,630  in  the  current  year  and  $74,099,- 
000  last  year.  He  said  the  motion  picture 
service  should  get  $12,883,000  of  the  total 
for  the  coming  year,  compared  with  only 
$4,446,818  this  year  and  $3,667,147  last. 

In  the  anti-trust  field,  the  budget  proposes 
appropriations  of  $4,265,000  for  the  Justice 
Department’s  anti-trust  division  for  the  com- 
ing year,  as  against  $3,314,000  this  year.  A 
total  of  $5,500,000  was  sought  for  the  Fed- 
eral Trade  Commission,  which  had  only  $4,- 
262,500  this  year. 

An  increase  from  $6,870,000  this  year  to 
$7,850,000  next  year  was  sought  for  the 
Federal  Communications  Commission.  The 
budget  earmarked  $140,000  of  the  coming 
year's  funds  to  continue  the  FCC’s  television 
network  study.  The  President  renewed  his 
recommendation  of  last  year  for  a special 
Government  agency  to  stimulate  creative  ar- 
tistic activity  and  for  special  awards  for 
outstanding  creative  achievements. 

The  President  also  asked  funds  to  start 
preparations  for  a new  comprehensive  census 
of  business  and  manufacturing,  to  be  taken 
in  1959.  One  was  just  taken  last  year,  and 
the  results  of  that  should  be  coming  out  in 
another  month  or  two. 


Postpone  Sullivan  Film 

Warners  has  agreed  to  release  Ed  Sullivan 
from  his  commitment  to  make  “The  Ed 
Sullivan  Story”  this  season  because  his  tele- 
vision program  and  other  commitments 
prevent  him  from  leaving  New  York  for 
the  eiglit  weeks  needed  to  make  the  film. 


24 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21,  1956 


MtKO  Miutiffets 
$22,500,000 
F'ar  II  Filwns 

HOLLYWOOD : An  over-all  budget  of 
$22,500,000  for  11  pictures  to  be  produced 
by  RKO  Radio  Pictures  during  the  first  six 
months  of  1956  has  been  announced  by 
Daniel  T.  O’Shea,  president  of  the  com- 
pany. It  is  the  intent  of  the  company,  Mr. 
O’Shea  added,  to  maintain  a steady  flow  of 
product  throughout  the  year. 

The  11  pictures  include:  “The  First 
Traveling  Saleslady,”  with  Ginger  Rogers; 
“Back  from  Eternity,”  with  Robert  Ryan 
and  Keith  Andes;  “Tension  at  Table  Rock,” 
a Western;  “Beyond  a Reasonable  Doubt,” 
starring  Dana  Andrews;  “Stage  Struck,” 
starring  Jean  Simmons;  “A  Bundle  of  Joy,” 
co-starring  Debbie  Reynolds  and  Eddie 
Fisher;  “A  Farewell  to  Arms,”  with  Jen- 
nifer Jones;  “Misty,”  with  an  all-star  cast; 
“The  Syndicate,”  King  Bros,  production; 
“Cash  McCall,”  Cameron  Hawley’s  current 
novel,  and  “Is  This  Our  Son  ?”  from  a 
story  by  Robert  Dozier. 

The  company  has  also  announced  that 
Walter  Wanger  will  produce  si.x  pictures  for 
it  in  the  next  three  years.  In  the  agreement 
is  an  arrangement  whereby  ^Ir.  Wanger 
will  make  “Underworld,  USA”  with  Hum- 
phrey Bogart  and  Lauren  Bacall  late  in  the 
year  for  Mapleton  Productions,  of  which 
Mr.  Bogart  is  president,  with  distribution 
through  United  Artists. 

At  the  same  time  it  was  announced  by 
the  company  that  William  Bloom  has  re- 
ported to  the  studio  as  a producer.  He  was 
formerly  editorial  assistant  to  Harry  Cohn 
at  Columbia  and  more  recently  was  a pro- 
ducer at  20th  Century-Fox. 


Goldstein  Planning  Four 
United  Artists  Releases 

HOLLYWOOD : Bob  Goldstein,  producer, 
will  make  four  pictures  this  year  for  United 
Artists  release,  it  is  announced  by  Arthur 
B.  Krim,  U.A.  president.  These  are : “Show- 
down Creek,”  a novel  by  Lucas  Todd;  “Love 
Story,”  a melodrama  by  Jo  Eisinger ; “Dance 
with  Me,  Henry,”  an  Abbott-Costello  ve- 
hicle, and  “Brass  Legend,”  a suspense 
Western  by  George  Zuckerman  and  Jess 
Arnold. 


Buys  "Lady  and  Prowler" 

HOLLYWOOD : “The  Lady  and  the 

Prowler,”  drama  about  a wife  who  plots  the 
death  of  her  husband,  has  been  bought  by 
RKO  Radio  from  F.  W.  Durkee,  Jr.  and  is 
scheduled  for  production  in  late  June.  John 
Farrow  will  produce  and  direct.  The  film 
will  be  the  second  in  Mr.  Farrow’s  three- 
picture  contract  with  RKO  His  first,  “Back 
* from  Eternity,”  with  Robert  Ryan  and  Keith 
Andes,  will  start  filming  in  February. 


^JJ'oituwood  Sc 


^cene 


llollyzvood  Bureau 

Six  pictures,  each  destined  for  a different 
release  channel,  were  started  by  un-super- 
stitious  Hollywood  during  the  work  week 
terminating  Friday  the  13th.  This  activity, 
offset  only  to  the  extent  of  three  completions 
of  other  pictures,  lifted  the  over-all  shoot- 
ing total  to  31. 

Alphabetically  by  release  channel : 

Allied  Artists’  Richard  Hermance  started 
“Cattle  King,”  with  George  Montgomery 
and  Richard  Eyer,  directed  by  Harmon 
Jones. 

Columbia’s  Harry  Joe  Brown  began 
shooting  “Return  of  Custer,”  with  Randolph 
Scott,  Barbara  Hale,  Harry  Carey,  Jr.,  and 
Jay  C.  Flippen,  directed  by  Joseph  H. 
Lewis. 

Independent  production  is  represented  in 
the  new  undertakings  by  Charles  Martin 
Productions,  which  began  filming  “Death 
of  a Scoundrel”  with  George  Sanders, 
Yvonne  de  Carlo,  Zsa  Zsa  Gabor,  Nancy 
Gates,  George  Brent  and  Coleen  Gray. 
Martin  is  directing,  as  well  as  producing, 
and  Herbert  Klein  is  associate  producer. 

MGM’s  new  project  is  “The  Fastest  Gun 
Alive,”  produced  by  Clarence  Greene  and 
directed  by  Russell  Rouse,  which  has  Glenn 
Ford,  Jeanne  Crain  and  Brod  Crawford  in 
principal  roles. 

United  Artists  will  release  the  Associates 
and  Aldrich  Production  of  “Fragile  Fox,” 
which  has  Jack  Palance,  Eddie  Albert,  Lee 
Marvin,  Robert  Strauss  and  Buddy  Ebsen 
in  the  cast.  Robert  Aldrich  is  producer- 
director. 

Universal-International’s  Stanley  Rubin 
started  “Behind  the  High  Wall,”  directed 
by  Abner  Biberman,  with  Tom  Tully,  Syl- 
via Sidney  and  Betty  Linn. 

Completions  of  the  week  were  Republic’s 
“Dakota  Incident”  and  U-I’s  “Johnny  Sal- 
vo” and  “Written  on  the  Wind.” 


February  Release  Set 
For  5 Columbia  Films 

Five  Columbia  features  are  set  for  Febru- 
ary release,  A.  Montague,  the  company’s 
general  sales  manager,  has  announced.  “Pic- 
nic” heads  the  list  which  includes  “Joe 
Macbeth,”  “The  Houston  Story,”  “Battle 
Stations”  and  “Fury  at  Gunsight  Pass.” 


Koster  Signs  New  Deal 

Henry  Koster,  director  for  Twentieth 
Century-Fox  since  1948,  has  been  signed  to 
a long-term  exclusive  contract,  it  is  an- 
nounced by  the  studio.  Mr.  Koster’s  credits 
include  “The  Robe,”  “A  Man  Called  Peter,” 
and  “Good  Morning,  Miss  Dove.”  He  is 
currently  directing  “The  Sixth  of  June”  with 
Robert  Taylor  and  Richard  Todd. 


Illlllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

THIS  WEEK  IN 
PRODUCTION: 


STARTED  (6) 

ALLIED  ARTISTS 

Cattle  King  (Cinema- 
Scope:  Eastman 
Color) 

COLUMBIA 

Return  of  Custer 
( Producers-Actors 
Corp.;  Technicolor) 

INDEPENDENT 

Death  of  a Scoundrel 

COMPLETED  (3) 

REPUBLIC 

Dakota  Incident 
(Trucolor) 


SHOOTING  (25) 

COLUMBIA 

Rock  Around  the  Clock 
Black  Mamba  (Todon 
Prods.;  CinemaScope; 
Technicolor) 

Zarak  Khan  (Warwick; 
CinemaScope: 
Technicolor) 

Portrait  in  Smoke 
( Films  Locations) 

INDEPENDENT 

Count  the  Dead 
(Nacirema  Prods.) 
Tarzan  and  the  Lost 
Safari  (Sol  Lesser 
Prods.; 

Eastman  Color) 

MGM 

The  Catered  Affair 
The  Living  Idol 
(Al  Lewin; 
CinemaScope: 

Eastman  Color) 

PARAMOUNT 

The  Leather  Saint 
(VistaVision) 

Pardners  (VistaVision; 

Technicolor) 

Ten  Commandments 
(VistaVision; 
Technicolor) 

REPUBLIC 

Lisbon  (Naturama; 
Trucolor) 


(Charles  Martin 
Prods.) 

MGM 

The  Fastest  Gun  Alive 

UNITED  ARTISTS 

Fragile  Fox  (Associates 
& Aldrich) 

U-l 

Behind  the  High  Wall 


U-l 

Johnny  Salvo 
Written  on  the  Wind 
(Technicolor) 


20TH-FOX 

Hilda  Crane 
(CinemaScope: 

De  Luxe  Color) 

The  Proud  Ones 
(CinemaScope: 

De  Luxe  Color) 

The  Sixth  of  June 
The  Man  in  the  Gray 
Flannel  Suit 
(^CinemaScope: 

De  Luxe  Color) 

23  Paces  to  Baker  Street 
(CinemaScope; 

De  Luxe  Color)' 

Revolt  of  Mamie  Stover 
(CinemaScope; 

De  Luxe  Color) 

The  King  and  1 
( CinemaScope: 

De  Luxe  Color) 

UNITED  ARTISTS 

Rebel  in  Town 
( Bel-Air  Prods.) 

Flight  to  Hong  Kong 
(Sabre  Prods.) 

U-l 

The  Gentle  Web 
(Technicolor) 

WARNER  BROS. 

Baby  Doll 

(Newtown  Prods.) 

The  Spirit  of  St.  Louis 
(CinemaScope; 
WarnerColor) 
Santiago 

(WarnerColor] 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  21,  1956 


25 


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|<  rriiii  iii'ii'^  II I TiTii]iiMtfii4  .tl 


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HERBERT  J.  YATES 


presents 


YVONNE  DE  CARLO 


TRUCOLOR  BY  CONSOLIDATED  FILM  INDUSTRIES 

HOWARD  DUFF  ZACHARY  SCOTT 

with  KURT  KASZNAR- BARBARA  O'NEIL -JAMES  ARNESS- FRIEDA  INESCORT 


Sf/ 


m 


SCREENPLAY  BY 

BRUCE  MANNING 


STORY  BY 

ADELE  COMANDINI 


ASSOCIATE  PRODUCER-DIRECTOR 

EDWARD  LUDWIG 


A REPUBLIC  PRODUCTION 


ALBANY 

How  and  how  often  prices  should  be 
newspaper-advertised  is  a matter  of  debate 
among  area  operators  of  theatres  changing 
scales  for  so-called  special  films.  So  is  the 
matter  of  what  periods  in  the  year  and  what 
releases  warrant  extra  tabs.  The  circuits 
divided  on  this  during  the  recent  holidays. 
. . . St.  Lawrence  Investors,  Inc.,  operating 
.Alec  Papayanakos’  American  in  Canton, 
filed  a supplemental  action  under  the  anti- 
trust laws  for  $600,000  damages  against  five 
Schine  defendants  and  eight  major  distribu- 
tors, involving  Schine’s  Strand  at  Ogdens- 
burg — to  cover  the  period  from  Oct.,  1950 
to  Jan..  Pt56.  .A  corollary  to  the  $1,500,000 
suit  brought  in  1951,  it  was  taken  because 
of  a new  Federal  law  fixing  the  statute  of 
limitations  at  four  years.  The  original  case, 
scheduled  for  trial  in  U.  S.  District  Court 
here  Tan.  16,  was  postponed.  . . . Moe  Bitt- 
man.  partner  in  Dix  drive-in,  Glens  Falls, 
is  one  of  the  proposed  new  Variety  Club 
member^. 

ATLANTA 

President  Arthur  C.  Bromberg,  Allied 
.\rti>ts  .Suuthern  E.xcbanges,  has  returned  to 
his  home  in  Baylou  La  Batre,  Ala.,  after  a 
visit  to  the  local  office.  . . . The  Storey  thea- 
tre has  taken  over  the  Hilan  theatre  from 
its  former  owner,  Mrs.  Kathryn  Murry, 
widow  of  the  late  William  T.  Ahirry.  The 
theatre  has  been  closed  for  about  a year.  . . . 
The  Ro.se  theatre,  Gainesville,  Fla.,  has  been 
fitted  with  a CinemaScope  screen.  . . . A.  B. 
Padgett,  booking  manager,  Wilby-Kincey 
Theatres,  is  in  an  Atlanta  hospital.  . . . V. 
D.  Dumas.  National  .Screen  Service,  also  is 
in  an  Atlanta  hospital  for  an  operation.  . . . 
.A.  B.  Padgett  has  succeeded  John  E.  Branch 
<'U'  president  of  the  north  side  Kiwanis  Club. 
. . . Mrs.  Arthur  C.  Bromberg  is  visiting 
in  Los  Angeles.  . . . Na.sh  Weil,  vice-presi- 
dent, Nil-Kin  Theatre  Supply  Co.,  died  at 
an  Atlanta  hospital.  Service  was  held  in 
Dallas,  Texas.  . . . Oscar  Howell,  president 
of  Capital  City  Supply  Co.,  is  back  at  his 
office  after  a trip  to  Tennessee.  . . . Laura 
Kenny,  United  Artists,  is  a new  grand- 
mother. . . . The  Dale  drive-in,  Tuscaloosa, 
•Ala.,  said  to  be  one  of  the  largest  and  most 
modern  in  the  state,  has  opened. 

BALTIMORE 

Richard  Dizon,  former  manager.  Town 
theatre,  is  now  manager  of  the  Hiway  thea- 
tre in  Essex,  Md.  . . . Motion  Picture  Thea- 
tre Committee  for  the  March  of  Dimes 
includes  Bob  Rappaport,  Town  theatre; 
Rodne\'  Collier,  Stanley;  Leon  Back,  Rome 
Circuit;  Mike  Rendelman,  Berio  Vending; 
Oscar  Kantor.  Warner  Bros. ; Aaron  Seid- 
ler.  New  Albert;  Fred  Schmuff,  Durkee 
Circuit;  Jack  Whittle,  .Avenue;  Sam  Tabor, 
Republic  Pictures.  . . . Frank  Hornig,  Horn 
theatre,  back  from  a Pennsylvania  visit.  . . . 
I lowarrl  Wagonheim,  Scbwaber  circuit, 
readying  a Miami  vacation.  . . . Joe  Grant, 
Northwoorl  theatre  in  Miami,  on  vacation. 
. . . John  Richir,  Hicks-Baker  circuit,  visit- 


ing in  Western  Maryand.  . . . Milt  Harris, 
former  Hippodrome  manager,  is  now  manag- 
ing director  of  the  Cinerama  theatre  in  St. 
Louis.  . . . Huge  turnout,  for  the  induction 
of  the  new  board  of  Tent  No.  11,  included 
many  visitors  from  Washington  and  Film 
Row.  . . . Earl  Lewis  was  inducted  as  new 
chief  barker  by  retiring  chief  barker  Jack 
Whittle.  . . . Stanley  Stern,  Playhouse  man- 
ager, visiting  in  Washington. 

BOSTON 

In  the  realigning  of  district  managership 
duties  in  New  England  Theatres,  Inc.  chain, 
the  three  district  managers,  Hy  Fine,  Bob 
Sternburg  and  Chester  Stoddard  have  made 
some  changes.  Fine__now  heads  the  three 
Boston  theatres,  the  Metropolitan,  Para- 
mount and  Fenway;  two  theatres  in  Dor- 
chester; one  in  Newton  and  one  in  Allston. 
Sternburg  has  the  theatres  in  Connecticut 
and  western  Massachusetts  once  handled  by 
Harry  Browning,  as  well  as  retaining  his 
former  theatres  in  Brockton,  New  Bedford, 
Pawtucket  and  Newport,  R.  I.  Stoddard 
has  added  houses  in  Chelsea,  Dover,  N.  H., 
and  Barre,  Vt.  to  his  regular  district  in 
Bangor,  Westbrook,  Bath  and  Waterville, 
Maine  and  those  in  Lowell  and  Haverhill, 
Mass.  . . . Faith  Bebchick,  daughter  of  Ben- 
jamin Bebchick,  sales  manager  at  Metro, 
will  be  married  in  June  to  S.  Jerome  Zackin 
of  Waterbury,  Conn.  . . . Maurice  “Bucky” 
Harris  is  subbing  at  the  Universal  exchange 
for  i)ublicist  John  McGrail  who  is  recover- 
ing from  a recent  hospitalization. 

BUFFALO 

Billie  Keaton,  past  chief  barker,  Buffalo 
Variety  Club  and  his  wife,  Reggie,  in  one 
week  of  their  return  to  radio  via  WXRA, 
racked  up  contracts  for  24  sponsored  seg- 
ments. . . . Eddie  Balser,  for  35  years  in 
charge  of  the  shipping  department  of  the 
Buffalo  Paramount  Pictures  exchange,  has 
retired  and  has  gone  to  Ann  Arbor,  Mich, 
to  reside.  The  local  branch  staff  threw  a 
farewell  party  for  Ed.  . . . Art  Canton,  east- 
ern district  publicity  representative  for 
MGAI,  busy  lining  up  a lot  of  stunts  for 
Lucille  Ball  and  Desi  Arnaz  when  they 
visit  Buffalo  for  a brief  stay  before  hopping 
via  helicopter  to  Jamestown  Feb.  6 for  a 
two-day  round  of  festivities  in  connection 
with  the  world  premiere  of  “Forever  Dar- 
ling” at  Dipson’s  Palace.  . . . Lewis  J.  Lieser 
has  closed  his  Lieser  Film  Distributing  Co., 
Inc.  office  in  the  Film  Building  at  505  Pearl 
street  and  now,  with  the  assistance  of  Mrs. 
Lieser,  is  conducting  his  business  from  his 
residence  at  13  Campus  Drive.  . . . “Guys 
and  Dolls”  is  doing  excellent  business  in  the 
500-seat  Cinema  at  advanced  prices.  It  now 
is  in  its  fourth  week  and  a long  run  is  in- 
dicated. 

CHARLOTTE 

Although  Charlotte  and  Raleigh  engage- 
ments of  “Guys  and  Dolls”  have  been  less 
profitable  than  others  in  the  nation,  some 
box  office  records  have  been  set.  On  one 


night  at  the  Plaza  theatre,  where  the  film 
is  playing  in  Charlotte,  receipts  were  several 
hundred  dollars  higher  than  for  the  previous 
record  holder.  . . . “All  That  Heaven  Al- 
lows,” playing  one  of  its  first  engagements 
here,  was  good  for  three  weeks  at  the  Manor 
theatre.  . . . “The  Spoilers”  opened  to  good 
business  at  the  Center.  . . . “Hell  on  Frisco 
Bay”  was  good  enough  for  a three-day  hold- 
over at  the  Imperial  theatre  where  it  had 
already  played  for  a week.  . . . Myron  Blank, 
president  of  the  Theatre  Owners  of  Amer- 
ica, will  speak  at  the  annual  convention  of 
the  Theatre  Owners  Association  of  North 
and  South  Carolina  here  Jan.  30.  Herman 
Levy,  TO  A general  counsel,  and  George 
Gaughan,  field  representative,  also  will 
speak. 

CHICAGO 

The  appointment  of  Jack  Botaro  as  head 
booker  and  office  manager  at  Allied  Artists 
offices  here  was  announced  this  week.  Just 
22  years  of  age,  Botaro  is  known  as  the 
youngest,  but  one  of  the  most  efficient  book- 
ers on  Film  Row.  He  started  with  Republic 
Pictures  in  the  16mm.  division  in  1952. 
After  two  and  one-half  years  with  Republic, 
he  joined  Allied  as  a 35mm.  booker.  . . . 
N.  S.  Barger  completed  an  agreement  with 
Alliance  Amusement  Company  to  operate 
the  Parkway,  which  is  located  on  the  city’s 
far  south  side  and  within  a block  of  the 
State,  which  Barger  owns  and  operates.  . . . 
Operations  at  the  Stanley  Warner  Theatres’ 
offices  are  handicapped  by  the  illness  of 
Herb  Wheeler  and  Lorraine  Howaniec.  . . . 
Tom  Dowd,  manager  of  the  Ziegfeld  thea- 
tre, went  to  Minneapolis  on  business.  . . . 
Emil  Montemuro,  of  Movietone  News,  left 
for  Dallas,  Tex.,  to  shoot  film  on  the  opening 
of  the  new  Statler-Hilton.  . . . Sidney  Schatz 
of  the  Park  theatre.  North  Chicago,  Illinois, 
and  Russel  Lamb,  Oregon  theatre,  Oregon, 
Illinois,  were  Film  Row  visitors  during  the 
past  week.  . . . Dave  Williams  is  back  at  his 
post  at  the  Roseland  theatre  following  a 
heart  attack.  . . . P.  W.  Herman  is  new 
owner  and  operator  of  the  Ideal  theatre.  . . . 
Charles  Demos,  manager  of  the  Jeffrey,  will 
be  married  to  Eileen  Greenan  January  21. 
The  couple  will  leave  for  a honeymoon  in 
Florida  immediately  after  the  ceremony. 

CLEVELAND 

Henry  Greenberger  was  reelected  by  ac- 
clamation for  a third  term  as  president  of 
the  Cleveland  Motion  Picture  Exhibitors 
Association  at  the  annual  meeting  held  last 
Tuesday  in  the  association  headquarters. 
Also  reelected  by  acclamation  were;  vice- 
president,  Joe  Rembrandt;  treasurer,  Ted 
Vermes,  and  secretary,  Louis  Weitz.  . . . 
Raymond  Schmertz  who  joined  the  local 
20th-Fox  exchange  19  years  ago  as  assist- 
ant poster  clerk  and  rose  to  become  sales 
manager  of  the  branch,  this  week  w'as  pro- 
moted to  manager  of  the  20th-Fox  branch 
in  Indianapolis.  A testimonial  banquet  in 
honor  of  the  occasion  is  in  the  making.  . . . 
The  local  Allied  Artists  March  of  Progress 

(Continued  on  page  301 


28 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  21.  1956 


NEW  YORK 


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Palms 


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Palace 


“A  REAL  HUMDINGER!  A comparison  with  ‘HIGH  NOON’  is  the  quickest  and  surest 
way  to  give  a fair  indication  of  the  picture's  quality  and  nature!”- >vi.  p.  daily 


THRU 

UA 


Pete  Rufo  Goes  Back  36  Years  Into 
Early  Days  of  Showmanship 

WARREN,  OHIO:  Films  were  still  in  the  “flickers” 
era  when  Peter  “Pete”  Rufo  began  his  theatre  career 
as  an  usher  at  the  old  Duchess  theatre  in  Warren. 
Ohio.  His  career  is  now  in  its  36th  year. 

One  of  the  best  known  and  most  respected  theatre 
men  in  Ohio,  Mr.  Rufo  has  spent  all  of  his  long 
career  with  the  Robins  Theatre  Company  of  Warren. 
He  is  now  manager  of  the  Robins  and  McKinley 
theatres  in  Niles.  Mr.  Rufo  began  his  theatre  work 
on  August  25,  1920  while  still  in  high  school.  Tlie 
Duchess  was  the  first  of  the  theatres  founded  by  the 
late  Dan  and  Ben  Robins.  In  1927  the  Robins  circuit 
was  extended  to  Niles  when  it  acquired  the  Warner, 
which  had  been  operated  by  the  brothers  Warner. 

Mr.  Rufo  and  his  wife  moved  to  Niles  in  1929  and  later  returned  to 
Warren  for  a few  years  before  returning  to  Niles  in  1938.  Pete  is  past 
president  of  the  Niles  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Rotary  Club  of 
Niles.  His  choice  as  the  best  picture  ever  made?  “Gone  With  the  ind,” 
with  “Ben  Hur”  a close  second.  Norma  Shearer  is  his  favorite  among 
the  thousands  of  film  players  whose  images  have  flickered  across  theatres 
in  which  he  has  worked  during  the  past  three  and  a half  decades. 


Peter  Rufo 


{Coiitiiilied  from  page  28) 

Drive  starting  Jan.  25  is  named  in  honor 
of  Sam  Schultz,  branch  manager,  now  cele- 
brating his  20th  anniversary  with  Allied 
Artists  and  its  predecessor,  Monogram  Pic- 
tures. . . . Columbia’s  "Picnic"  has  a Feb.  22 
opening  date  at  the  Hippodrome.  . . . Danny 
Rosenthal.  United  Artists  branch  manager, 
and  !Mrs.  Rosenthal  celebrated  their  21st 
wedding  anniversary  on  Friday  the  13th  of 
Jan.  . . . “Guys  and  Dolls”  is  now  in  its 
fourth  week  at  Loew’s  Ohio.  . . . Henry 
Greenberger,  CM  PEA  president  and  head  of 
the  Community  Circuit,  left  with  his  wife  to 
spend  two  months  in  Florida.  . . . George 
\\’akeley,  Limelite  theatre,  VVoodsville,  was 
in  St.  Charles  Hospital,  Toledo,  for  minor 
surgery.  . . . Paul  Vogel,  Wellsville  theatre 
owner,  goes  back  into  uniform  Feb.  1 for  a 
4-week  stretch  as  instructor  at  the  Fort 
Meade  officers’  staff  school. 

COLUMBUS 

Four  weeks  were  earned  hy  “Guys  and 
Dolls”  at  RKO  Palace  and  “The  African 
Lion”  at  the  World.  . . . Columbus  and 
Franklin  counties  are  among  the  fastest- 
growing  areas  in  the  country,  according  to 
figures  released  by  the  Columbus  Chamber 
of  Commerce.  Present  population  of  Colum- 
bus is  430,755  and  the  county,  including 
metropolitan  Columbus,  is  607,890.  This  rate 
of  growth,  at  14.6  per  cent  for  the  city  and 
21  per  cent  for  the  county  since  the  1950 
census,  bodes  well  for  theatre  business.  . . . 
Norman  Nadel,  Columbus  Citizen  theatre 
editor  couldn’t  limit  himself  to  the  conven- 
tional 10  best  films  of  the  past  year.  His  “10 
best”  list  includes  13  features:  “Marty,” 
“Love  Me  or  Leave  Me,”  “East  of  Eden,” 
“Bad  Day  at  Black  Rock,”  “One  Summer  of 
Happiness,”  “The  Phenix  City  Story,” 
“Romeo  and  Juliet,”  “The  View  from  Pom- 
pey’s  Head,”  “Mister  Roberts,”  “A  Man 
Called  Peter,”  “The  Country  Girl,”  “Black- 


DES  MOINES 

The  Star  theatre  at  Soldier  has  been 
closed  until  further  notice.  . . . The  theatre 
at  Albert  City  has  just  completed  installa- 
tion of  CinemaScope  equipment.  . . . E.  H. 
Luchsinger  has  discontinued  midweek  show- 
ings at  his  Elite  theatre  in  Laurens.  Lack 
of  attendance  was  given  as  the  reason.  . . . 
The  Indian  Theatre  Corp.  of  Des  Moines 
is  being  dissolved.  Its  officers  are  listed  as 
M.  N.  Blank,  president,  and  J.  N.  Blank, 
secretary.  Offices  have  been  in  the  Para- 
mount building.  . . . Joyce  Allen,  18,  of 
Jefferson,  saved  her  fiance  the  price  of  a 
marriage  license  recently — because  she’s  a 
brunette.  Joyce  and  Donald  Kinkeson,  21, 
also  of  Jefferson,  took  advantage  of  the 
Perry  theatre’s  offer  of  a free  marriage 
license  after  the  manager,  Carl  Sch wane- 
beck,  announced  licenses  would  be  on  the 
house  for  a brunette  planning  to  be  married 
in  Dallas  County  during  the  showing  of  the 
film,  “Gentlemen  Marrj'  Brunettes.”  . . . 
Norman  Holt,  Warner  salesman,  is  back  at 
the  job  after  surgery. 

DETROIT 

Clark  Theatre  Service  continues  to  expand 
with  the  addition  of  a drive-in  in  Montpelier, 
Ohio;  the  Sylvan  at  Chelsea,  Apollo  and 
Elliot  in  Detroit.  The  latter  pair  are  now 
under  the  wing  of  Sol  Korman.  . . . The 


Michigan  Manufacturer  published  a piece 
on  renovation  by  Tom  McGuire.  . . . 
Dorothy  Ackerman  will  operate  the  Eastside 
following  the  death  of  husband  Al.  The  Lake 
at  Walled  Lake,  recently  partially  destroyed 
by  fire  was  reopened  by  Bud  Harris  Jan- 
uary 6.  ...  It  was  a near  Christmas  (missed 
hy  two  days)  grandchild  in  the  family  of 
Nellie  Arnold,  National  Screen  Service.  . . . 
Wallace  Hart,  owner  of  the  Bay  theatre  in 
Caseville  has  leased  the  Gem  in  Pigeon  from 
Mrs.  Wesley  Thiel.  . . . Stagehands  of  Local 
38  reelected  Walter  Craig  president.  Also 
reelected  were  Clarence  Apgar,  vice-presi- 
dent; Harry  Pollock,  second  vice-president; 
Frank  Eano,  corresponding  secretary;  War- 
ren Wilson,  secertary-treasurer ; Edgar 
McMillen,  sergeant-at-arms  and  Lester 
Hamilton  and  James  O’Dea,  trustees.  . . . 
James  Riddell,  WXYZ  president,  was  guest 
of  honor  at  a surprise  testimonial  of  the 
Variety  Club.  Riddell  joined  WXYZ  when 
United  Detroit  Theatre  head,  George  Tren- 
dle,  was  the  radio  station’s  president  25 
years  ago. 

HARTFORD 

Bernie  Menschell,  president  of  Bercal 
Theatres,  Inc.,  has  no  intentions  of  resum- 
ing a legitimate  stage  policy  at  the  1,200- 
seat  Parsons  here,  despite  continuing  local 
rumors.  “Business  for  the  holdover  engage- 
ment of  AIGM’s  'Guys  and  Dolls’  has  been 
more  than  gratifying,”  he  says,  “and  we’re 
planning  to  follow  this  delightful  Goldwyn 
musical  with  some  of  the  top  releases  from 
Hollywood  studios.  Our  organization  has 
great  faith  in  the  future  in  the  motion  pic- 
ture industry  and  we  intend  to  display 
our  faith  by  scheduling  filnr  attractions 
as  far  ahead  as  possible.”  . . . Allen  M. 


Widem,  Hartford  Times,  selected  these 
as  Ten  Best  Films  of  1955:  “Guys  and 
Dolls,”  “Not  as  a Stranger,”  “Love  Me 
or  Leave  Me,”  “Summertime,”  “Marty,” 
“Mr.  Roberts,”  “Blackboard  Jungle,”  “To 
Catch  a Thief,”  “Bridges  at  Toko-Ri” 
and  “Seven  Little  Foys.”  . . . George  E. 
Landers,  division  manager,  E.  M.  Loews’ 
Theatres,  has  returned  from  San  Fran- 
cisco and  Los  Angeles.  . . . Theatre 

advertising  rates  are  going  up  at  the  Hart- 
ford Times.  The  afternoon  paper,  which 
boasts  the  largest  daily  circulation  (nearly 
120,000)  in  Connecticut,  will  charge  26  cents 
per  line,  or  $3.64  per  column  inch,  effective 
Feb.  1,  as  compared  to  the  previous  25  cents 
per  line,  or  $3.50  per  column  inch.  The 
paper  attributes  the  hike  to  increase  in 
operating  costs. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

T.  O.  McCleaster,  20th-Fox  central  divi- 
sion manager,  and  Glenn  Norris,  eastern 
sales  manager,  attended  a central  division 
meeting  here  Friday,  along  with  branch 
managers  and  salesmen  from  Pittsburgh, 
Cleveland,  Detroit  and  Cincinnati.  . . . The 
Variety  Club  gave  a cocktail  party  Wednes- 
day to  introduce  Ray  Schmertz,  new  Fox 
Indianapolis  branch  manager.  . . . Sam  Ross, 
formerly  with  RKO  in  Des  Moines,  now  is 
covering  the  northern  Indiana  territory  for 
Allied  Artists.  . . . Joe  Cantor,  Indianapolis 
exhibitor,  has  been  appointed  chairman  of 
the  Multiple  Schlerosis  Drive.  . . . Marc 
Wolf  is  vacationing  for  three  weeks  in 
Hawaii.  . . . Alurray  Devaney,  Columbia 
branch  manager,  has  Ijeen  named  chairman 
of  Variety’s  membership  committee.  . . . 
20th-Fox  will  hold  a CinemaScope  55 

(Continued  on  page  32) 


30 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21,  1956 


the  new  RKO  is  making  NEWS! 


RKO  is  out  in  the  field  pre-selling  its  fine  pictures 
with  an  advanced-type  of  advertising. ..campaigns 
that  use  network  and  independent  TV  and  radio 
in  the  modern  way. ..campaigns  that  make  better 
use  of  magazines/  newspapers  and  exploitation. 


i 


More  than  150  theatres  in 
the  Cincinnati,  Indianapolis 
and  Cleveland  areas  are  feel- 
ing the  impact  of  this  new 
pre-selling  format  during  our 
Bluegrass  Premiere  of  GLORY 
...and  boxoffice  reports  from 
these  dates  are  truly  gratifying, 


DAVID  BUTLER  PRODUCTIONS,  INC. 


Produced  and  Directed  by  DAVID  BUTLER  • Screenplay  by  PETER  MILNE 
From  a story  by  GENE  MARKEY  ‘ 


OiSlntiutedtir 

RKO. 


R K Ofc^ 
RADIOS 

]ii 


(_Contiiiucd  from  page  30) 

demonstration  in  the  Indiana  theatre  Jan.  24. 
. . . New  directors-at-large  elected  by  the 
Allied  Theatre  Owners  board  here  last  week 
are  E.  L.  Ornstein,  Bruce  Kixiniller,  Harold 
Hargis.  Kenneth  Law,  Forrest  Songer,  A1 
Taylor,  Joe  Cantor,  Dr.  M.  Sandorf,  Keith 
Coleman.  Ralph  Fisher  also  was  elected  to 
till  a board  vacancy. 

JACKSONVILLE 

Ted  Chapeau,  Variety’s  chief  barker,  re- 
ported that  the  club  received  $8,665  for  its 
working  participation  in  the  Agricultural 
and  Industrial  Fair  last  November.  . . . P.  J. 
.Sones,  Bay-Fan  Theatres,  Tampa,  returned 
from  a vacation  in  Cuba  and  set  about  plan- 
ning a jaunt  to  Hawaii  in  Februar}’.  . . . 
Bobby  Parrish,  secretary  of  the  Roy  Smith 
Co.,  was  ill  at  her  home  for  a few  days.  . . . 
FST  executives  in  town  to  attend  a series 
of  home  office  conferences  included  J.  L. 
Cartwright,  Daytona  Beach;  Walter  Tre- 
mor. St.  Petersburg;  Frank  Bell,  Tampa, 
and  Harry  Botwick  and  A1  Weiss,  Miami. 
. . . Thomas  P.  Tidwell,  20th-Fox  branch 
manager,  left  for  a company  sales  meeting 
at  the  Dinkier  Plaza  Hotel  in  Atlanta,  ac- 
companied by  his  sales  staff  of  Walter 
Powell,  Bob  Stevens,  Phil  Longdon  and 
Marvin  Skinner.  . . . Col.  John  Crovo,  re- 
tired local  exhibitor,  was  recovering  satis- 
factorily from  an  operation.  . . . \’isiting  dis- 
tributors included  Nat  Levy.  New  York,  and 
Dave  Prince,  Atlanta,  both  of  RKO ; Harold 
Laird.  Republic  branch  manager,  Tampa; 
Jack  Barrett,  Allied  Artists;  Dave  Williams, 
I.F.E.  Releasing  Corp. ; and  Byron  Adams, 
Cnited  Artists,  all  of  Atlanta.  . . . Drive-in 
theatre  patronage  slumped  low  over  the 
state’s  entire  mainland  due  to  the  longest 
cold  wave  in  many  years. 

KANSAS  CITY 

Since  Christmas  shopping  ended,  motion 
picture  houses  have  been  enjoying  good  at- 
tendance. . . . The  Lone  Ranger  in  person 
will  be  at  the  RKO  Missouri  Wednesday, 
February  1.  . . . Miss  Rosalie  Kurash,  of 
the  business  office  of  the  Roxy  theatre,  is 
to  be  married  in  the  near  future  to  Richard 
Kalmar  of  New  York  City.  ...  At  the  Kimo, 
“'The  Deep  Blue  Sea’"  is  in  its  third  week. 

. . . At  the  Vogue,  “The  Adventures  of 
-Sadie”  also  is  in  its  third  week  and  the 
Glen  is  featuring  “Holiday  for  Henrietta” 
for  the  third  week. 

LOS  ANGELES 

Larry  Dopps  has  been  upped  from  assist- 
ant shipper  at  Paramount  Pictures  exchange 
to  the  accounting  office.  . . . Herbert  Rosener, 
president  of  the  Beverly  Canon  Theatre 
Corp.,  flew  in  from  San  Franci.sco  to  confer 
with  board  members  Buddy  Adler  and 
Sydney  Linden  on  policy,  recent  installation 
of  wide-screen  and  CinemaScope,  and  dis- 
cussion of  new  product.  . . . Dorothy  Ingham 
of  the  booking  staff  of  the  Farl  Collins  thea- 
tres in  .San  Francisco,  who  departed  on  a 
motor  trip  to  the  bay  city,  notified  friends 
here  that  she  was  caught  in  the  Northern 
California  flood  waters.  Dorothy  was  un- 
injured, but  her  car  was  damaged  by  the 
raging  torrent.  . . . Off  to  San  Diego  on 
company  business  was  Jack  .Sheriff,  Realart 
salesman.  . . . The  20th  Century-Fox  ex- 
change is  the  proud  possessor  of  a Treasury 
Department  plaque  citing  it  for  attaining 
100  per  cent  quota  in  a Savings  Bond  drive. 


. . . Out  of  town  exhibitors  in  Los  Angeles 
to  buy  and  book  were  Jack  Lowenbein,  San 
Diego;  George  Diamos,  Tri-Delta  Theatres, 
Ariz. ; Harold  Stein,  Sierra  Madre ; and 
Joe  Markowitz,  Encinitas. 

MEMPHIS 

Memphis  is  rounding  out  its  first  month 
without  any  kind  of  movie  censorship  for 
the  first  time  in  27  years.  The  city  has 
a new  administration.  Terms  of  all  censors 
expired.  None  were  re-appointed.  . . . 
Chalmers  Cull  ins,  part  owner  of  three  sub- 
urban theatres  in  Memphis  and  a theatre 
man  all  his  life,  has  been  elected  illustrious 
potentate  of  the  A1  Chymia  Temple  of  the 
Memphis  Shrine.  . . . E.  H.  “Slim”  Arkin, 
manager  of  Warner  theatre,  had  as  his 
guest  to  see  the  film,  “The  Court  Martial 
of  Billy  Mitchell,”  a Tennessee  citizen,  A. 
A.  McGuire,  Dukedom,  Tenn.,  who  served 
with  General  Mitchell.  Mr.  McGuire  came 
to  Memphis  just  to  see  the  film.  . . . The 
Von  theatre,  Hernando,  Miss.,  has  been  sold 
to  Vernon  Adams,  well  known  Memphis 
theatre  man.  . . . Carl  Christian,  owner,  has 
reopened  his  Cozy  theatre  at  Tuckerman, 
Ark.  . . . Fire  destroyed  the  Ken  theatre 
at  Kenton,  Tenn.  owned  by  W.  H.  Gray.  . . 
T.  E.  Smith,  owner,  closed  his  Dixie  thea- 
tre at  Marmaduke,  Ark. 

MIAMI 

Florida  State  Theatres’  .southeastern  divi- 
sion e.xecutives  Harry  Botwick  and  A1 
Weiss  were  up  in  Jacksonville  recently  for 
a district  manager’s  meeting  with  Mr.  Weiss 
stopping  off  in  Palm  Beach  for  conferences 
there.  . . . J.  D.  Woodard  was  in  arranging 
for  the  personal  appearance  at  the  Coral, 
Paramount  and  Sheridan  of  the  Lone 
Ranger  for  the  showing  of  the  feature  of 
tlie  same  name.  ...  At  the  annual  meeting 
of  the  Women’s  Committee  of  Variety  Club. 
Maury  Ashmann,  chief  barker  of  Tent  33 
praised  the  women  for  the  splendid  work 
done  during  1955  when  their  varied  projects 
raised  almost  $54,000,  with  $43,857  going 
to  the  Variety  Children’s  Hospital.  . . . The 
fifth  annual  WTVJ  Cerebral  Palsy  Telethon 
is  slated  for  January  21-22  according  to  Lee 
Ruwitch,  executive  vice-president  and  gen- 
eral manager  of  the  television  station.  Hop- 
ing to  exceed  last  year’s  total  of  $307,000, 
the  goal  has  been  set  at  $400,000.  The  Lin- 
coln on  Miami  Beach  closed  its  doors  after 
20  years  of  Wometco  operation  and  is  now 
undergoing  alterations  for  its  late  January 
opening  under  the  management  of  John 
Calio  for  the  Louis  and  Bernard  Brandt 
interests.  Premiere  feature  will  be  “The 
Rose  Tattoo.” 

MILWAUKEE 

The  Better  Films  Council  of  Milwaukee 
County  held  their  January  meeting  in  the 
Garfield  theatre  where  the  entire  member- 
ship, along  with  the  preview  screening  com- 
mittee, saw  the  screening  of  “All  That 
Heaven  Allows.”  . . . Mrs.  Fred  Rosenkranz, 
president  of  the  Better  Films  Council,  an- 
nounced that  through  the  efforts  of  the 
Council  seven  more  neighborhood  houses 
here  would  have  Saturday  matinee  programs 
for  youngsters  up  to  12  years  old.  A series 
of  11  shows  for  $1  will  begin  in  February. 

. . . Erv  Nowak,  owner  of  the  Port  Outdoor 
theatre  at  Grafton,  Wisconsin,  wishes  to  in- 
form his  friends  in  the  theatre  circle  that 
his  new  winter  occupation  is  selling  Buicks 
for  Lou  Fillers  in  .Shorewood.  . . . Miss 


Estelle  Steinbach,  manager  of  the  Fox-Gar- 
field  theatre,  has  been  appointed  chairman 
of  the  Mother’s  March  of  Dimes  campaign 
of  Milwaukee  County.  She  spoke  before 
various  Wauwatosa  chairmen  at  the  WMu- 
watosa  Village  Hall  last  week.  . . . John 
McKay,  former  manager  of  the  Paradise 
theatre,  is  assistant  booker  to  Mr.  Camillo 
at  the  Fox-Wisconsin  Amusement  office.  . . . 
Boris  Sodos,  former  assistant  manager  at 
the  Palace  theatre,  is  now  manager  of  the 
Fox-Paradise  theatre. 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Ted  Mann,  operator  of  the  World  thea- 
tres in  Minneapolis  and  St.  Paul  and  other 
theatres,  took  over  operation  of  the  Orpheum 
at  Dubuque,  Iowa,  on  Jan.  4.  Mann  pur- 
chased the  theatre  building  several  months 
ago,  but  until  recently  the  house  was  oper- 
ated by  the  RKO  Theatres  circuit.  James 
Hueser  will  continue  as  manager.  . . . The 
United  Artists  exchange  is  undergoing  a 
general  remodeling  to  provide  more  office 
space.  . . . Irving  Joseph,  formerly  assistant 
manager  of  the  Aster,  Minneapolis,  resigned 
to  go  to  Los  Angeles  to  study  film  produc- 
tion. . . . Lyric,  Minneapolis,  and  Riviera, 
St.  Paul,  had  special  shows  for  Friday  the 
13th,  with  many  special  gimmicks.  . . . 
George  Jonckowski  sold  the  Falls  at  River 
Falls,  Wise.,  to  H.  L.  Stoltzman  and  Arthur 
C.  Bean,  who  also  bought  the  Grand  at 
IMohall,  N.  D.  Bean  also  operates  the  River- 
dale  at  Riverdale,  N.  D.  . . . Marilyn  Miller, 
daughter  of  Universal  branch  manager  Le- 
Roy  Miller,  was  married  to  Bill  Diehl,  film 
critic  for  the  St.  Paul  Dispatch  and  Pioneer- 
Press.  . . . Elizabeth  Smith,  former  stenog- 
rapher, is  the  new  cashier  at  Allied  Artists, 
replacing  Jim  Norman,  resigned. 

NEW  ORLEANS 

Women  of  Motion  Picture  Industry 
(W'OMPI’s)  were  to  assist  with  the  collec- 
tion for  “March  of  Dimes”  in  the  lobbies 
of  the  six  in-town  theatres  January  20  and 
Monday,  January  23.  . . . Emile  Savini, 
.\stor  Pictures  Corp.,  New  York,  represen- 
tative, was  in  town  to  confer  with  Milton 
and  Mamie  Dureau  of  Masterpiece,  who 
have  just  taken  over  a portion  of  Astor 
pictures  for  distribution  in  the  New  Orleans 
Film  Exchange  area.  . . . Fern  and  A1 
Randolph  have  converted  their  Joy,  Wood- 
ville.  Miss,  for  CinemaScope  presentations. 
The  sale  and  installation  of  the  large  screen 
and  entire  equipment  was  handled  by  A.  L. 
Johnson  of  Johnson  Theatre  Service.  . . . 
Guy  Brown,  former  exchange  manager  here 
and  for  the  past  10  years  or  so  with  MPA 
in  Atlanta,  was  here  on  a combined  business 
and  pleasure  jaunt. 

PHILADELPHIA 

A substantial  settlement  was  received  by 
both  Jack  Harris  and  Jack  Engel  from 
Filmakers,  whose  next  release  has  been 
taken  away  from  their  independent  Exploita- 
tion Pictures,  Inc.,  exchange  and  given  to 
RKO  for  national  release.  . . . Perry  Lesley 
announced  that  he  is  taking  back  the  Dia- 
mond from  Stanley  Warner  Theatres  after 
15  years  of  their  rental  of  his  house.  Ex- 
tensive improvements  are  contemplated.  . . . 
Angelo  and  Frank  Scave  dropped  their  an- 
nounced plans  for  an  Oak  Hill  drive-in  at 
Moosic,  Pa.,  and  instead  will  build  a new 
1,000-car  drive-in  on  the  Pocono  Highway, 

(Continued  on  page  34) 


32 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21,  1956 


SMASH 


SOLID 


ROOSEVELT 

CHICAGO! 


LOEWS 
COLUMBIA, 
WASH.,  D.  C.! 


SOCK 


TREMENDOUS 


r 12 -THEATRE 
PREMIERE, 
f LOS  ANGELES! 


PARAMOUNT  4 
& FENWAY, 
BOSTON!  1 


POWERHOUSE 


STANLEY, 

PITTSBURGH! 


™ ...and  j 
HEADED  FOR  * 
TOP  BUSINESS 
COAST-TO-  « 
^ COAST/  1 


presents 


QINEmaSoDP^  with  TOMMY  RETTIG  • skip  homeier 

Produced  by  VINCENT  M.  FENNELLY  • Directed  by  ALFRED  WERKER  • Story  and  Screenplay  by  DANIEL  B.  ULLMAN 


DATE  IT  NOW  FROM 

I 


THE  INDUSTRVS  NEW  BOXOFFICE  POWER! 


Watch  Allied  Artists  March  of  Progress  Jan.  28-May  24 


{Continued  from  page  32) 

Route  307,  near  Stroudsburg,  Pa.,  to  be 
ready  by  Spring  with  Tri-State  Buying  and 
Booking  Service  here  handling  the  new 
open-airer.  . . . The  late  Theodore  Cragle’s 
Garden  drive-in,  Hunlock  Creek,  Pa.,  will 
be  operated  by  his  son,  Arthur,  with  Tri- 
State  Buying  and  Booking  Service  here 
handling  it.  . . . An  "admission  by  a can 
of  food"  benefit  was  staged  by  Jack 
Kosharek,  manager  of  the  Olden,  Trenton, 
X.  J.,  for  the  benefit  of  the  \’olunteers  of 
America.  . . . Mr.  and  Mrs.  Marvin  Perskie, 
of  Wildwood,  N.  J.,  in  announcing  the  birth 
of  their  son,  Morton,  stated  that  he  was 
named  for  his  paternal  grandfather,  Morton 
Blumenstock,  vice-president  in  charge  of  ad- 
vertising and  publicity  of  Warner  Brothers 
in  Hollywood.  . . . \’incent  J.  Kostek,  Jr., 
manager  of  Hunt’s  Casino,  Wildwood,  N.  J., 
and  Lillian  Norton,  on  the  service  staff  with 
the  Hunt’s  Theatres,  were  married  last  week. 

PITTSBURGH 

The  Lone  Ranger  will  be  a Pittsburgh 
visitor  on  Feb.  6.  . . . “The  Sheep  Has  Five 
Legs”  still  mopping  up  in  the  Guild  theatre 
after  five  weeks,  with  “Hill  24  Doesn’t 
.Answer”  and  “The  Night  My  Number 
Came  Up”  set  to  follow.  . . . The  Variety 
Club  telethon  for  the  Roselia  Maternity 
Hospital,  with  Post-Gazette  critic  Harold 
Cohen  as  chairman,  netted  an  estimated 
$140,000  for  Tent  Number  One’s  pet  charity. 
. . . Thirty-five  of  Harry  Hendel’s  buddies 
tossed  him  a bon  voyage  dinner  in  Hotel 
Schenley  Park  before  he  took  off  on  a 
round-the-world  trip  as  a gift  from  Allied 
Motion  Picture  Theatre  Operators  of  West- 
ern Pennsylvania  exhibitors.  . . . The  Stan- 
ley has  acquired  RKO’s  “The  Conqueror” 
the  week  of  Feb.  22  for  one  of  that  movie’s 
first  bookings.  . . . Danny  Kaye  will  make 
three  appearances  on  the  Penn  stage  on 
Feb.  3 in  connection  with  his  “Court  Jester” 
movie.  . . . The  Harris  has  added  “The 
Square  Jungle”  to  its  booking  chart.  . . . 
“Pll  Cry  Tomorrow”  will  follow  the  current 
“Man  with  the  Golden  Arm”  in  the  Penn. 
. . . The  Fulton,  which  will  hold  a press 
screening  of  “Carousel”  on  Jan.  31  gets  the 
Rodgers  and  Hammerstein  musical  for  a 
late  February  date. 

PORTLAND 

Jim  Runte,  Evergreen  Chain’s  new  boss, 
was  in  town  for  a few  days  to  confer  with 
Oregon  district  manager  Oscar  Nyberg.  . . . 
F.  B.  Shearer’s  screening  room  is  closed. 
The  Star  and  Paramount  are  the  only  two 
screening  rooms  left  on  Film  Row.  . . . 
“Guys  and  Dolls”  continues  to  do  fabulous 
business  in  the  fourth  week'  at  the  Broad- 
way. . . . “The  Second  Greatest  Sex”  had 
a date  at  Hamrick’s  Liberty  just  before  New 
Year’s.  But  “The  Indian  Fighter”  was 
doing  so  well,  the  date  was  changed  to  a 
week  ago.  Last  week  it  was  changed  a 
second  time  and  finally  opened.  . . . The 
Guild  theatre’s  manager  Marty  Foster  is 
still  in  New  York.  . . . Hollywood  theatre 
manager  Rex  Hopkins  ran  a Friday  the 
13th  spook  show. 

PROVIDENCE 

In  a most  unusual  exploitation  stunt,  at 
least  for  this  city,  the  Majestic  offered  a 
special  one-day  pre-release  preview  of  “The 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts.”  Taking  off  the 
current  attraction,  the  Washington  Street 


house  set  aside  all  day  Saturday  for  the 
presentation.  Seven  screenings  were  given, 
with  the  last  complete  show  starting  at  mid- 
night. Well-advertised,  the  attraction  was 
generously  patronized.  . . . “The  African 
Lion”  which  had  its  Rhode  Island  premiere 
at  the  Avon  Cinema,  held  for  a second  week. 
. . . This  city  may  be  included  in  the  plan 
to  bring  the  live,  professional  theatre  to 
leading  communities  by  the  American  Na- 
tional Theatre  and  Academy  (ANTA),  ac- 
cording to  recent  leports.  Providence,  for 
many  years,  noted  as  an  enthusiastic  “live” 
theatre  town,  is  hungry  for  stage  attractions, 
and  if  the  proposed  plan  materializes,  it 
should  prove  highly  profitable.  . . . Virginia 
Mary  Aiken,  daughter  of  the  Rhode  Island 
correspondent  of  this  publication,  and  Wil- 
liam Albert  Hughes,  United  States  Army, 
exchanged  marriage  vows  at  an  attractive 
ceremony  in  St.  Raymond’s  Church  recently. 
. . . “Artists  and  Models”  held  for  two  weeks 
at  the  Strand,  followed  in  by  “The  Last 
Frontier.”  . . . Midnight  shows  on  both  New 
Year’s  Eve  and  New  Year’s  Day,  at  down- 
town first  runs,  and  a few  neighborhood 
houses,  were,  for  the  most  part,  well  patron- 
ized. New  Year’s  Day,  being  a full  holiday 
in  this  state,  afforded  exhibitors  a double- 
opportunity to  cash  in  on  their  holiday  at- 
tractions. . . . R.  I theatremen  are  laying 
plans  for  their  participation  in  the  ]\Iarch 
of  Dimes  drive. 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

Rotus  Harvey,  Sr.,  Westland  theatres,  is 
chairman  of  the  arrangements  committee 
for  induction  of  Tent  32’s  new  officers  at 
the  Fairmont  Hotel.  A1  Grubstick,  sales 
manager,  Warner  Bros.;  John  Parsons, 
manager.  Telenews  theatre;  Jack  Blumen- 
feld,  booker,  Blumenfeld  theatres ; and 
George  Mitchell,  branch  manager.  Republic 
Picture  Corp.,  and  past  chief  barker,  com- 
plete the  committee.  . . . The  Theatrical  Fed- 
eration of  San  Francisco  elected  George 
Poultney,  Actors  Equity  Association,  pres- 
ident; Phil  Downing,  American  Guild  of 
Variety  Artists,  vice-president;  William  B. 
Sutherland,  Theatrical  Employees.  Local  B- 
18,  secretary-treasurer.  . . . John  Bowles 
will  book  the  August  Pinaro  circuit  in  addi- 
tion to  his  own.  The  former  booker,  Brad 
Fish  has  retired.  . . . The  veteran  exhibitor, 
Verne  Shattuck,  Donner  theatre,  Truckee, 
died  unexpectedly  last  week.  . . . The 
Klamath  theatre,  Klamath,  partially  de- 
stroyed in  the  recent  floods,  will  be  reopened 
by  the  owner,  J.  J.  Perry,  after  a three 
months  reconstruction  project.  . . . “Helen 
of  Troy”  was  to  be  previewed  by  the  city’s 
English  teachers  and  editors  of  high  school 
papers,  Jan.  18.  Hulda  McGinn,  Director 
of  Public  Relations,  California  Theatres 
Assn.,  who  arranged  the  preview,  reports 
that  plans  for  a young  people’s  motion  pic- 
ture council  are  shaping  up. 

ST.  LOUIS 

The  Capitol  theatre  at  Paragould,  Ark., 
recently  gave  a free  cartoon  carnival  and 
all-comedy  show  for  the  children  of  that 
city.  . . . J.  Earl  Hayes,  manager  of  the 
Mainstreet  theatre  at  Lexington,  Mo.,  has 
just  rounded  out  a 45-year  career  in  the 
show  business,  and  has  announced  his  re- 
tirement. He  began  his  professional  career 
as  a piano  player  at  the  Empire  theatre, 
Quincy,  111.,  during  the  days  when  many 
big  names  appeared  on  programs  there.  . . . 


Dick  Bird  of  Regina,  Saskatchewan,  Can- 
ada, who  has  had  a long  and  distinguished 
career  in  the  field  of  motion  picture  produc- 
tion, brought  his  color  nature  movie, 
“Alphabet  of  the  Out-of-Doors,’’  to  the  Cen- 
tral high  school  at  St.  Joseph,  Mo.,  recently. 

. . . The  Corral  drive-in  theatre,  located  be- 
tween Farmington  and  Flat  River,  Missouri, 
announced  in  its  advertisement : “You  re- 
ceive free  gas  every  time  you  attend  the 
show.”.  . . The  Wabash  Railroad  recently 
gave  a free  show  at  the  Grand  theatre, 
Moberly,  Mo.,  for  the  children  and  also  pro- 
vided them  with  gifts.  This  is  an  annual 
affair  by  the  railroad  company. 

TORONTO 

Napoleon  Boucher,  owner  of  the  Royal, 
Hear  St,  Ont.,  was  elected  mayor  of  the  city. 

. . . Famous  Players  Canadian  Corp.  sold 
its  Skyway  drive-in  at  London,  Ont.  for 
an  unreported  price.  The  25-acre  parcel  is 
to  form  part  of  a site  for  a huge  suburban 
shopping  centre,  with  construction  to  begin 
in  the  spring.  . . . Harry  Swartz  was  elected 
president  of  the  Canadian  Picture  Pioneers 
Manitoba-Saskatchewan  branch  in  Winni- 
peg. Other  officers  elected  were  Abe  Fein- 
stein  and  D.  Wolk.  . . . Frank  Vaughan  has 
been  officially  named  general  manager  of 
J.  Arthur  Rank  Film  Distributors  (Can- 
ada) Ltd.  He  succeeded  Frank  H.  Fisher, 
now  vice-president  in  charge  of  theatre 
operations  for  the  Odeon  Theatres  (Canada) 
Ltd.  . . . Gordon  Lightstone,  general  man- 
ager of  Paramount  Film  Service,  will  again 
act  as  chairman  of  the  Motion  Picture  Com- 
mittee of  Support  of  the  Canadian  Council 
of  Christians  and  Jews.  Eugene  Fitzgibbons, 
Famous  Players’  TV  chief,  will  head  the 
TV  committee.  ...  Fire  gutted  the  six-day, 
1,050-seat  Prince  Edward  in  Charlottetown, 
Prince  Edward  Island.  It  is  one  of  the 
city’s  three  houses,  all  operated  by  the  F. 
G.  Spencer  Organization.  Another  house 
destroyed  by  fire  was  the  195-seat,  2-4  day 
Paradise,  Paradise  Valley,  Alta.  . . . Offices 
of  Independent  Theatres  Ltd.  in  Toronto 
were  among  those  damaged  by  fire.  . . . 
Lloyd  H.  Bradley  has  opened  his  new  Lyric 
in  Moosomin,  Sask.,  replacing  the  old  Lyric, 
only  house  in  the  community. 

VANCOUVER 

The  200-seat  theatre  at  Paradise  Valley, 
Alberta,  was  destroyed  by  fire.  . . . Four 
former  Odeon  circuit  managers,  Albert 
Mitchell,  Rod  Fisher,  Tommy  Cook  and 
Denny  Watson,  are  working  for  automobile 
agencies  in  the  Vancouver  area.  . . . Bob 
Fraser,  of  the  Odeon,  West  Vancouver,  is 
at  present  in  charge  of  the  Paradise  in  Van- 
couver, replacing  Arthur  Graburn  who  is 
on  the  sick  list  after  a major  operation.  . . . 
Good  news  for  exhibitors  was  the  rejection 
of  a plea  by  a number  of  Vancouver  Com- 
munity centres  for  a reduction  of  the  $100 
fee  for  social  club  licenses  which  are  re- 
quired for  playing  bingo,  which  is  in  direct 
competition  to  local  theatres.  . . . Wally 
Hopp,  manager  of  the  International-Cinema, 
was  the  winner  of  an  electric  shaver  for 
to])  sales  in  popcorn  in  the  recent  contest. 
Razor  was  donated  by  the  Harlan-Fairbanks. 
B.  C.,  popcorn  distributors.  . . . Sam  Shaw 
resigned  as  assistant  mana.ger  of  the  Studio 
theatre  to  join  a TV  station.  The  replace- 
ment was  Peter  Stanley.  . . . Dave  Borland, 
Dominion  manager,  is  now  in  his  33rd  year 
with  Famous  Players. 


34 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21.  1956 


Tax  Tig  it 
Tirst  Round 
IVash  ington 

WASHINGTON : Motion  picture  theatre 
attendance  and  ;;ross  receipts  were  down 
15.2  per  cent  over  the  country  in  the  last 
quarter  of  1955,  Albert  J.  Sindlinger,  in- 
dustry statistical  analyst,  reported  to  a joint 
House-Senate  committee  holding  hearings 
on  Administation-backed  proposals  to  raise 
revenue  for  the  District  of  Columbia.  One 
of  the  proposals  would  place  a two  per  cent 
tax  on  all  theatre  admissions  in  the  city 
of  Washington. 

This  is  the  first  time  in  nine  years,  he 
said,  the  figure  for  any  quarter  dropped 
so  sharply.  He  also  found  that  theatre  at- 
tendance and  gross  revenues  for  the  last 
quarter  of  1955  in  Washington  dropped  21.7 
per  cent. 

Film  Rentals  Threatened 

His  testimony  followed  that  of  A.  Julian 
Brylawski,  president  of  the  Motion  Picture 
Theatre  Owners  of  Metropolitan  Washing- 
ton, who  opposed  the  tax  as  “the  straw  that 
breaks  the  camel’s  back”  and  who  warned 
that  the  District’s  tax  proposal  was  so 
drafted  that  it  might  apply  to  film  rentals 
in  the  future  as  well  as  to  theatre  ad- 
missions. 

The  tax  was  also  opposed  by  Robert 
Coyne,  speaking  for  the  Council  of  Motion 
Picture  Organizations.  He  said  Congress 
helped  the  industry  out  of  a crucial  financial 
situation  two  years  ago  by  cutting  the  Fed- 
eral admissions  tax,  and  argued  that  ap- 
proval of  the  District  tax  now  would  mean 
a reversal  on  its  part. 

Mr.  Coyne,  IMr.  Brylawski  and  other  in- 
dustry leaders  have  privately  voiced  concern 
over  the  effect  Congressional  approval  of 
a District  admissions  tax  might  have  on 
the  industry’s  coming  campaign  to  win  new 
relief  from  the  Federal  admissions  tax.  They 
have  contended  also  that  if  Congress  were 
to  approve  a local  admissions  tax,  it  would 
be  a signal  for  states  and  municipalities  to 
follow  suit. 

Industry  Struggle  Cited 

Mr.  Brylawski  told  the  committee  the 
56  Washington  theatres  would  willingly  pay 
their  share  of  any  general  increase  in  prop- 
erty or  business  taxes,  but  they  didn’t  wish 
to  be  singled  out  for  any  special  tax,  es- 
pecially since  such  a tax  “would  be  imposed 
on  an  industry  that  is  literally  and  actually 
fighting  for  its  very  survival  at  this  par- 
ticular time.” 

The  District  commissioners  estimated 
that  $500, (X)0  a year  would  be  raised  by  the 
tax  on  motion  picture  theatre  admissions  and 
admissions  to  sports  events,  legitimate  thea- 
tres and  other  entertainment.  IMr.  Brylawski 
claimed  this  revenue  estimate  was  far  too 
high. 


Anslinger  Sees  "Arm/' 

Says  Code  Is  Right 

ITASHINGTON : U.  S.  Narcotics  Com- 
missioner Harry  J.  Anslinger  this  week  re- 
affirmed his  support  of  the  motion  picture 
industr}'  Code’s  ban  on  films  showing  drug 
addiction.  Mr.  Anslinger  last  week  was 
given  a private  showing  of  “The  Man  with 
the  Golden  Arm,”  the  United  .\rtists  film 
recently  denied  a Code  seal,  and  he  also  saw 
a United  Artists  trailer  in  which  producer 
Otto  Preminger  blasts  l\Ir.  .Anslinger  for 
opposing  the  film. 

The  narcotics  chief  would  not  comment 
directly  on  the  film  nor  on  the  trailer.  How- 
ever, he  did  say,  “I  still  think  the  motion 
picture  Code  as  it  now  stands  is  proper.” 
l\Ir.  Anslinger  saw  the  film  at  the  Ontario 
theatre,  where  it  will  open  this  week. 

Officials  of  a Senate  judiciary  subcommit- 
tee studying  juvenile  delinquency  and  of 
another  subcommittee  studying  narcotics  saw 
the  film  last  week,  it  was  learned,  at  the 
Motion  Picture  Association’s  private  theatre, 
the  Academia.  MPAA  officials  said  the 
Congressional  staffs  requested  to  see  the 
film  and  that  MPAA  felt  it  had  to  oblige, 
even  though  the  film  did  not  have  Code  ap- 
proval. 

Government  16mm  Case 
Gets  Final  Judgment 

HOLLYWOOD:  Federal  Judge  Leon  R. 
Yankwich  has  entered  final  judgment  on 
the  16mm  case,  which  was  decided  in  the 
defendants’  favor  in  December.  The  key- 
paragraph  in  the  final  document  reads : “De- 
fendants have  not  contracted,  combined  or 
conspired  among  themselves,  or  with  any- 
alleged  co-conspirators,  or  with  Consent 
Decree  defendants,  or  with  others,  to  violate 
Section  One  of  the  Sherman  Anti-Trust  Act 
or  to  restrain  interstate  trade  and  commerce 
in  16mm  films  in  violation  of  Section  One.” 
The  Government  has  60  days  to  appeal. 


New  Dates  on  Hearings 

n^ASHINGTON : Television  industry  hear- 
ings originally-  scheduled  this  week  before 
the  Senate  Commerce  Committee  have  been 
postponed  until  Jarmary  26  because  of  the 
death  last  weekend  of  Frank  Pellegrini,  gen- 
eral counsel  to  the  committee.  Federal  Com- 
munications Commissioners  will  be  the  first 
witnesses. 


"Demon"  Opens  January  30 

“Golden  Demon.”  produced  in  Eastman 
color  by-  the  Daiei  Motion  Picture  Company, 
which  made  “Gate  of  Hell,”  will  have  its 
-American  premiere  January  30  at  the  Guild 
theatre,  New  York,  it  is  announced  by  Nor- 
man Elsom,  president  of  Guild  Enterprises. 
The  film  was  produced  by  Masaichi  Nagata, 
who  was  responsible  for  “Gate  of  Hell,” 
“Ugetsu”  and  “Rashomon.”  Edward  Harri- 
son is  distributing  the  film  here. 


Susan 

Hayward 

is 

just 

great... 

greater 

than 

ever 

in 

THE 

CONQUEROR 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  21.  1956 


35 


THE  WINNERS  CIRCLE 

Pictures  which  were  reported  as  doing  above  average  business  in  key  cities  of  the 
nation  for  the  week  ended  January  14  were: 


Open  JMetv 

CiwtetttaScnpe 

Cawnpaign 

Twentieth  Century-Fox  is  entering  radio 
in  a big  way — big  enough  for  its  new  me- 
dium. CinemaScope  55,  and  the  giant  effort 
which  first  demonstrates  it,  “Carousel”. 

This  week,  the  company  disclosed,  it  is 
taking  on  full  segmented  sponsorship  of 
radio  programs.  It  has  signed  with  CBS 
Radio,  and  will  employ  such  stars  and  per- 
sonalities as  Bing  Crosby,  Edgar  Bergen, 
Amos  'll’  Andy.  Jack  Carson,  Galen  Drake, 
Peter  Potter,  Mitch  Miller  and  Curt  Massey. 
Picture  companies  until  now  have  used 
radio  for  spot  announcements.  The  new 
move  resembles  the  use  of  television  shows. 

The  first  contract  is  in  effect  February  8. 
With  it  Fox  will  enter  the  eight  entertain- 
ers’ top-rated  programs.  The  audience  is 
estimated  at  116,085,000. 

Charles  Einfeld,  vice-president,  who  heads 
company  advertising  and  promotional  ef- 
forts, said  he  regarded  the  medium  as  an  im- 
portant supplement.  Network  radio,  he  con- 
tinued, should  reach  infrequent  filmgoers. 

Meanwhile,  Thursday  morning  at  the 
Roxy  theatre  in  New  York,  hundreds  of  ex- 
hibitors guests  saw  the  company’s  55mm 
CinemaScope  demonstration  reel;  a reel 
which  shows  scenes  from  “Carousel”  and 
“The  King  and  I”,  has  full  magnetic  stereo- 
phonic sound,  and  which  is  narrated  and 
made  wholly  effective  by  production  chief 
Darryl  F.  Zanuck.  The  reel  also  will  be 
shewn  in  58  other  cities,  and  its  audience 
will  be  300,000,  the  company  predicts. 

Denver  Kar-Vu  Drive-Ins 
Sue  for  First  Run  Bids 

DENVER : The  Denver  Kar-Vu  Theatres, 
operating  the  Monaco  and  Centennial  drive- 
’;ns,  have  filed  suit  in  the  U.S.  District  Court 
asking  that  an  order  be  entered  allowing 
them  to  bid  on  first  run  films  to  be  shown 
in  their  drive-ins.  The  court  has  been  re- 
quested to  ascertain  the  damage  sum.  De- 
fendants are  two  theatre  companies  and 
eight  distributors,  including  Fox  Inter- 
Mountain  Theatres,  Consolidated  Theatres, 
20th  Century-Fox;  Columbia,  Universal, 
Paramount,  RKO,  Loews,  United  Artists 
and  Warner  Bros.  The  plaintiffs  charge 
conspiracy  among  the  defendants  to  deprive 
the  drive-ins  of  their  bidding  rights  and  ask 
a restraining  order  enjoining  the  defendants 
from  carrying  out  the  alleged  conspiracy. 


An  Italian  Firm  is  interested  in  Purchas- 
ing or  Distributing  American  Films. 
Communicate  with: 

ANTHOS  FILM 

Via  Maggi  n.  71 — Livorno — ITALY 


Albany:  All  That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I). 

Atlanta:  The  Big  Tip-Off  (A.A.)  ; Be- 
trayed Women  (A.A.) ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  5th  week;  The  Indian  Fighter 
(U.A.) ; The  Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts 
(20th-Fox). 

Baltimore:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I) ; The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  3rd  week;  The  Lieutenant 
Wore  Skirts  (20th-Fox). 

Boston:  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM);  I Am 
A Camera  (DC A) ; Lease  of  Life 
(IFF);  Naked  Street  (U.A.) ; Rains 
OF  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox). 

Buffalo:  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  4th 
week;  Hell  on  Frisco  Bay  (W.B.) ; The 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts  (20th-Fox) 
2nd  week;  Ransom!  (MGM) ; The  Spoil- 
ers (U-I). 

Chicago:  At  Gunpoint  (A.A.) ; Deep  Blue 
Sea  (20th-Fox)  2nd  week;  Diabolique 
(UMPO)  4th  week;  Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  9th  week;  I’ll  Cry  Tomorrow 
(MGM)  4th  week;  The  Littlest  Out- 
law (B.V.)  4th  week;  The  Man  With 
THE  Golden  Arm  (U.A.)  3rd  week; 
Tarantula  (U-I). 

Cleveland:  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  4th 
week;  There’s  Always  Tomorrow  (U-I). 

Columbus:  The  African  Lion  (B.V.)  3rd 
week;  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  3rd 
week;  The  Last  Frontier  (Col.). 

Denver:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  3rd 
week;  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  3rd 
week;  Kismet  (MGM);  The  Littlest 
Outlaw  (B.V.)  3rd  week;  Rains  of 
Ranchipur  (20th-Fox)  3rd  week;  The 
Spoilers  (U-I). 

Des  Moines:  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  4th 
week. 

Detroit:  All  That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I) ; 
Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  7th  week;  The 
Last  Frontier  (Col.). 

Hartford:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 

(U-I)  2nd  week;  Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  4th  week;  The  Houston  Story 
(Col.)  2nd  week;  Kismet  (MGM);  The 
Spoilers  (U-I). 

Indianapolis:  Glory  (RKO)  ; Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  4th  week;  The  Second 
Greatest  Sex  (U-I). 

Jacksonville:  Hell  on  Frisco  Bay  (W.B.)  ; 
Ranso.m!  (MGM);  The  Second  Great- 
est Sex  (U-I). 

Kansas  City:  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  3rd  week;  The  Indian 
Fighter  (U.A.)  2nd  week;  The  Lieu- 
tenant Wore  Skirts  (20th-Fox)  2nd 
week. 

.Memphis:  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week. 


Miami:  Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  4th  week; 
Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox). 

Milwaukee:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
3rd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  3rd  week;  The  Lieu- 
tenant Wore  Skirts  (20th-Fox). 

Minneapolis:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.) 
2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.) ; Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  3rd  week;  Running  Wild  (U-I) 
and  Tarantula  (U-I)  2nd  week;  The 
Trouble  With  Harry  (Par.)  3rd  week. 

New  Orleans:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I)  3rd  week;  Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  3rd  week;  Kismet  (MGM) ; The 
Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts  (20th-Fox). 

Oklahoma  City:  Artists  and  Models 

(Par.)  4th  week;  Guys  and  Dolls 
(MGM)  4th  week;  Man  With  the  Gun 
(U.A.)  2nd  week;  Queen  Bee  (Col.); 
The  Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox) 
2nd  week;  The  Spoilers  (U-I). 

Philadelphia:  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Kismet 
(MGM)  2nd  week;  The  Rains  of 
Ranchipur  (20th-Fox)  3rd  week. 

Pittsburgh:  The  African  Lion  (B.V.)  4th 
week;  All  That  Heaven  Allows  (U-I) ; 
Sheep  Has  Five  Legs  (UMPO)  5th  week. 

Portland:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.)  3rd 
week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  3rd  week;  'The  Indian 
Fighter  (U.A.)  3rd  week;  Rains  of 
Ranchipur  (20th-Fox)  3rd  week. 

Providence:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I)  2nd  week;  The  African  Lion 
(B.V.)  2nd  week;  The  Court  Martial 
OF  Billy  Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week; 
The  Indian  Fighter  (U.A.)  2nd  week. 

San  Francisco:  All  That  Heaven  Allows 
(U-I)  3rd  week;  The  Court  Martial 
OF  Billy  Mitchell  (W.B.)  4th  week; 
Diabolique  (UMPO)  3rd  week;  Gltys 
AND  Dolls  (MGM)  8th  week;  Man  Who 
Loved  Redheads  (U.A.)  3rd  week; 
Night  My  Number  Came  Up  (Cont. 
Dist.)  4th  week. 

Toronto:  The  Deep  Blue  Sea  (20th-Fox) 
The  Desperate  Hours  (Par.) ; Doctor 
AT  Sea  (JARO)  4th  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  4th  week;  Rebel  With- 
out A Cause  (W.B.). 

Vancouver:  African  Lion  (B.V.)  ; Artists 
AND  Models  (Par.)  3rd  week;  Guys  and 
Dolls  (MGM)  3rd  week;  Rains  of 
Ranchipur  (20th-Fox). 

Washington:  Artists  and  Models  (Par.); 
3rd  week;  The  Court  Martial  of  Billy 
Mitchell  (W.B.)  2nd  week;  Diabolique 
(UMPO) ; Guys  and  Dolls  (MGM)  8th 
week;  The  Indian  Fighter  (U.A.)  2nd 
week;  The  Lieutenant  Wore  Skirts 
(20th-Fox) . 


36 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD.  JANUARY  21.  1956 


'^Conqueror  ” 

I MB  3Manii€B 

HOLLYWOOD:  The  first  of  a series  of 
world-wide  capital  premieres  of  Howard 
Hughes’  “The  Conqueror,”  took  place  in 
Manila,  Philippine  Islands,  this  past  week, 
it  was  announced  by  RKO  Radio  Pictures. 
The  $6,000,000  CinemaScope  production  in 
color  by  Technicolor  stars  John  Wayne  and 
Susan  Hayward.  Other  premieres  of  the 
film  are  scheduled  to  take  place  in  London, 
Paris,  Rome,  Berlin,  Bombay,  Mexico  City, 
Toyko,  Hong  Kong,  Caracas  and  Washing- 
ton, D.  C.,  the  company  has  announced. 
During  the  period  January  23-25,  three 
Latin  American  premieres  will  be  held  at 
Sao  Paulo,  Brazil ; Mexico  City,  Mexico  and 
Caracas,  Venezuela. 

Four  programs  of  the  new  Mutual  Broad- 
casting System  series,  “Soundstage,”  will  be 
interrupted  during  the  next  few  weeks  for 
special  MBS  pickups  of  the  premiere  activi- 
ties at  the  European  capitals.  Ed  Pettitt, 
Mutual  commentator,  will  cover  the  events 
in  Europe. 


Distributors  Sued  by 
Buffalo  Exhibitors 

BUFFALO : The  operators  of  five  com- 
munity theatres  here  have  filed  suit  for  treble 
damages  against  nine  major  distributors, 
asking  $32,100,000.  Filed  in  U.S.  District 
Court,  New  York  by  attorneys  for  Koncza- 
kowski  Theatres,  headed  by  Mieczyslaw  M. 
Konczakowski  and  his  wife,  Marya,  the  suit 
charges  illegal  monopoly  on  the  part  of  the 
defendants  and  alleges  discrimination  by  the 
defendants  in  the  runs  and  clearances  of 
films.  Named  as  defendants  are  Paramount 
Pictures,  Inc.;  Paramount  Pictures  Corpo- 
ration; Paramount  Film  Distributing  Corp. ; 
American  Broadcasting-Paramount  Thea- 
tres, Inc.;  Buffalo  Theatres,  Inc.;  Warner 
Bros.  Pictures,  Inc.  (in  dissolution);  War- 
ner Bros.  Pictures  Distributing  Corp.  (New 
York  and  Delaware)  ; Universal  Pictures 
Co.,  Inc.;  Universal  Film  Exchanges,  Inc.; 
Columbia  Pictures  Corporation;  United 
Artists  Corporation ; Loews’s,  Inc.,  and 
Buffalo  Paramount  Corporation. 


Theatre  Associates,  Inc, 
New  Circuit  Corporation 

Theatre  Associates,  Inc.,  a new  motion 
picture  theatre  corporation  which  will  en- 
gage in  circuit  operations,  has  been  formed 
by  Tom  Connors  of  Tom  Connors  Asso- 
ciates, Max  A.  Cohen,  president  of  Cinema 
Circuit,  New  York,  and  George  Hoover, 
chief  barker  of  International  Variety  Clubs. 
Mr.  Connors  also  said  that  the  corporation’s 
first  theatre,  the  Golden  Glades  Twin  thea- 
tre, will  open  later  this  month  in  North 
Miami,  Fla.  It  will  accommodate  1,350  cars 
and  750  walk-ins. 


Newspaper  Strike  Ends; 
Detroit  Can  Relax 

DETROrr : The  motion  picture  industry 
here  can  breathe  easily  again.  The  city’s  46- 
day  newspaper  strike  was  officially  settled 
at  11  P.M.  January  14.  The  struggle,  which 
began  when  the  stereotypers  walked  out  De- 
cember 1,  involved  seven  other  unions,  in- 
cluding the  printers  and  mailers.  After  these 
agreed  with  the  publishers  on  a formula, 
bargaining  continued  with  other  union  nego- 
tiating teams.  The  last  to  reach  agreement 
were  the  engravers,  the  Detroit  Newspaper 
Guild  and  finally  the  teamsters.  The  Times 
and  News  reappeared  at  noon  Monday,  fol- 
lowed later  in  the  day  by  the  Free  Press. 
Each  paper  was  initially  limited  to  24  pages 
and  carried  theatre  directories  as  their  only 
motion  picture  advertising. 


Rinzier,  Cowan  Honored 

Samuel  Rinzier,  New  York  exhibitor,  and 
Louis  G.  Cowan,  TV  producer,  have  been 
selected  as  recipients  of  the  Federation  of 
Jewish  Philanthropies’  1956  “Mark  of 
Achievements”  Awards  to  be  bestowed  at  a 
luncheon  at  the  Hotel  Sheraton  Astor  Janu- 
ary 31,  Oscar  Hammerstein  II,  awards 
chairman,  and  Harry  Brandt,  luncheon 
chairman,  have  announced.  Additional  re- 
cipients of  “Mark  of  Achievement”  Awards 
will  be  announced  shortly,  according  to  Mr. 
Hammerstein. 


Gross  Gains 
In  Qnarter 
For  Stanley 

Stanley  Warner  Corporation’s  gross  in- 
come for  the  quarter  ending  November  26, 
1955,  was  $23,926,500  as  compared  with 
$23,320,400  for  the  same  quarter  last  year, 
it  was  announced  in  Wilmington,  Delaware, 
by  S.  H.  Fabian,  president.  The  stockholders 
of  the  corporation  held  their  annual  meeting 
in  that  city  last  week. 

“There  was  a decline  of  $299,600  in  oper- 
ating profits  for  this  quarter  as  compared 
with  the  prior  year,”  Mr.  Fabian  said,  “but 
based  on  our  estimated  operating  profit  for 
the  month  of  December,  the  major  portion 
of  such  decrease  has  been  recouped.” 

The  net  profit  after  all  charges  for  the 
quarter  ended  November  26  was  $810,500, 
equivalent  to  37  cents  per  share  on  the  2,- 
194,563  shares  of  common  stock  outstand- 
ing. This  compares  with  a net  profit  for  the 
corresponding  quarter  last  year  of  $1,110,- 
100,  which  was  equivalent  to  50  cents  per 
share  on  the  common  stock  then  outstanding, 
it  was  reported. 

At  the  next  meeting  of  the  board  of  di- 
rectors January  24,  a dividend  of  25  cents 
per  share  is  scheduled  to  be  declared,  pay- 
able on  February  24,  Mr.  Fabian  revealed. 


When  this  man  walks  into  your  theatre... 

...your  service  worries  are  over.  In  thousands  of  theatres  throughout  the 
United  States,  exhibitors  and  projectionists  welcome  the  appearance  of 
an  ALTEC  field  engineer. 

Why? 

Because  ALTEC  SERVICE  is  always  one  step  ahead  of  the  industry’s 
continuing  technical  parade. 

Whether  your  sound  is  optical,  magnetic,  optical-magnetic, 
single  or  multiple  channel,  ALTEC  field  engineers  have  the 
right  answer  for  every  problem. 

Get  in  step  with  ALTEC.  Join  6,000  ALTEC 
customers  in  the  march  to  better  sound. 

SPECIALISTS  IN  MOTION  PICTURE  SOUND 

161  Sixth  Avenue  • New  York  13,  New  York 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21,  1956 


37 


CLASSIFIED  ADVERTISING 


Fifteen  cents  per  word,  money-order  or  check  with  copy.  Count  initials,  box  number  and  address.  Minimum  insertion  $ 1 .50.  Four 
insertions  for  the  price  of  three.  Contract  rates  on  application.  No  border  or  cuts.  Forms  close  Mondays  at  5 P.M.  Publisher 
reserves  the  right  to  reject  any  copy.  Film  and  trailer  advertising  not  accepted.  Classified  advertising  not  subject  to  agency 
commission.  Address  copy  and  checks:  MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  Classified  Dept.,  Rockefeller  Center,  N ew  York  (20) 


HELP  WANTED 


SALESMEN— AGENTS  ]\IAKE  EXTRA  MONEY- 
sell  nationally  advertised  automatic  Sno-Ball  Sno-Cone 
machines  on  easy  terms.  SNO-MASTER  MFG.  CO.. 
124  Hopkins  PI.,  Baltimore  1,  Md. 


MANAGER  — SHOWMAN  EXPERIENCED  IN 
medium-sized  town  operation.  $5200  minimum.  Family 
group  and  hospital  insurance.  North  Central  location. 
Give  full  information  first  letter.  References  not  used 
unless  deal.  BOX  2893,  MOTION  PICTURE 
HERALD. 


WANTED,  TWO  r2)  MANAGERS  FOR  FIRST- 
run  theatres  in  cities  of  medium  size  situated  in 
eastern  part  of  the  states.  Must  be  thoroughly  ex- 
perienced and  definitely  interested  in  exploitation. 
Reply,  giving  full  resume  of  employment,  salary  re- 
quirements, references,  and  availability  for  interview. 
BOX  2894.  MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD. 


DRIVE-IN  THEATRE  MANAGER  WANTED, 
Central  N.  Y.  State  area.  Good  opportunity  for  right 
calibre  man.  State  age,  e.xperience  in  all  phases  of 
management.  Reference  required.  BOX  2897.  MO- 
TION PICTURE  HERALD. 


MANAGER  WANTED  BY  PROGRESSIVE.  IN- 
dependent  Midwest  circuit  oiterating  drive-ins  and 
indoor  theatres.  Good  starting  salary,  excellent  chance 
for  advancement.  Write  giving  full  information  to 
BOX  2895,  MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD. 


MANAGERS  WANTED  FOR  CONVENTIONAL 
and  drive-in  theatres.  Many  benefits  including  retire- 
ment plan.  Apply  WALTER  READE  THEATRES. 
Mayfair  House,  Deal  Rd.,  Oakhurst.  N.  J.  Phone: 
Kellogg  1 - 1600. 


POSITIONS  WANTED 


MANAGER-CAPABLE,  EXPERIENCED,  FAM- 
ily  man,  age  38.  Now  assistant  general  manager  small 
circuit.  Consider  anywhere.  Pleasant  working  condi- 
tions. Prefer  South.  BOX  2892,  MOTION  PICTURE 
HERALD. 


CITY  .MANAGER,  CAPABLE  SUPERVISION. 
Now  employed.  Wishes  change.  Good  references.  BOX 
2896,  MOTIO.N  PICTURE  HER/\LD. 


STUDIO  EQUIPMENT 


MITCHELL  16  CAMERA,  3 BALTAR  LENSES, 
2 magazines,  complete  $2995;  10'  Title  Animation 

Stand,  motorized  zoom,  stopmotion,  $2500  value, 
$975.00  Bardwell  McAlister  studio  floodlites,  3 heads 
on  rolling  stand  hold  12  bulbs,  $180  value,  $29.50; 
Quadlite  Heads  only,  $4.95;  Stands  only  $19.95; 
Neumade  editing  tables  with  worklight,  $58.00  value, 
$33.95;  Moviola  35mra  composite  sound/picture,  $495.00; 
Microrecord  16/3Smm  Automatic  Processing  Outfits, 
demonstrators,  $136.95.  S.  O.  S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY 
CORPORATION,  602  W.  52nd  Street,  New  York  19. 


NEW  EQUIPMENT 


BARGAINS  GALORE  — HOLMES  PARTS!  CON- 
denser  lenses,  95c;  constant  speed  motors  $12.50; 
shutter  shafts  $1.25;  sound  optical  lenses  $9.95;  inter- 
mittent $24.50;  Star-Sprocket  assembly  $10;  EE-14070 
Vertical  Drive  Shaft  w/5  gears,  bearings  $9.75; 
lOOOW  T-20C-13  Mogul  prefocus  Lamps  $25  dozen 
($3.95  each).  S.  O.  S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY  CORP., 
602  W.  52nd  St.,  New  York  19. 


BEST  CINEMASCOPE  BUY!  CINEMATIC  IV 
adjustable  anamorphics  $375  pr.  Metallic  seamless 
screens  75c  sq.  ft.  Buy  on  time.  S.O.S.  CINEMA 
SUPPLY  CORP.,  602  W.  52nd  St.,  New  York  19. 


PREPARE  FOR  “KISMET.”  LOWEST  PRICES, 
prompt  deliveries  on  Foxhole  Sprockets  for  Standard 
& Super  Simplex,  E-7,  X-L,  Century  Projectors;  also 
most  soundheads  including  RCA  PS24,  MI  1040,  1050, 
1060,  9030,  9050;  W.E.  206,  208,  TA  7400;  Simplex  4 
Star  and  Ballantyne.  S.  O.  S.  CINEMA  SUPPLY 
CORPORATION,  602  W.  52nd  Street,  New  York  19. 


USED  EQUIPMENT 


EXCELLENT  COATED  PROJECTION  LENSES— 
many  brand  new!  Wollensak  “Sunray”  Series  I:  2", 
3",  Z'A”,  3)4",  5",  554",  S'A",  6",  7)4"  $35.00  pair. 
Super  Snaplite  fi.  9— 2"-254"  $17(1.00  pr.;  Superlite 
254"-3"-354"  $150.00  pr. ; Superlite  354"  $90.00  pr. 
Trades  Taken.  Wire  or  telephone  order  today.  S.  O.  S. 
CINEMA  SUPPLY  CORPORATION,  602  W.  52nd 
Street,  New  York  19. 


PAIR  DEVRY  12,000  PROJECTORS,  70  AMPERE 
lamphouses,  rectifiers,  etc.,  excellent,  $1,495;  E7 
mechanisms,  excellent,  $475  pair;  Magnarc  lamphouses, 
late  type  $475  pair;  Strong  Ikw  lamphouses  and  recti- 
fiers $475  complete;  bargains  on  new  and  used  lenses. 
What  do  you  need?  STAR  QNEMA  SUPPLY.  621 
W.  55th  St.,  New  York  19. 


A REAL  VALUE:  OUR  ENTIRE  THEATRE 
equipment  listed  below  which  is  in  perfect  condition, 
been  well  cared  for,  and  used  only  six  hours  per  week. 
Still  intact  and  will  sell  as  is  for  $2,000  cash.  One 
RCA  .Sound  system  PG-139BX;  'Two  Brenkert 
Mechanisms  BX-80;  'Two  Brenkert  Upper  Magazines 
BX-21;  Two  Brenkert  Lower  Magazines  BX-22;  Two 
Brenkert  Footswitches  BX-20;  Two  Brenkert  Cliange- 
overs  BX-30;  Two  Brenkert  1 kw  I^amps  N-lOO;  Two 
Brenkert  Floor  Bases  BX-8;  Two  Baldor  Rectifiers 
45-T.  JOE  BRADLEY  SCHOOL.  Huntsville.  Ala. 


WANTED  TO  BUY 


WANTED  — ILLUSTRATED  SONG  SLIDES. 
Collector  wants  early  pop.,  comic,  sentimental  titles. 
Will  buy  small  or  large  lots.  JOHN  RIPLEY,  2400 
Crestview,  Topeka,  Kans. 


THEATRES 


NO  TELEVISION,  TOWN  10.000  PEOPLE.  MOD 
ern.  CinemaScope,  building,  equipment,  netting  $22,000. 
Will  pay  out  four  years.  $50,000  down.  Brochure. 
P.  McADAM,  Livingston,  Mont. 


FOR  SALE:  NICE  CLEAN  400-SEAT  THEATRE. 
Good  opportunity  and  priced  right.  Write  CREST 
THEATRE,  Wellington,  Kans. 


DRIVE-IN  THEATRE  FOR  SALE  IN  GREATER 
Hartford  market.  The  Pike  Drive-In  Theatre  serves 
the  Greater  Hartford  area,  the  country’s  best  market 
year  after  year.  The  theatre  is  located  in  Newington 
on  the  busy  Berling  Turnpike.  It  has  made  money 
every  year  since  it  was  established  in  1948,  has  a 750- 
car  capacity,  and  u'ost  modern  equipment  including 
CinemaScope  screen  104  by  44.  Profitable  concession 
stand  too.  Bids  accepted  until  February  15,  1956.  For 
full  details  contact  or  write  MICHAEL  R.ADIN,  At- 
torney, 11  Asylum  St.,  Hartford.  Conn. 


POPCORN 

WORLD-WIDE  HEADQUARTERS 

FOR  POP- 

corn,  popcorn  equipment  and  supplies. 
VILLAGE,  Nashville.  Tenn..  U.S.A. 

POPCORN 

BOOKS 

RICHARDSON’S  BLUEBOOK  OF  PROJECTTION. 
New  8th  Edition.  Revised  to  deal  with  the  latest  tech- 
nical developments  in  motion  picture  projection  and 
sound,  and  reorganized  to  facilitate  study  and  refer- 
ence. Includes  a practical  discussion  of  Television 
especially  prepared  for  the  instruction  of  theatre  pro- 
jectionists, and  of  new  techniques  for  advancement  of 
the  art  of  the  motion  picture.  The  standard  textbook 
on  motion  picture  projection  and  sound  reproduction. 
Invaluable  to  beginner  and  expert.  Best  seller  since 
1911.  662  pages,  cloth  bound.  $7.25  postpaid.  QUIGLEY 
BOOKSHOP,  1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New  York  20,  N.  Y. 


NEW  — FOR  THEATRE  MAN.AGERS  — “THE 
Master  Guide  to  Tlieatre  Maintenance,”  compiled  from 
authorities,  handy  for  reference  with  hard  covers  and 
index.  Chapters  on  maintenance  of  building  and 
furnishings,  on  air  conditioning,  projection,  sound,  ex- 
ploitation devices,  all  written  in  non-technical  language 
especially  for  theatre  owners,  managers  and  staffs. 
Indexed  for  ready  reference.  Send  $5.00  today  to 
QUIGLEY  BOOKSHOP.  1270  .Sixth  Avenue.  New 
York  20,  N.  V. 


MOTION  PICTURE  ALMANAC  — the  big  book 
about  your  business— 1956  edition.  Contains  over  12,000 
biographies  of  important  motion  picture  personalities. 
•Also  all  industry  statistics.  Complete  listings  of  feature 
pictures  1944  to  date.  Order  your  copy  today.  $5.00, 
posta.ge  included.  Send  remittance  to  QUIGLEY 
BOOKSHOP,  1270  Sixth  Avenue,  New  York  20,  N.  Y. 


Hal  Wallis  Touring 

Hal  Wallis,  piattlucer  of  “The  Rose  Tat- 
too,” began  a jiromotion  tour  this  week  on 
behalf  of  the  picture.  Among  the  cities  he 
will  visit  are  Philadelphia,  Washington, 
Boston,  Cleveland,  Detroit  and  Chicago. 
On  the  tour,  he  will  discuss  during  inter- 
views the  making  of  the  picture,  which  stars 
Anna  Magnani  and  Burt  Lancaster.  The  film 
was  tlirected  by  Daniel  Mann. 

Mrs.  Marie  McMahon 

PHILADELPHIA : Mrs.  Marie  Pachin 

McMahon,  86,  one  of  the  first  operators  of  a 


neighborhood  motion  picture  theatre  here, 
died  January  8.  .She  and  her  husband,  the 
late  John  F.  McMahon,  started  in  the  mo- 
tion picture  business  at  the  turn  of  the 
century  in  the  Maiiyunk  section  of  the  Penn- 
sylvania city. 


Mrs.  Nelson  Ward 

LEXINGTON,  KY.:  Mrs.  Nelson  E.  Ward, 
secretary-treasurer  of  the  Nelson  Theatre 
Circuit,  died  here  January  7.  She  was  active 
in  civic  and  cultural  groups  and  had  written 
several  books.  Her  sister-in-law,  Mrs.  Anna 
Bell  Ward,  also  has  an  interest  in  the  Nelson 
circuit. 


Stamp  Collectors  Elect 

Jack  Levy  of  National  Screen  Service 
was  elected  president  of  the  Cinema  Stamp 
Collectors  for  1956  at  a meeting  recently  in 
New  York.  Retiring  president  Leon  J. 
Bamberger  of  RKO  Radio  becomes  chair- 
man of  the  executive  committee,  which  in 
addition  to  Mr.  Levy  will  include  the  fol- 
lowing: Milton  Zucker,  first  vice-president; 
Sidiiey  Weiner,  second  vice-president:  Sey- 
mour Glassner,  third  vice-president;  James 
Harvey,  recording  secretary ; Bert  N. 
Obrentz,  corresponding  secretary ; Elias 
Sandberg,  treasurer ; Jack  Hoffberg  and  Dr. 
Elliot  Lawrence.  The  club  meets  at  the 
Hotel  Astor  twice  a month. 


38 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21,  1956 


An  International  Association  of  Motion  Picture  Showmen — Walter  Brooks,  Director 


■ •/. 


SOMEDAY,  we'd  like  to  bestow  an 
“Oscar”  on  somebody  who  would  come 
up  with  an  absolutely  new  and  original 
showmanship  idea  that  had  never  been  used 
before.  It  isn’t  in  the  cards,  for  most  of 
the  basic  ideas  for  exploitation  and  promo- 
tion date  back  to  Phineas  T.  Barnum,  patron 
saint  of  show  business,  through  these  many 
years.  In  the  1870’s,  he  was  doing  the  same 
things  that  are  considered  “new”  today, — 
depending  on  when  you  used  them  last. 

We  are  reminded  of  this  because  of  an 
added  note  in  Kyle  Rorex’s  release  on  Texas 
Compo’s  exploitation  package  plans  for  1956, 
one  every  quarter  through  the  year.  Texas 
Compo  prepares  an  excellent  “package”  of 
promotion  accessories,  and  these  are  copy- 
righted, but  the  ideas  are  in  the  public  do- 
main, for  whoever  wants  to  use  them  any 
time.  Texas  Compo  has  been  very  successful 
with  the  “Oscar  Race” — but  anybody  can 
have  a local  contest  to  guess  the  winners  of 
the  annual  Academy  Awards,  and  it  has  been 
done  over  and  over  again,  in  all  parts  of  the 
country.  The  title  “Academy  Awards”  and 
the  design  of  the  figure  is  protected,  and  the 
word  “Oscar”  was  a nickname — embedded 
in  history  by  Terry  Ramsaye. 

Similarly,  anybody  can  hold  a contest  to 
select  “The  Teacher  of  the  Year” — and  it 
miglit  be  the  prize  student,  the  best  business 
girl,  or  even  the  most  beautiful  baby — but 
it  is  always  a popularity  contest,  and  you 
need  pay  copyright  fees  only  for  materials 
that  have  been  prepared,  which  Texas 
Compo  sells  for  practically  cost,  to  encour- 
age use.  Or,  the  Manager’s  Award  for  a 
picture  Ijearing  his  personal  endorsement.  Of 
course,  the  personal  recommendation  by  a 
manager,  over  his  signature,  and  for  opinion 
makers,  and  press  or  publicity  purposes  at 
the  local  level,  is  as  old  as  any  showmanship 
idea  we  can  think  of,  offhand.  But  if  you 
wish,  you  can  buy  Texas  Compo’s  package 
of  exploitation  material — and  get  trailers, 
40x60  displays,  composite  mats,  and  radio, 
TV  and  newspaper  publicity. 

We  think  this  should  be  pointed  out,  be- 
cause there  are  some  who  would  believe  that 
the  package  cost  was  a hindrance  in  their 
way — when  in  fact,  it  is  a benefit,  and  a help 
for  every  showman  worthy  of  the  name. 


THEY  DON'T  REMEMBER! 

Stan  Brown,  who  does  constructive  re- 
search tor  National  Theatres  to  supply 
needed  information  towards  better  business 
at  the  box  office,  has  recently  conducted 
a poll  among  500  families  who  are  cus- 
tomers of  Fox  Wisconsin  Theatres  in  Mil- 
waukee. Most  surprising  was  the  fact  that 
25%  of  the  adults  couldn't  remember  the 
last  time  they  had  attended  a movie,  and 
a very  small  percentage  could  recall  the 
name  of  any  one  particular  picture! 

That's  astonishing,  but  we're  afraid  it's 
more  general  than  merely  local  evidence, 
where  we  happen  to  find  the  figures  as  a 
matter  of  record.  Goes  to  show  how  im- 
portant it  is  to  dig  for  facts  such  as  these, 
and  make  corresponding  plans  to  combat 
a condition  before  it  becomes  more 
prevalent.  An  average  viewer  may  see 
four  or  five  movies  per  day  on  television, 
so  the  odds  are  against  us. 

The  poll  indicated  that  teen-agers  are 
frequent  movie  goers  but  in  total  numbers, 
adults  make  up  the  major  market.  Adults 
prefer  neighborhood  houses  to  downtown 
theatres,  because  of  lower  prices  and  more 
convenience.  Difficulty  in  finding  baby 
sitters  was  paired  with  television  as  our 
most  serious  problem  in  getting  attendance 
for  theatres.  To  which  we  add — parking. 

More  than  56%  had  never  attended  a 
drive-in  theatre;  31%  thought  movies  were 
better  than  last  year;  two-thirds  of  adults 
interviewed  preferred  CinemaScope,  while 
80%  preferred  "color."  You  can  learn  a 
lot  when  you  start  asking  questions. 


Sometimes  we  think  that  when  ideas  are 
free,  for  the  taking,  they  are  less  appreciated 
than  when  you  pay  for  them.  Every  week 
in  the  Round  Table,  through  260  pages  of 
pure  showmanship  per  year,  there  are  ideas 
which  are  only  subject  to  your  personal  vari- 
ation in  plan,  for  purely  local  reasons,  best 
known  to  yourself.  A good  showman  gets 
<^he  idea  quickly. 


q LEONARD  GOLDENSON,  p%ident 
of  American  Broadcasting-Paramount 
tres,  who  knows  what  he  is  talking  about, 
says  we  can  lick  our  problems  of  new  com- 
petition, and  points  out  particularly  “that 
complaining  alone  will  not  do  the  trick.” 
And  since  he  has  a good  view  on  both  sides 
of  the  fence,  as  head  of  the  largest  circuit  of 
theatres  in  the  country,  and  one  of  the 
largest  networks,  we  should  pay  careful  at- 
tention. He  proves  conclusively  that  we  are 
all  in  the  same  business,  with  the  allied  arts 
of  theatre,  together,  and  it  pays  to  “jii^ ’em” 
rather  than  “fight  ’em.”  What  Mr.  Golden-' 
son  and  his  affiliates  have  done  on  a big 
scale,  you  can  do  on  a local  scale.  There  are 
hundreds  of  towns  where  tomorrow's  tele- 
vision is  today's  theatre  operation — in  man 
power,  in  management,  in  money.  Inciden- 
tally, AB-Paramount  are  now  credited  with 
the  ownership  or  control  of  639  theatres,  in 
the  new  edition  of  Motion  Picture  Almanac, 
including  all  types  of  operation  throughout 
the  country. 

^ W.  S.  QUINN,  manager  of  the  Victoria 
theatre,  Tweed,  Ontario,  writes  to  Harland 
Rankin  to  congratulate  him  on  getting  back 
into  print  with  his  pertinent  comments  on 
“What  the  Picture  Did  For  Me'’ — and  asks 
a question  of  more  than  passing  interest.  He 
wants  to  know  what  to  do  in  the  face  of 
on-coming  television,  and  we’d  say,  just 
what  you  would  do  under  any  other  flood 
conditions.  Repair  your  showmanship  levees ; 
fortify  your  community  relations  with  more 
skill ; make  sure  you  stormproof  the  cellar 
where  you  store  your  old  exploitation  tricks : 
inspect  your  services  and  comforts  so  that 
the  theatre  in  your  town  is  up  to  standards 
that  are  new  in  these  days  of  transition — or, 
take  to  the  tall  timber  ! There  is  no  happy 
solution  to  this  problem,  no  panacea  for  pale 
promotion,  nor  any  catholicon  that  is  guar- 
anteed to  cure  all  complaints  of  this  nature. 
But  we  urge  Stan  to  read  the  trade  press, 
follow  the  Round  Table  for  news  of  others 
with  similar  problems,  and  dig  in  for  a hard 
fight  against  new  competition.  When  the 
first  novelty  has  worn  off,  you’ll  find  your 
loyal  patrons  still  with  you.— Walter  Brooks 


MANAGERS'  ROUND  TABLE  SECTION.  JANUARY  21.  1956 


39 


o 


EWORLD  PMMlIRi: 

tJNr'.^KSM  IN?- UN'-  V ^ 

^ ROSS  HUNTER'S 

Hifil ! ALWAYS 
TOMOPOW' 

■ K ^ ^ ^ 

FudLSSS  Jotwr^" 


8wfefi!!ir“  FudLsSS  Jotwr^" 

STANWYCK  MkMURRAY  BENNETT 


. Tstmmmxsit'e.mmm]si;!iimiBBn.m 

...  mo! I/yi’StfTm.vRXKmHJKD' 


WEDNESDAY  JAN.ni! 


Alice  Gorham,  Quigley  Grand  Award  winner  and  director 
of  ticket  sales  for  United  Detroit  Theatres,  with  Columbia's 
field  exploiteer,  Horace  McNab,  put  together  this  spectacular 
display  for  "The  Last  Frontier"  with  all  materials  donated  by 
the  North  American  Indian  Club. 


Howard  Higley,  manager  of  the  Allen  theatre,  Cleveland,  poses 
with  Helen  Rose,  well-known  marriage  counsellor  and  psychologist, 
with  the  display  for  the  world  premiere  of  Universal-International's 
"There's  Always  Tomorrow." 


John  J.  Corbett,  manager  of  the  Glove  theatre,  Gloversville,  N.  Y„  on  stage 
at  left,  with  contenders  in  his  "Models'  Contest  and  Fashion  Presentation" 
which  ran  for  four  weeks,  with  great  success,  as  an  attraction. 


William  J.  Moclair,  managing  director  of  the 
Fox  theatre,  Philadelphia,  presents  a $100  check 
to  the  prize  winner  in  his  promotion  contest  for 
"The  Deep  Blue  Sea." 


Mel  Jolley,  manager  of  the  Century  theatre,  Hamilton, 
Ontario,  second  from  the  left,  with  the  members  of  his 
Shriners'  Club,  and  the  gifts  they  provided  in  a "Toys  for 
Tots"  campaign. 


Russ  McKibbon,  manager  of  the  Imperial  theatre,  Toronto, 
had  a girl  artist  sketching  16  models  in  relays,  as  a window 
display  to  attract  attention  for  "Artists  and  Models"  in  a 
men's-wear  store. 


40 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21,  1956 


One  of  a Series  of  Campaign  Catalogs 


Jim  Cameron 


Selling  Goodman 

With  ‘‘Charm’’ 


“The  Benny  Goodman  Story” — that  is, 
Universal-International’s  newest  musical 
biography,  with  the  benefit  of  the  excellent 
merchandising  and  advertising  tieup  which 
has  been  made  in  the  February  issue  of 
“Charm”  magazine,  now  on  the  stands. 
Eleven  manufacturers  of  ladies’  fashions 
have  joined  to  create  a nine-page  section 
in  the  magazine,  aimed  at  girls  in  the  21  to 
35  j’^ear  age  bracket,  who  “go  to  business” 
and  dress  for  it. 

The  promotion  is  divided  into  two  parts. 
First  the  fashion  idea,  delivered  in  800,000 
copies  of  the  magazine  and  carried  out  by 
participating  stores  everywhere.  An  exami- 
nation of  the  nine-page  advertising  insert 
will  show  you  how  effectively  these  manu- 
facturers have  attracted  the  audience  they 
want — and  their  men  folks,  also.  “The  Benny 
Goodman  Story”  is  well  known  to  the  old- 
sters, but  this  is  attraction-value  for  the 
younger  group.  You  will  find  many  mer- 
chandising tieups  with  prizes  at  the  local 
level,  in  addition  to  all  that  has  been  offered 
on  a national  basis. 

More  of  Those  Sponsored 
Airline  Trips  to  Rome 

The  second  part  of  the  promotion  is  a big 
contest,  to  identify  Benny  Goodman  selec- 
tions and  win  free  trips  to  Rome,  via  KLM 
Royal  Dutch  Airlines.  We’ve  seen  some 
great  success  with  this  sort  of  contest,  and  it 
appeals  to  the  business  girls,  who  want  to 
travel  and  see  the  world.  The  final  deadline 
for  the  national  contest  is  April  15,  1956, 
and  local  entries  should  be  sent  to  “Song 
Symbol”  contest  in  care  of  Universal,  in 
New  York.  The  idea  is  to  stage  a local 
contest  for  local  prizes  and  send  in  your 
winners  as  contenders  for  the  free  trip  to 
Rome.  Local  merchants  participating  will 
be  glad  to  cooperate  in  making  this  possible 
at  your  level. 

In  sixty-three  key-city  and  first-run  situa- 
tions, local  stores  have  agreed  to  place  half- 
page ads  in  their  contract  newspaper  space, 
in  a tieup  with  theatre  playdates.  This  will 
be  augmented  by  many  others  who  will  make 
similar  agreements  as  exhibition  contracts 
are  signed  for  the  picture.  Besides  this,  there 
will  be  window  displays  and  interior  store 
displays  of  merchandise  which  is  covered  in 
the  “Charm”  section.  All  of  this  has  the 
benefit  of  national  planning,  brought  down 
to  local  stores,  to  meet  your  effort  as  you 
go  to  work  on  your  own  Main  Street.  Ex- 
hibitor-retailer aids  may  also  be  obtained 
directly  from  Universal’s  exploitation  de- 
partment in  New  York,  and  these  include  a 
special  one-sheet  and  other  display  materials, 
obtained  from  national  sponsors  for  theatre 


use.  An  examination  of  the  “Charm”  section 
or  the  prepared  lists  of  cooperative  adver- 
tisers will  show  you  which  way  to  turn  as 
you  go  your  rounds. 

The  picture  will  have  its  World  Premiere 
at  the  Chicago  theatre,  in  Chicago,  on  Feb- 
ruary 2nd  and  will  be  followed  immediately 
by  a series  of  75  openings  for  the  Lincoln’s 
Birthday  holiday,  using  the  pattern  of  the 
successful  launching  of  “The  Glenn  Miller 
Story”  two  years  ago.  In  these  follow-up 
premieres,  all  the  major  circuit  areas  will 
be  included.  Charles  Simonelli,  eastern  ad- 
vertising and  publicity  department  manager, 
says  “The  Benny  Goodman  Story”  will  be 
backed  by  the  most  comprehensive  advance 
promotional  campaign  in  the  history  of  Uni- 
versal, and  is  one  of  the  most  important  films 
in  the  44-year  record  of  the  company. 


Ten  Year  Newspaper  Tieup 

Hugh  J.  Campbell,  manager  of  the  Central 
theatre.  West  Hartford,  Conn.,  has  for  ten 
years  carried  on  a successful  weekly  news- 
paper tieup.  Names  of  local  residents  are 
taken  from  the  phone  book  at  random  and 
scattered  in  the  local  paper  with  guest  tickets 
to  the  lucky  ones. 


Starts  Teen 
Age  Council 

TORONTO : James  Cameron,  Famous 

Players  theatre  supervisor  in  Fort  William, 
combined  showmanship  with  good  citizen- 
ship when  he  set  up  “The  Famous  Players 
Teeners’  Advisory  Council”  in  that  city. 

The  Daily  Times-Journal  of  Fort  Wil- 
liam, in  a recent  editorial,  threw  its  support 
behind  the  plan,  said  the  plan  was  being 
used  to  combat  juvenile  misbehavior  and 
possible  delinquency. 

Jim  works  as  counsellor  to  a representa- 
tive group  of  about  25  Fort  William  teen- 
ers who  have  banded  together  to  thrash  out 
their  problems  among  themselves.  For  the 
most  part,  the  teeners  are  those  who  have 
shown  leadership  qualities. 

The  newspaper,  in  its  editorial,  said  the 
theory  of  the  plan  was  “to  devise  means  of 
letting  the  older  generation  know  their  prob- 
lems and  their  thinking,  so  that  a fuller 
understanding  between  age  groups  can  be 
developed.  In  the  fellowship  and  discussion 
developing  at  the  meetings  the  teeners  are 
expected  to  find  inspiration  and  a broader 
outlook,  thus  developing  a deeper  apprecia- 
tion for  what  is  being  done  for  them  today.” 


Tony  Masella,  manager  of  Loew’s  Poli- 
Palace  theatre,  Meriden,  got  two  newspaper 
pages  in  his  “First  Baby  Contest  for  1956” 
breaking  in  both  the  Record  and  Journal, 
with  the  cooperation  of  local  advertisers. 


Billie  Sanders  (she's  the  center  of  interest  in  this  group),  manager  of  Sanders,  Inc., 
department  store  in  Kalamazoo.  Mich.,  visiting  New  York,  discusses  Universal-Interna- 
tional's Charm  Magazine  merchandise  promotion  on  "The  Benny  Goodman  Story"  with 
home  office  advertising  executives.  Deft  to  right)  Jerome  M.  Evans,  in  charge  of  promo- 
tion; Herman  Kass,  eastern  exploitation  manager,  and  Charles  Simonelli,  eastern  adver- 
tising and  publicity  director,  Sanders,  Inc.,  is  one  of  many  participating  stores,  and  that's 
Benny  Goodman,  sitting  in  by  proxy,  and  as  a sample  of  window  display  material. 

MANAGERS'  ROUND  TABLE  SECTION.  JANUARY  21,  1956  41 


^etilna 


ina 


k 


THE  LIEUTENANT  WORE  SKIRTS— 20+h 
Century-Fox.  CinemaScope,  in  color  by 
Deluxe.  Tom  Ewell,  keeping  up  with  his 
"itches" — in  "Seven  Year  Itch" — will  keep 
you  in  stitches,  and  Sheree  North,  to  re- 
mind you  of  the  skirts.  The  hilarious  story 
of  a husband  who  got  nervous  because  his 
wife  was  a lieutenant  in  military  service, 
and  the  riotous  things  he  did  to  get  her 
back.  24-sheet  and  all  posters  are  unusual 
in  style  and  color,  and  will  make  excellent 
cut-outs  for  lobby  or  marquee  display. 
You  can  build  your  front  to  style  by  follow- 
ing this  poster  theme.  Two-color  herald 
features  scenes  and  selling  approach  to  key 
your  campaign  for  the  picture.  Newspaper 
ad  mats  are  "wacky" — in  the  manner  of  the 
movie.  "The  lieutenant  was  a lady.  Her 
husband,  was  a "wack" — who  drove  the  Air 
Force  crazy,  till  he  got  her  back!"  Some 
very  large  ads,  and  some  very  unusual  ones 
that  are  worth  the  space.  The  complete 
campaign  mat,  which  should  be  on  your 
standing  order  at  National  Screen,  costs 
only  35c  and  gives  you  seven  ad  mats  and 
slugs,  and  two  publicity  mats,  sufficient  for 
small  theatres  everywhere,  and  you  have 
the  benefit  of  a selection  at  the  press,  at 
no  greater  cost  than  one  ordinary  mat. 
Don't  cut  it  up  yourself — take  it  to  your 
printer.  Make  a point  of  honoring  the 
WAF's  in  your  city — the  women  in  uniform 
who  helped  to  win  the  wars. 

THE  COURT  MARTIAL  OF  BILLY  MIT- 
CHELL— Warner  Brothers.  CinemaScope, 
in  WarnerColor.  Starring  Gary  Cooper  in 
his  role  of  roles!  . The  explosive  story  of  a 
fighting  man  who  "fought  too  hard" — and 
set  off  the  most  sensational  trial  in  U.  S. 
history!  All  the  staggering  events  that  lead 
a hero  to  risk  the  brand  of  traitor!  Dra- 
matically powerful  as  only  a true  story  can 
be!  24-sheet  is  a brilliant  color-flash  with 
pictorial  art  for  lobby  and  marquee.  All 
posters  contribute  material  for  cut-outs  to 
be  used  as  you  may  wish.  No  mention  of 
any  herald  in  the  pressbook,  but  you  can 
print  your  own  by  using  oversized  ad  mats. 
The  newspaper  advertising  is  strong  and 
sensational  in  that  it  recalls  the  famous 
Court  Martial  that  rocked  the  world.  Even 
the  teaser  ads  are  big,  but  such  a 2-column 
ad  as  No.  205  packs  the  punch.  The  com- 
bination ad  and  publicity  mat,  special  at 
National  Screen  for  only  35c,  contains 
everything  needed  for  small  situations — 
eight  newspaper  ad  mats  and  program 
slugs,  plus  two  publicity  mats.  Billy  Mit- 
chell made  history — and  aviation  respects 
his  daring  in  fighting  for  the  supremacy  of 
the  air.  A set  of  twelve  8x10  color  stills 
will  not  only  sell  color  on  your  screen,  but 
will  tell  this  story  for  promotion  purposes 
to  attract  interested  audiences  among 
those  who  seldom  go  to  the  movies.  A 
supplementary  group  of  ad  mats  is  offered 
in  addition  to  those  in  the  pressbook,  based 
on  first-run  experience  with  the  film. 


THE  NAKED  SEA — RKO-Radio  Pictures. 

In  PatheColor,  and  for  wide  screen.  A 
documentary  of  deep  sea  tuna  fishing,  the 
story  of  12  iron  men  on  a wooden  ship,  and 
their  adventures  through  16  weeks,  catching 
300  tons  of  tuna,  off  the  coasts  of  Panama, 
Equador  and  the  Galapagos  Islands.  We 
saw  this  film,  and  reviewed  it,  favorably, 
and  now  we  think  it  is  an  exploitation  pic- 
ture, for  men,  and  for  local  food  store 
tleups.  Not  since  "The  Third  Man"  has  any 
picture  had  a music  score  with  such  promo- 
tional possibilities.  The  record  album  of 
the  harmonica  and  guitar  accompaniment 
for  "Naked  Sea"  is  now  a best  seller.  The 
underwater  scenes,  and  the  volcanic  action 
off  the  Galapagos,  are  unusual  beyond 
ordinary  description.  Six  sheet  and  other 
posters  have  material  for  lobby  and  mar- 
quee display.  A herald  keys  the  campaign 
and  will  get  food-store  cooperative  adver- 
tising. Newspaper  ad  mats  are  assorted 
for  size  and  style,  and  may  get  sponsorship. 

DIANE — MGM.  CinemaScope,  in  Eastman 
Color.  Lana  Turner  dares  the  devil!  She 
stole  the  man  who  belonged  to  the  woman 
everyone  feared!  Historical  romance,  based 
on  the  original  novel  by  John  Erskine. 
"Diane"  was  a name  of  shame  ...  a na- 
tional scandal  . . . and  a v/oman  in  love! 
Secret  love  at  the  risk  of  life.  24-sheet  has 
material  for  a terrific  cut-out  as  lobby  or 
marquee  display.  All  posters  and  accesso- 
ries follow  the  same  advertising  theme,  in 
various  sizes  and  styles.  Two-color  herald 
from  Cato  Show  Print  keys  the  sales  ap- 
proach— order  the  herald  blank,  imprint  it 
locally,  and  sell  the  back  cover,  with  your 
playdates,  to  a cooperative  advertiser  who 
will  pay  the  whole  cost.  Newspaper  ad 
mats  are  generally  too  crowded  with  type 
and  credits,  which  is  a habit  at  MGM,  but 
you  can  find  suitable  material  for  your 
purpose.  The  complete  campaign  mat, 
which  originated  with  Metro,  is  less  care- 
fully selected  than  usual,  but  supplies  ten 
ad  mats  and  slugs,  plus  two  publicity  mats 
and  spare  borders.  Bill  Blake  at  Loew's 
Warfield,  San  Francisco,  used  an  astrologer 
and  mystic  in  costume,  as  a lobby  stunt, 
reading  a crystal  ball,  for  the  benefit  of 
potential  patrons. 


YOU'LL  GET 
THE  FINEST 
TRAILERS 
...IN  THE 
SHORTEST 
TIME.  FROM 


SPECIAL 

TRAILERS 


I 


37  years  of  Know- 
How  means  Belter 
Trailers...  Faster! 


FILMACK 


CHICAGO 
1327  S.  WABASH 


\ NEW  YORK 
X 341  W.  44fh  St. 


. . . Timely  news  supplementing  the 
special  monthly  department  covering 
all  phases  of  refreshment  service. 


PCA  to  Have 
Western  Meet 

The  Popcorn  and  Concessions  Associa- 
tion (formerly  the  International  Popcorn 
Association)  will  begin  its  1956  schedule  of 
North  American  regional  meetings  with  its 
first  annual  Western  Conference  on  Feb- 
ruary 29  at  the  Desert  Inn,  Las  Vegas, 
Nev.,  according  to  an  announcement  by 
Bert  Nathan,  president  of  the  association 
and  head  of  the  Theatre  Popcorn  Vending 
Corporation,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

Serving  as  co-chairmen  of  the  conference 
will  be  Harold  F.  Chesler,  Theatre  Candy 
Distributing  Company,  Salt  Lake  City,  and 
Arthur  Unger,  Arthur  Unger  Company,  San 
Francisco.  Assisting  them  will  be  Harlan 
Fairbanks,  Harlan  Fairbanks  Company. 
Seattle ; Sam  Gillette,  Theatre  Candy  Dis- 
tributing Company,  Salt  Lake  City;  and 
Thomas  J.  Sullivan,  PC.\  executive  vice- 
president. 

Plans  call  for  holding  two  segment  ses- 
sions— one  for  theatre-concession  operators 
and  the  other  for  manufacturer-wholesale 
men.  Speakers  will  be  industry  executives, 
serving  as  discussion  leaders  on  an  agenda 
of  current  topics.  Mr.  Nathan  will  speak 
on  “What  to  Look  for  in  a Good  Conces- 
sion Operation.” 

The  conference  will  begin  with  a com- 
bined breakfast  at  the  Desert  Inn  and  morn- 
ing meetings  will  be  scheduled  from  9:30 
to  12.30  P.M.  Those  attending  will  lunch 
together,  and  afternoon  sessions  will  run 
from  2 to  S :30  P.M.,  followed  by  a sup- 
pliers’ cocktail  party  and  combined  dinner. 
Attendance  prizes  will  be  offered  by  sup- 
pliers. 

Invitations  from  PCA  have  been  placed 
in  the  mail  to  members,  but  the  conference 
is  to  be  an  open  one  and  non-members  are 
eligible  to  attend.  Attendance  reservations 
should  be  made  with  Harold  F.  Chesler, 
Theatre  Candy  Distributing  Company,  251 
East  Second  South,  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah, 
or  with  Arthur  Unger,  361  Golden  Gate 
Avenue,  San  Francisco  2,  Calif. 

Raphael  Joins  Candy  Firm 

Murray  H.  Raphael  has  been  appointed 
(|uality  control  director  of  the  Chunky 
Chocolate  Corporation,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y., 
according  to  an  announcement  by  Jeff  Jaffe, 
president.  Mr.  Raphael  has  had  20  years 
of  experience  in  private  industry  and  health 
regulatory  agencies. 


42 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  21.  1956 


FILM  BUYERS  RATING 


l-ilm  huyers  of  independent  circuits  in  the  U.  S.  rate  current 
product  on  the  basis  of  its  performance  in  their  theatres.  This 
report  covers  106  attractions,  4,05  2 play  dates. 

Titles  run  alphabetically.  Numerals  refer  to  the  number  of  en- 
gagements on  each  attraction  reported.  The  tabulation  is  cumula- 
tiie.  Dagger  (f)  denotes  attractions  published  for  the  first  time. 
Asterisk  indicates  attractions  tvhich  are  listed  for  the  last  time. 

EX  means  Excellent;  AA — Above  Average;  AV— Average; 
BA — Below  Average;  PR — Poor. 


Magnificent  Matador  (20th-Fox) 
Man  Alone,  A (Rep.)  . . 

Man  From  Bitter  Ridge  (U-l) 
Man  From  Laramie  (Col.). 

Man  With  the  Gun  (U.A.)  . 

Marty  (U.A.)  

McConnell  Story,  The  (W.B.) 
Mister  Roberts  (W.B.) 

Moonfleet  (MGM) 

My  Sister  Eileen  (Col.)  . 


A & C Meet  the  Mummy  (U-l) 
African  Lion,  The  (B.V.) 

Ain't  Misbehavin'  (U-l) 

Apache  Woman  (ARC) 

Artists  and  Models  (Par.). 


EX  AA  AV  BA  PR 


- 4 13  8 I 

12  5 2 - 

3 28  14  2 

- 2 2 - - 

5 6 - - - 


(Naked  Dawn  ( U-l ) . 

Naked  Street  (U.A.) 

Night  Holds  Terror,  The  (Col.) 
Night  of  the  Hunter  (U.A.) 

Not  as  a Stranger  ( U.A.) 


One  Desire  (U-l) 


Big  Knife,  The  (U.A.)  . . 

Blood  Alley  (W.B.)  

Bring  Your  Smile  Along  (Col.) 


Chicago  Syndicate  (Col.) 

Cobweb,  The  (MGM) 

Count  Three  and  Pray  (Col.) 
Creature  with  the  Atom  Brain  (Col.) 


Dam  Busters  (W.B.)  ... 

Davy  Crockett  (B.V.) 

Desert  Sands  (U.A.) 

Desperate  Hours  (Par.)  .. 
Duel  on  the  Mississippi  (Col.) 


Pearl  of  the  South  Pacific  (RKO) 
Pe're  Kellv's  Blues  (W.B.) 

Phenix  City  Story  (A. A.) 

Private  War  of  Major  Benson  (U-l) 
Prize  of  Gold,  A (Col.) 

Purple  Mask  (U-l) 


Queen  Bee  (Col.) 

Quentin  Durward  (MGM). 


(Rains  of  Ranchipur  (20th-Fox) 
Rebel  Without  a Cause  (W.B.) 
Return  of  Jack  Slade  (A. A.)  . . 


Far  Horizons.  The  (Par.) 
Female  on  the  Beach  (U-l)  . 
5 Against  the  House  (Col.) 
Footsteps  in  the  Foq  (Col.) 
Foxfire  (U-l)  . . ... 

Francis  in  the  Navy  (U-l) 


Gentlemen  Marry  Brunettes  (U.A.)  . 
Girl  in  the  Red  Velvet  Swing  (20th-Fox) 
Girl  Rush.  The  ( Par.) 

Good  Morning,  Miss  Dove  (20th-Fox) 


llcuse  of  Bamboo  (20th-Fox) 

How  to  be  Very,  Very  Popular  (20th-Fox) 

I Am  a Camera  (DCA)  . 

I Died  a Thousand  Times  (W.B.) 

Illegal  (W.B.) 

Interrupted  Melody  (MGM) 

It  Came  From  Beneath  the  Sea  (Col.)  . . . 
It's  Always  Fair  Weather  (MGM)  .... 


Kentuckian,  The  (U.A.) 
King's  Thief,  The  (MGM) 

Kismet  (MGM) 

Kiss  of  Fire  ( U-l ) 


Lady  and  the  Tramp  (B.V.) 

Lady  Godiva  ( U-l ) 

Land  of  the  Pharaohs  (W.B.)  

Last  Command,  The  (Rep.)  

Lawless  Street,  A (Col.) 

Left  Hand  of  God,  The  (20th-Fox)  . 

Love  is  a Many-Splendored  Thing  (20th-Fox) 

Love  Me  or  Leave  Me  (MGM)  

Lucy  Gallant  ( Par.) 


I 


7 


I 


6 


29 


18 

7 


1 

33 

13 

7 

4 

30 

14 

9 

- 

12 

7 

3 

- 

4 

2 

10 

21 

24 

15 

3 

12 

28 

1 1 

1 

7 

18 

7 

14 

2 

15 

22 

18 

- 

2 

22 

18 

9 

2 

5 

4 

20 

23 

15 

17 

5 

3? 

10 

13 

2 

_ 

4 

- 

3 

5 

3 

_ 

6 

1 

2 

7 

16 

22 

10 

21 

9 

6 

3 

1 

13 

23 

25 

27 

25 

9 

6 

- 

7 

1 1 

8 

1 

8 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 1 

3 

27 

24 

4 

2 

- 

3 

5 

3 

3 

16 

23 

14 

1 

7 

10 

12 

- 

3 

1 

- 

35 

20 

5 

4 

24 

38 

10 

3 

36 

27 

8 

6 

- 

10 

7 

7 

Scarlet  Coat  (MGM)  . 

Sea  Chase,  The  (W.B.) 

Second  Greatest  Sex.  The  (U-l) 
Seven  Cities  of  Gold  (20th-Fox) 
Seven  Little  Foys  (Par.) 

Seven  Year  Itch  (20th-Fox) 
Sh.-ike,  The  ( U-l ) 

Sincerely  Yours  (W.B.) 

Soldier  of  Fortune  (20fh-Fox) 

*Son  of  Sinbad  (RKO)  

f Spoilers,  The  ( U-l ) 

*Strange  Lady  in  Town  (W.B.) 
Summe.-time  (U.A.) 


Tall  Man  Riding  (W.B.) 

Tall  Men,  The  (20th-Fox) 
Tarantula  ( U-l ) 

Tender  Trap  (MGM) 
Tennessee's  Partner  (RKO) 
Texas  Lady  ( RKO ) 

Three  Stripes  in  the  Sun  (Col.) 

To  Catch  a Thief  (Par.) 

To  Hell  and  Back  (U-l) 

Treasure  of  Pancho  Villa  (RKO) 
Trial  ( MGM ) 


Ulysses  (Par.) 


View  From  Pompey's  Head  (20th-Fox) 
Virgin  Queen,  The  (20th-Fox) 

Warriors,  The  (A. A.) 

We're  No  Angels  (Par.) 

Wichita  (A. A.)  


You're  Never  Too  Young  (Par.) 


EX 

2 

2 

10 

I 

7 

I 

36 


10 


6 

3 

16 

2 


I 

33 

43 


3 

3 


6 

22 

1 

3 

2 
I 


2 

I 


AA 

AV 

BA 

PR 

14 

22 

19 

5 

7 

8 

10 

- 

13 

9 

7 

3'r 

25 

15 

8 

1 

5 

3 

- 

1 

10 

4 

17 

28 

32 

14 

3 

29 

1 1 

3 

- 

5 

4 

20 

6 

10 

1 7 

8 

14 

- 

1 

4 

1 

- 

- 

4 

2 

- 

3 

6 

17 

3 

10 

13 

2 

34 

13 

10 

1 

1 1 

13 

7 

- 

8 

15 

9 

19 

10 

35 

9 

13 

22 

16 

1 

23 

29 

18 

8 

2 

10 

8 

3 

2 

10 

15 

6 

3 

3 

4 

- 

3 

6 

16 

4 

3 

2 

- 

29 

10 

2 

- 

2 

6 

- 

- 

8 

9 

21 

7 

52 

18 

5 

2 

4 

3 

2 

- 

9 

9 

19 

28 

10 

10 

10 

36 

19 

4 

2 

2 

7 

15 

12 

1 

5 

6 

6 

26 

26 

16 

4 

3 

10 

16 

14 

2 

3 

1 

- 

1 1 

21 

16 

2 

6 8 7 9 


15  12  II  3 

23  I I I 

2 - 3 - 

4 7 4 - 

III  6 4 

12  3- 

4 6 3 - 

12  22  14  5 

26  3 I - 

- 9 9 18 

2 16  9 3 


7 10  5 


6 10  16  24 

12  10  13 


- 6 5 - 

7 21  22  10 

19  16  5 4 


21  18  13 


3 


I 


“ONE  OF  THE  BEST  OF  THE  YEAR 


. . . the  range  of 
Mr.  Guinness'  talent  is 
brilliantly  and  movingly 
revealed.  Beautifully  done 
in  every  way.  All  of  this  is 
immensely  absorbing." 

—Bosley  Crowfher,  N.Y.  Times 


“GUINNESS 

SUPREME 

A monumental 
experience  . . . 
the  impact 
is  shattering." 

— Alton  Cook, 

N.Y.  World-Tele. 


“CERTAINLY 
ONE  OF  HIS  BEST 

. . . Guinness  gives  a 
strong,  lean  performance, 
a superbly  controlled 
bit  of  acting." 

— William  K.  Zinsser, 

N.Y.  Herald  Tribune 


Sun 


“CAN  BE  ENJOYED  BY  A WIDE  AUDIENCE” 


**★★★★  4 STARS 

...  a powerfully 
appealing  drama  . . . 
at  all  times 
challenging  to 
the  imagination. 

Guinness'  perform- 
ance is  masterly." 

—Kate  Cameron, 

N.Y.  Daily  News 


“NDTHING  SHORT 
OF  SUPERB 

...  a compelling 
narrative,  tensely 
dramatic." 

—Rose  Pelswick, 


N.Y.  Journal 


American 


—Film  Daily 


Ofice,  I*  ! 

BSfeS  FPHtS.  Mi 


fANUAJOf  28,  1956 


Hi 


ALLIED^  TOA  IN  PACT 


rOA  Withdraws  Consent 


to  Arbitration  PIdn 


to  Circuits  as  Producers 


REl^WS  • (In  Proc 
ALIAS  JOHN  PRESTON 


GOES.  THE  COURT  JESTER,  POSTMARK  FOR  DA 


secondda.^s  matter  Janiiars 
fj'  Quialcy  Piiblisliinp 
Americas.  $10.00  a .veorl 


,.ip- 


m/iC- 


REAL  LIFE 


1,75  0,0  0 0 
copies  roll  off 
presses!  First 
printings  of 
1,2  50,000 
sold  in  60  days!  ^ 
Nationwide 
best-seller ! 


TRUE  STORY 
POWER  MAKES 
M-G-M’s  "I’LL  CRY 
TOMORROW” 
BOX-OFFICE 


DYNAMITE! 

Seldom  has  any  personality  so  engrossed  the 
nation  as  the  famed  song-star  Lillian  Roth, 
who  went  from  fame  to  shame  and  coura- 
geously fought  her  way  back  to  the  top.  Susan 
Hayward  {above)  portrays  her  life  in  a perform- 
ance to  remember.  They  are  seen  together 
{right)  at  the  Los  Angeles  Premiere. 


STORY  CAPTIVATES  NATION! 


CHICAGO 

6th  Sensational  Week!  Tops  every 
M-G-M  hit  including  "GWTW”  at 
United  Artists  Theatre. 

LOS  ANGELES 

6th  Record-Smashing  Week!  Biggest 
in  history  of  4-Star  Theatre. 


1 


NEW  YORK 

3rd  Big  Week!  Never  such  word-of- 
mouth  from  enthusiastic  audiences 
at  packed  Radio  City  Music  Hall! 


KIT 


I’LL  CRY  TOMORROW 

SUSAN  HAY. WARD' 


TAYIOR'RAY  DA'ITI 


.EN  DEUTSCH  and  J^Y  Rl 
ted  by  DANIEL  MANN  • Pro 


a^RI 


RD  KENNEDY 


Based  On  the  Book  ‘TLl  CRY  TOMORROW”  byj 
Lillian  Rolh,  Mike  Connolly  and  Gerold  FrankJ 


LAWRENCE  WEINGARTEN 

{^Available  in  P&rspecta  Stereophmic  or  l^loanneJ:.  Sound) 


M-G-M  WEEK  — FEB.  5-11  • “An  M-G-M  Picture  On  Every  Screen  of  the  World" 


Paris  rescues 
Helen  from 
the  victory-crazed 
pillagers  of  Troy! 


I 


WarnerCqlor 


AIN  HAS  GONE 


EMIERE! 


NATIONALLY  ADVERTISED! 

Full  page  ads  in  Life,  Look,  Collier’s 
and  ten  other  National  Magazines 
readership  of  more  than  83  million! 


The  handsome 
prince  bests 
giant  Ajax  in 
fantastic  test! 


The  awestruck  populace  sees  how 
' theif  rTiightyjector  has  fallen! 


Fiery  bow-battalions 
seek  to  stem  the 
raging  Spartan  tide! 




GIANT  TV-AND  RADIO  COVERAGE! 

Three  weeks  on  “Truth  or 
Consequences”  NBC-TV  and 
radio— Jan.  20,  27,  Feb.  3! 

Premiere  carried  on  Art  Linkletter 
“House  Party”  CBS-TV  and 
radio— Jan.  27! 
Full  newsreel  coverage  on  premieres 
on  NBC-TV  (including  TODAY 
show,  Jan.  27),  CBS-TV  and  ABC-TV! 
Radio  saturation  covering  premieres 
by  Shirley  Thomas  on  NBC  — 
MONITOR;  by  Jim  Boysen  on 
ABC  Network;  by  Bob  Osterburg 
on  Mutual  Network  and  others! 


INTERNATIDNALLY  PRDMDTED! 

A never-before  multi-country  fashion 
and  beauty  contest!  Almost  all 
world  capitals  participating  — with 
tremendous  magazine,  newspaper 
and  newsreel  coverage— 
and  more  coming! 


NEWSREEL  CDVERAGE! 

On-the-spot  cameras  cover  the 
premieres  all  over  the  world!  Combined 
newsreel  to  be  shown  on  TV! 


ACK  SERNAS  asParis 

TANLEY  BAKER -NIALL  MacGINNIS-  | 
< ;H  gray  Directed  5^  ROBERT  WISE 


SCHDDL  PRDMDTIDN! 

Special  booklets  and  study  guides 
offering  picture-and-text  presentation 
of  the  picture— in  schools  and 
colleges  throughout  U.  S. ! 


ALL  THIS  - AND  MDRE! 

Including  gigantic  magazine  and 
Sunday  supplement  coverage  with 
covers  and  big  spreads  in  Life, 
Collier’s,  This  Week  and  dozens  more! 


Mr.  Showman 


The  Bottom  of  the  Bottle 


is  ready 

now  to  challenge  anyone’s  picture  for  sheer  DARING.  The  theme 
—brother  against  brother,  man  against  woman— is  DARING.  The 
treatment— frank,  vital,  realistic— is  DARING.  The  locale  is  the 
Ranch  Society  Jungle  of  today’s  great  Southwest,  shown  for  the 
first  time  in  CinemaScope.  It  is  a background  of  money-to-burn 
playboys  and  go-along  girls  who  must  hold  up  their  end,  of  thrill- 
seeking husbands  and  fun-loving  wives.  This  is  UNIQUELY  DARING. 

The  public  today  responds  quickest  to  the  picture  with  some- 
thing new.  Such  pictures  do  top  business  because  they  are  the 
most  talked  about.  They’ll  be  talking  plenty  about  this  explosive 
drama,  its  eyebrow-raising  situations,  its  rugged  western  action, 
the  brilliant  acting  of  its  four  stars,  most  of  all  about  those 
locked  bedroom  doors,  the  wild  parties,  THE  INSATIABLE  DARING. 


?Olh  Ccntvi 


VAN 


JOSEPH 


RUTH 


JOHNSON 


CARSON 


ROMAN 


COHEN 


HC  HCAOEO  THE  SOUTHWEST'S 
MOST  DESPEITATE  MANHUNTI 


AS  THE  BROTHBR 
WHO  f OUGHT  HfS  WAY  I 


AS  THE  BROTHER 
WHO  BOUGHT  HIS  WAYl 


AS  THE  WOMAN 
CAUGHT  IN  THE  MIDDLE! 


From  GEORGES  SIMENON’S  searing  novel! 


kWiMI 


COLOR  tyy  DC  LUXE  ^^0 

CINemaScoPE 


wrth  MARGARET  HAYES  ORUCE  BENNEH 

Produced  by 

BUDDY  ADLER 

OifKWd  by 

HENRY  HATHAWAY 

SctMAplay  by 

SYDNEY  BOEHM 

M STCREOPHONK  SOUND 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD 




MARTIN  QUIGLEY,  Editor-in-Chief  and  Publisher 

MARTIN  QUIGLEY,  /K.,  Editor 

IZ(i 

Vol.  202.  No.  4 

January  28,  1956 

Confidence  in  Theatres 

The  pessimism  in  some  quarters  about  the  ability 
of  motion  picture  theatres  to  withstand  television 
and  every  other  form  of  competition  is  definitely 
not  shared  by  the  major  producing-distributing  com- 
panies. Many  pictures  in  production  in  Hollywood  are 
of  a character  and  scope  that  can  only  make  reasonable 
profit  in  theatrical  distribution. 

A significant  case  in  point  is  the  recent  announcement 
that  20th  Century-Fox  will  spend  over  $100,000,000  on 
its  1956  productions.  The  company  has  stepped  up  its 
release  schedule  to  at  least  two  films  per  month.  In 
addition  several  of  the  studio’s  most  important  produc- 
tions are  being  filmed  in  the  55mm  process  which,  accord- 
ing to  Darryl  F.  Zanuck,  studio  head,  increases  the  cost 
of  each  picture  by  $200,000. 

At  the  recent  demonstration  in  New  York  of  the  55mm 
process  with  scenes  from  “Carousel”  and  “The  King 
and  I”  Spyros  P.  Skouras,  20th-Fox  president,  expressed 
his  confidence  in  these  words,  “New  technical  develop- 
ments plus  important  subjects  will  maintain  the  screen’s 
superiority  over  any  other  medium.”  That  faith  is  backed 
not  with  money  alone  but  also  with  great  enthusiasm, 
which  is  one  priceless  ingredient  everyone  in  the  industry/ 
should  cultivate. 


Quotable  Quote — “If  it  wasn’t  for  the  Code,  the  in- 
dustry would  be  at  the  mercy  of  horrible  local  censor- 
ship.”— Darryl  F.  Zanuck  in  Paris  to  Art  Buchwald. 


New  View  of  Movie  Making 

Note  should  be  taken  of  the  fact  that  there  are 
some  signs  that  the  nation’s  press  is  taking  a 
new  and  constructive  attitude  towards  Holly- 
wood and  motion  picture  making  in  general.  There  are 
still  many  stories  filed  by  the  hundreds  of  correspondents 
in  Hollywood  that  reflect  no  credit  on  the  industry  and 
its  personalities.  On  the  other  hand  there  is  a more 
widespread  recognition  of  the  importance  and  serious- 
ness of  film  making  than  ever  before. 

An  important  example  of  this  refreshing  and  ulti- 
mately beneficial  attitude  is  the  recent  extensive  treat- 
ment of  Hollywood  in  “Look”  magazine  by  Leo  C. 
Rosten  (Leonard  Q.  Ross).  Fifteen  years  ago  this  so- 
ciologist and  economist  wrote  a 45-page  book  which  was 
quite  critical  of  the  methods  and  mores  of  the  powers 
of  the  production  colony.  In  the  illustrated  article  for 
“Look”  Dr.  Rosten  gave  an  excellent,  comprehensive 
viewpoint  of  Hollywood.  The  author’s  warm  regard  for 
film  makers  and  his  realization  of  the  serious  work  car- 


ried on  certainly  made  an  impact  on  millions  of  readers. 

Also  of  interest  is  that  almost  simultaneously  “News- 
week” magazine  featured  in  a cover  story  motion  pic- 
tures, highlighting  “Moby  Dick”  and  director  John 
Huston  but  including  an  impressive  list  of  important 
features  scheduled  for  release  in  the  next  twelve  months. 
“Newsweek”  hailed  1956  a “vintage  year”  for  Hollywood. 


De  Mille  on  Industry's  State 

IT  was  fortunate  for  Hollywood  and  the  industry  in 
general  that  Cecil  B.  De  Mille  did  not  confine  himself 
to  brief  remarks  of  thanks  when  he  accepted  Janu- 
ary 22  the  Milestone  Award  of  the  Screen  Producers 
Guild.  Instead  Mr.  De  Mille,  drawing  on  his  four  dec- 
ades of  important  picture  making,  told  his  colleagues, 
and  through  them  all  members  of  the  industry,  a number 
of  things  he  felt  needed  telling. 

Mr.  De  Mille  deplored  tendencies  in  the  industry  which 
resist  unity  and  “the  temptation  to  care  nothing  about 
what  we  put  on  the  screen  as  long  as  it  makes  money.” 
He  called  for  resistance  to  censorship  and  outside  pres- 
sure groups. 

The  long  line  of  De  Mille  features,  climaxed  by  “The 
Ten  Commandments”  now  being  edited,  have  been  char- 
acterized by  a high  order  of  screen  quality  and  of  wide 
audience  appeal — for  people  of  all  ages,  everywhere.  Mr. 
De  Mille  has  been  a symbol  of  Hollywood.  His  services 
have  not  been  confined  to  the  entertainment  screen.  Even 
now  he  is  chief  consultant  on  motion  pictures  to  the 
United  States  Information  Agency.  Inside  and  outside 
the  industry  his  words  always  rate  close  attention. 


C|  Names  Please?  Lester  Cole  has  a letter  published 
in  the  New  York  Times  of  Sunday,  January  22,  which 
said  “.  . . those  who  were  great  ten  years  ago  and  who 
are  still  permitted  to  work  in  Hollywood  are  either  spir- 
itually degraded  or  cynically  resigned.”  An  inspection 
of  the  list  of  the  top  ten  producers,  directors  and  writers 
in  the  FAME  records  for  1946 — certainly  a list  of  “those 
who  were  great  ten  years  ago” — gives  no  clue  about  what 
Mr.  Cole  has  in  mind.  Apart  from  a few  no  longer  alive, 
almost  all  on  the  list  ten  years  ago  are  still  at  work  in 
Hollywood  with  no  indication  in  their  films  that  they 
are,  as  Mr.  Cole  put  it,  “spiritually  degraded  or  cynically 
resigned.”  The  list  includes  such  names  as  Michael 
Curtiz,  Mervyn  Le  Roy,  Alfred  Hitchcock,  Curtis  Bern- 
hardt, Otto  Preminger,  George  Marshall,  Pandro  S. 
Berman,  Samuel  Goldwyn,  David  O.  Selznick,  Hal  B. 
Wallis,  Arthur  Freed  and  Charles  Brackett.  Presumably 
Mr.  Cole  has  a “great”  names  list  of  his  own. 

— Martin  Quigley,  Jr. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD 


cJCetterS  to  tLe  ..J^et'uicl 


January  28,  1956 


Awards  Poll 

To  THE  Editor: 

As  a member  of  tlie  original  committee 
charged  with  devising  the  Audience  Awards 
poll  plan.  I have  given  careful  thought  to 
the  results  of  the  project,  and  have  come  to 
the  conclusion  that  on  two  of  the  most  im- 
portant points  it  was  a complete  failure. 

The  most  desired  object  of  the  poll  was 
to  overcome  the  apathetic  attitude  of  the 
-American  public  toward  motion  pictures  and 
reawaken  their  interest  in  the  industry.  The 
actual  voting  itself  was  the  means  to  an  end 
— the  end  to  be  a tremendous  television  pro- 
gram. comparable  in  its  impact  to  the  an- 
nual Academy  Awards  television  show.  Our 
committee  was  aw'are  that  millions  of  our 
so-called  “lost”  show-goers  are  now  sitting 
in  front  of  their  television  sets,  and  w'e  felt 
that  such  an  exciting  program  emanating 
from  Hollyw'ood  would  re-create  a desire  to 
go  to  the  movies,  especially  to  the  pictures 
and  stars  winning  the  aw’ards.  As  a matter 
of  fact,  the  finality  of  our  whole  campaign 
was  predicated  on  such  a program  and  much 
time  was  consumed  in  discussing  the  date, 
place  and  manner  of  its  presentation. 

W’hen  it  was  decided  that  the  plan  for  the 
T\'  program  had  to  be  abandoned,  and  the 
announcement  of  the  winners  would  be  made 
through  the  medium  of  the  public  press,  I 
felt  at  that  time  that  the  principal  purpose 
of  the  poll  had  been  destroyed,  and  I be- 
lieve the  results  have  confirmed  my  appre- 
hension. Of  course,  I can  only  speak  for 
what  happened  in  Indiana,  hut  I see  no  rea- 
son why  our  state  should  he  an  exception. 
On  the  day  following  the  awards,  I know 
of  two  press  services,  AP  and  INS,  that 
did  not  carry  one  line  of  news  concerning 
the  event.  My  home  town  of  Decatur,  Ind., 
has  a daily  newspaper  with  INS  service  and 
not  a single  word  came  over  the  teletype. 

In  the  neighboring  large  city  of  Fort 
Wayne,  the  morning  newspaper  did  not 
carry  a story  and  the  evening  paper  had  a 
few  paragraphs  under  the  hy-line  of  a Holly- 
wood correspondent.  Inasmuch  as  I was  ex- 
tremely interested,  I called  our  Allied  office 
in  Indianapolis  and  was  informed  that  the 
morning  papers  in  that  city  had  no  story. 
That  entire  following  day  I listened  to  news- 
casts on  both  radio  and  television  and  from 
the  Fort  Wayne  stations  there  was  not  one 
announcement  of  the  awards  results. 

Last  week  our  Allied  board  of  directors 
met  in  Indianapolis  and  our  discussion  re- 
vealed the  same  situation  was  true  through- 
out our  entire  state.  Therefore,  I feel  I am 
entirely  correct  when  I state  that  one  of 
the  prime  objectives  of  the  campaign — a 
publicity  penetration  of  impressive  impact 
to  the  American  public — was  a complete  and 
total  failure. 

A second  objective  of  the  campaign,  and 


THE  BEST  GUIDE 

To  the  Editor: 

We  use  the  "Film  Buyers  Rating” 
very  extensively  for  buying  and  book- 
ing pictures.  We  have  found  that  it 
is  the  best  guide  that  we  have  access 
to  in  this  respect.  I imagine  a great 
many  exhibitors  use  this  guide,  even 
though  they  may  not  contribute  to 
same. — A.  FULLER  SAMS,  Jr.,  Presi- 
dent, Statesville  Theatre  Corporation, 
Statesville,  North  Carolina. 


the  reason  for  its  being  held  on  the  dates 
selected,  was  to  enable  American  exhibitors 
to  re-book  the  award  winning  pictures  and 
stars  in  the  slow  weeks  just  before  Christ- 
mas. Again  I can  only  speak  for  Indiana, 
but  when  I attempted  to  book  “East  of 
Eden”  for  a repeat  run,  I was  advised  that 
it  had  been  withdrawn  from  distribution. 
Obviously  exhibition  was  not  to  gain  what- 
ever benefit  the  poll  might  have  produced, 
but  distribution  saw  a chance  to  cash  in. 
Again  referring  to  publicity,  I cannot  un- 
derstand why  Warner  Bros,  in  two  of  the 
television  programs  subsequent  to  the 
awards,  made  not  the  slightest  mention  of 
the  event,  even  though  their  company  won 
a large  proportion  of  the  “Audies.” 

This  letter  is  not  being  written  purely  in 
a spirit  of  criticism.  As  one  who  had  some 
small  part  in  the  development  of  an  idea  for 
which  we  held  such  high  hopes,  I am  only 
expressing  my  bitter  disappointment  in  the 
unhappy  culmination. — ROY  L.  KALVER, 
President,  Allied  Theatre  Ozvtiers  of  In- 
diana, Decatur,  Indiana. 


Page 


CINEMASCOPE  55  called  "impres- 
sive” in  New  York  showing  12 

TOA  AND  ALLIED  join  forces  on 
arbitration  and  divorced  circuits  I 3 

CECIL  B.  DeMILLE  calls  for  vigilance 
to  fight  "corrupting  forces"  16 

TAX  CUT  fight  takes  shape  as  O'Don- 
nell Is  named  campaign  chairman  18 

RKO  library  to  go  to  television  buy- 
ers as  a package  19 

20TH-FOX  offers  films  made  for  tele- 
vision to  British  theatres  22 

ELMER  RHODEN  notes  sharp  upturn 
in  theatre  attendance  24 

TECHNICOLOR,  Inc.  reports  year's 
profit  of  $2,064,820  24 

ALEXANDER  KORDA  dies  in  London 
at  age  of  62  26 

REPUBLIC  allocates  $15,000,000  for 
1956  half-year  budget  27 

BROTHERHOOD  award  dinner  set  in 
New  York  for  January  31  28 

NATIONAL  SPOTLIGHT— Notes  on 
personnel  across  country  29 

SERVICE  DEPARTMENTS 

Refreshment  Merchandising  37 

Film  Buyers'  Rating  Third  Cover 

Hollywood  Scene  27 

Managers'  Round  Table  33 

The  Winners'  Circle  26 

IN  PRODUCT  DIGEST  SECTION 

Showmen's  Reviews  761 


Cinemascope  Shorts 

To  THE  Editor  : 

It  is  a pleasure  to  play  the  CinemaScope 
shorts.  They  are  earning  applause  and 
bouquets  at  every  performance  they,  are 
screened.  It  is  a pleasure  now  to  advertise 
these  shorts,  and  you  can  take  our  word  for 
it,  they  increase  our  volume  of  business.  It 
is  very  obvious  that  tbe  producers  are  put- 
ting in  more  care,  attention  and  entertain- 
ment value  in  these  subjects,  which  I have 
always  contended  constitute  a very  large 
part  of  the  success  of  an  evening’s  entertain- 
ment. To  mention  a few — “Tournament  of 
Koses”,  “Tuna  Clipper”,  “This  Supersonic 
Age”,  MGM’s  “Musical  Gems” — all  are 
worth  anybody’s  best  playing  time  and  ad- 
vance publicity.  — DAVE  S.  KLEIN , Astra 
Theatre,  Kitzve  Nkana,  Northern  Rhodesia, 
Africa. 


Short  Subjects 

762 

What  the  Picture  Did  for  Me 

763 

The  Release  Chart 

764 

10TION  PICTURE  HERALD,  Martin  Quigley,  Editer-tn- 
ihief  and  Publisher;  Martin  Quigley,  Jr.,  Ed. tar;  Rayrn^d 
evy  Executive  Publisher;  James  D.  Ivers  News  Editor; 
iharles  S.  Aaronson,  Production  Editor;  Floyd  E.  St^e. 
hoto  Editor;  Ray  Gallagher,  Advertising  Manger;  Gus 
I.  Fausel  Production  Manager.  Bureaus:  Hollywood, 

amuel  D.  Berns,  Manager:  William  R Weav^,  Editor. 
ucca-Vine  Building,  Telephone  HOI  ywood  7-2M5; 
ihicago,  120  So.  LaSalle  St.,  Urbcii  Farley,  Advertising 
epresentative,  Telephone  Financial  6-3074;  Washington, 
. A.  Otten,  National  Press  Club;  London,  Hope  Williams 
urnup  Manager;  Peter  Burnup,  Editor;  Williom^  Pay. 
lews  Editor  4 Golden  Square.  Correspondents  in  the 
rincipal  capitals  of  the  world.  Member  Avdit  Bureau  of 
iirculations.  Motion  Picture  Herald  is  published  every 
aturday  by  Quigley  Publishing  Company,  Inc.,  Roc^' 
;ller  Center,  New  York  City  20.  Telephone  Circle  7;3  00; 
iable  address;  "Quigpubco,  New  York",  Martin  Quigley, 
resident*  Martin  Quigley,  Jr.,  Vice-President;  Theo.  J. 
ullivan,  Vice-President  and  Treasurer;  Raymond  Levy, 
ice-President,  Leo  J.  Brady,  Secretary.  Other  Quigley 
ubiications:  Better  Theatres  and  Better  Refreshment  Mer- 
handising,  each  published  thirteen  times  a year  as  a 
action  of  Motion  Picture  Herald;  Motion  Picture  Daily, 
elevision  Today,  Motion  Picture  Almanac,  Televisio* 


8 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  28,  1956 


WHEN  AND  WHERE 


On  tLe  Oti 


OFizon 


UPBEAT  TALK 

In  Springfield,  Massachu- 
setts, this  week,  Eric  John- 
ston, president  of  the  Motion 
Picture  Associaton,  had  some 
upbeat  comments  to  make  about 
the  motion  picture  industry. 
"The  American  public  since 
Christmas,  " he  said,  "has  given 
a heartening  demonstration  of 
its  liking  for  motion  pictures. 

. . . The  movies  reciprocate  this 
feeling.  We  don't  think  it's 
just  a light  and  passing  flir- 
tation. Hollywood  is  really 
taking  this  renewed  sign  of  af- 
fection seriously."  He  noted 
that  the  production  colony  is 
increasing  its  output  of  pic- 
tures, and  concentrating  on  big 
ones — big  in  theme,  dramatic 
values  and  ideas.  "The  way 
things  are  going,"  he  said, 
"this  affair  between  Hollywood 
and  the  public  may  turn  out  to 
be  the  Romance  of  the  Year." 

^ & T CONSENTS 

Western  Electric  Corporation 
has  agreed  to  sell  Westrex  Cor- 
poration, its  subsidiary  en- 
gaged in  making  sound  equipment 
for  the  motion  picture  in- 
dustry. This  was  one  of  the 
provisions  included  in  a con- 
sent judgment  entered  this  week 
in  Federal  District  Court  in 
Newark,  terminating  the  Gov- 
ernment's seven-year-old  anti- 
trust case  against  Western 
Electric  and  its  parent  com- 
pany, the  American  Telephone  & 
Telegraph  Company.  In  the  judg- 
ment, Western  and  AT&T  also 


made  sweeping  promises  to  throw 
open  all  their  patents  to  all 
American  firms,  to  get  out  of 
the  business  of  providing  pri- 
vate communications  systems, 
and  to  give  up  manufacturing 
non-communications  equipment. 
Although  the  original  anti- 
trust suit  sought  to  require 
the  parent  company  to  sell 
Western  Electric,  the  judgment 
permits  the  latter  firm  to  con- 
tinue as  the  manufacturing  arm 
of  A T & T. 

SWITCH-OVER 

Although  Hollywood  statisti- 
cal experts  differ  slightly  as 
to  the  number  of  millions  of 
dollars  by  which  the  over-all 
cost  of  making  a year's  product 
will  be  increased  by  the  switch- 
over on  Monday  next  from  a six- 
day  week  to  a five-day  week, 
there  is  no  doubt  in  anybody's 
mind  that  the  increase  will  have 
to  be  met,  finally,  by  (1)  the 
exhibitor,  (2)  his  customer  or 
(3)  both. 

TRUST  LAWS 

Strengthened  anti-trust  laws 
were  urged  in  the  President's 
message  to  Congress.  He  sug- 
gested firms  planning  to  merge 
give  notice  in  advance  ; that 
anti-trust  laws  apply  if  either 
party  is  in  interstate  com- 
merce ; that  Federal  Trade  Com- 
mission "cease  and  desist"  or- 
ders be  final  unless  appealed  ; 
that  the  Attorney  General  be 
empowered  to  demand  documents 


January  29:  Sixth  annual  Communion  Break- 

fast for  Catholics  of  the  motion  picture  In- 
dustry In  the  New  York  area,  Waldorf- 
Astoria  Hotel,  New  York  City. 

January  29-31:  Annual  convention  of  the 

Theatre  Owners  of  North  and  South  Caro- 
lina, to  be  held  In  the  Hotel  Charlotte, 
Charlotte,  N.  C. 

January  30:  Regular  mId-wInter  meeting  of 

the  lATSE  general  executive  board,  Holly- 
wood-Roosevelt  Hotel,  Hollywood. 

February  2:  Commencement  of  hearings,  be- 
fore the  Senate  Small  Business  Subcommit- 
tee, on  trade  practice  complaints  of  motion 
picture  exhibitors,  Washington,  D.  C. 

February  5:  Fifth  annual  Communion  Break- 

fast for  Catholics  of  the  motion  picture  In- 
dustry In  the  Los  Angeles  area,  Hollywood 
Palaalum,  Hollywood. 

February  7-9:  Annual  convention  of  United 

Theatre  Owners  of  Oklahoma,  Skirvin  Hotel, 
Oklahoma  City. 

February  14:  Annual  meeting  and  election  of 
officers  of  Independent  Exhibitors  of  New 
England,  Inc.,  Hotel  Bradford,  Boston. 

February  18-19:  Full  membership  meeting  of 
the  recently  organized  National  Association 
of  Film  Service  Organizations,  Hotel  Cleve- 
land, Cleveland. 

February  20:  Testimonial  dinner  to  M.  B. 

Horowitz,  veteran  Cleveland  exhibitor. 
Hotel  Hollenden,  Cleveland. 

February  20:  MId-wInter  board  of  directors 

meeting  of  Allied  States  Association,  Hotel 
Cleveland,  Cleveland. 

February  21-23:  1956  National  Drive-In  Con- 

vention, Hotel  Cleveland,  Cleveland. 

March  6-7:  Annual  convention  of  the  Kansas- 
Mlssouri  Theatre  Association,  President 
Hotel,  Kansas  City,  Mo. 


without  formal  complaint  ; and 
that  anti-trust  agencies  be 
given  more  money.  Immediate 
support  came  from  anti-trust 
chief  Stanley  N.  Barnes  and 
Representative  Keating  of  New 
York. 

REBOUNDING 

In  key  centers,  reports  in- 
dicate business  is  rebounding. 
Michigan  receipts  began  im-  I 
proving  in  mid-November,  and  I 
continue.  Portland,  Ore.  , first  I 
rions  report  first  run  booms.  I 
New  Haven  says  the  trend  is  I 
good  although  spotty.  Des 
Moines  is  optimistic. 

Floyd  E.  Stone — Vincent 

Canby — William  R.  Weaver 


MPAA  Names  Code  Study  Group 

The  board  of  directors  of  the  Motion  Picture  Association  of  America  Tuesday 
authorized  Eric  Johnston,  president,  to  appoint  a three-man  subcommittee  to 
study  problems  relating  to  the  Production  Code,  methods  of  enforcement  and 
industry  and  public  support  for  purposes  of  the  Code  with  Mr.  Johnston  as 
ex-officio  chairman.  Mr.  Johnston  appointed  as  subcommittee  members  Barney 
Balaban,  president  of  Paramount  Pictures,  and  Abe  Schneider,  vice-president  of 
Columbia  Pictures.  He  indicated  his  intention  to  complete  the  committee  with 
the  appointment  of  Daniel  T.  O'Shea,  president  of  RKO  Radio,  who  was  not 
present  at  the  board  meeting  because  of  absence  in  Hollywood.  It  is  reported 
that  the  scope  of  the  subcommittee's  study  is  to  be  extensive,  encompassing 
possible  Code  amendments,  operations  of  the  Production  Code  Administration 
and  related  matters. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  28,  1956 


9 


TO  "MARTY"  and  to  others  . . . the  New 
Yorit  Film  Critics  annual  awards.  The  cere- 
mony this  year  was  at  Sardi's  restaurant 
and  the  winners  were  "in  person."  A.  H. 
Weiler,  "New  York  Times,"  president  of  the 
critics  group,  center,  poses  with  Hal  Wallis, 
left,  producer  of  "The  Rose  Tattoo,"  accept- 
ing for  Anna  Magnani  (best  actress);  Ernest 
Borgnine,  of  "Marty"  (best  actor);  Harold 
Hecht,  its  co-producer  (best  picture);  and 
David  Lean  (best  director),  of  "Summer- 
time." 


by  the  Herald 

BERNARD  JACON,  lately  IFE's  sales  chief,  Tuesday  in 
New  York  announced  Jacon  Film  Distributors,  dedicated  to 
the  foreign  and  the  independent  American  producer,  and 
with  a staff  particularly  qualified  because  familiar  with  special 
pictures  and  special  handling,  and  eager  because  it  shares 
profits.  It  will  begin  with  16  features,  headed  by  "Samurai" 
and  "Rosanna."  Mr.  Jacon  exuded  optimism  for  "special" 
theatres  and  said  he  didn't  know  of  one  failure  unless  badly 
run  and  that  this  forecasts  the  kind  of  theatres  which  will 
survive.  He  said  he  is  investing  time,  money  and  talent  to 
serve  producers  and  showmen  knowledgeably,  and  invited 
the  industry  two  years  from  now  "to  look  at  the  record." 


DOUGLAS  N.  AMOS  now  is  general 
manager  of  theatre  operations  for 
Lockwood  and  Gordon  Enterprises, 
Boston.  He  succeeds  Louis  Gordon, 
who  retired  from  active  direction  and 
in  recent  elections  was  named  treas- 
urer. Arthur  H.  Lockwood  is  presi- 
dent. Mr.  Amos  had  been  Connecticut 
district  manager. 


TO  "UMBERTO  D"  as  the  best  foreign  language 
picfu  e of  1955  . . . the  Joseph  Burstyn  Award 
from  the  Independent  Motion  Picture  Distrib- 
utors. At  the  ceremony  in  New  York:  Arthur 
Mayer,  distributor  and  partner  of  the  late  Mr. 
Burstyn;  Bosley  Crowther,  "New  York  Times," 
who  presented  the  scroll,  and  Marquese  Ugacci- 
one  Di  Sorbello,  of  the  Italian  Embassy,  accept- 
ing for  producer  Vittorio  De  Sice. 


by  the  Herald 


THE  ADVOCATES,  above.  The  men  are  Robert  W.  Dowling,  realtor,  Thomas  F.  O'Neill,  president  of 
General  Teleradio,  and  Samuel  Rinzier,  circuit  owner,  all  of  New  York,  and  they  will  receive,  Janu- 
ary 31  at  the  Waldorf-Astoria  Hotel,  New  York,  the  annual  Brotherhood  Awards  from  the  National 
Conference  of  Christians  and  Jews.  The  dinner  will  be  attended  by  New  York  industry  leaders. 


I 


I 


I 


I 


TRIBUTE  IN  GRANITE; 
Vermont  granite,  that  is, 
from  B arre,  where  they 
hew  the  stuff.  Governor 
Joseph  B.  Johnson  pre- 
sents the  plaque  to 
William  Murphy,  left, 
and  Chester  Stoddard, 
representing  Martin 
Mullin,  New  England 
Theatres  president,  co- 
founder of  the  Chil- 
dren's Cancer  Research 
Foundation. 


INTERNATIONAL  FASHION  DESIGN  CONTEST,  at  Gimbels,  New  York, 
part  of  Warners'  promotion  for  "Helen  of  Troy."  The  scene  above  shows 
columnist  Igor  Cassini,  feature  editor  Eugenia  Sheppard,  writer  Gloria  Schiff, 
and  fashion  coordinator  Martha  McDowell.  Entries  were  from  27  countries. 
Two  Tokyo  designers  won  first  and  second  prizes  for  sketches,  and  one  from 
Berlin  won  for  photographed  design. 


AT  PARAMOUNT's  studio,  below,  J.  J.  Fitzgibbons,  center.  Famous  Players 
Canadian  president,  purchases  tickets  from  Fred  Lehne,  left,  and  Doug 
Bridges  for  the  Fifth  Annual  Hollywood  Motion  Picture  Industry  Communion 
Breakfast  February  5.  Mr.  Bridges  is  its  general  chairman.  Seventeen  hundred 
are  expected,  and  will  hear  Mass  by  James  Francis,  Cardinal  McIntyre. 


IN  PARIS,  an  opening  of 
RKO's  "The  Conqueror"  (one 
of  the  international  pre- 
mieres); and,  at  the  Marignan 
theatre,  John  Wayne  makes  an 
entrance  in  a lobby  guarded 
by  no  less  than  the  renowned 
Guard  Republicaine. 

AND  IN  HOLLYWOOD,  RKO 
signs  its  first  contract  star, 
Venetia  Stevenson,  17,  daugh- 
ter of  director  Robert  Steven- 
son and  actress  Anna  Lee. 
William  Dozier,  studio  vice- 
president,  left,  says  she's  being 
tested  tor  "Back  to  Eternity." 


ALEC  MOSS  this  week 
became  20th-Fox's  ad- 
vertising manager,  at 
the  New  York  home 
office.  He  has  been 
Howard  Hughes'  adver- 
tising, publicity  and 
exploitation  head.  Para- 
mount's exploitation 
director,  and  Columbia's 
advertising  and  publicity 
chief,  and  also  previous- 
ly has  served  20th-Fox. 
He  will  work  under  ad- 
vertising director  Abe 
Goodman,  who  made 
the  announcement. 


CINEMASCOPE  55  IMPRESSIVE 
FORWARD  PASS  FROM  ORIGINAL 


by  VINCENT  CANBY 

The  Roxy  theatre  in  Xew  York,  whose 
place  in  entertainment  history  is  assured  by 
a number  of  events,  not  tlie  least  of  which 
was  that  initial  CinemaScoi)e  tlemonstration 
two  and  a half  years  ago  (when  it  was  the 
only  theatre  in  the  world  equipped  for  the 
new  medium).  Thursday  of  last  week  added 
another  event  to  its  colorful  history. 

This  was  tlie  kickoff  in  what  is  to  be  a 
world-wide  series  of  CinemaScope  55  demon- 
strations, designed  to  alert  the  industry  and 
the  press  to  a technical  improvement  that 
some  observers  have  said  is  as  far  beyond 
‘‘standard’’  Cinema.^cope  as  CinemaScope 
was  beyond  the  conventional  three-by-four 
screen. 

Host  at  tlie  Roxy  screening',  featuring 
scenes  from  the  two  forthcoming  Rodgers 
and  Hammerstein  musicals,  “Carousel”  and 
"The  King  and  I,”  was  Spyros  P.  .Skouras, 
20th-Fox  president,  assisted  by  the  com- 
pany's executive  assistant  general  sales  man- 
ager. William  C.  Gehring. 

Part  of  the  demonstration  reel,  featuring 
the  comments  and  explanations  of  Darryl  F. 
Zanuck.  production  chief,  and  scenes  from 
“Carousel,”  had  been  previously  shown  at 
the  Allied  States  Association  convention  in 
November  and  several  weeks  later  at  tlie 
home  office  in  New  York. 

In  welcoming  the  approximately  2,000 
members  of  the  film  industry  and  the  lay 
and  trade  press  to  the  Roxy,  Mr.  Skouras 
predicted  that  1956  has  the  potential  of 
being  the  greatest  year  in  the  industry’s 
history  if  its  members  continue  to  adopt 
such  striking  new  advances  as  CinemaScope 
55.  Mr.  Skouras  briefly  referred  to  the 
temper  of  the  times  in  which  CinemaScope 


by  the  Herald 


MR.  SKOURAS  pledging  his  company  io  an 
expenditure  which  newspapers  hailed  as  a 
main  bolster  in  national  economic  welfare. 

had  evolved  and  mentioned  tlie  “unfair  com- 
lietition  of  free  home  television,”  because 
of  which  the  film  industry  had  not  enjoyed 
the  unparalleled  prosperity  experienced  by 
the  rest  of  the  nation’s  economy. 

With  understandable  pride  he  recalled  the 
initial  CinemaScope  demonstration  at  the 
Ro.xy  two  and  a half  years  ago  and  the 
fact  that  today  “there  are  more  than  30,000 
theatres  circling  the  globe  which  show  Cin- 
ema Scope  presentations.” 

Mr.  Skouras  also  spoke  of  the  $70,000,000 
v\'hich  20th-Fox  will  invest  in  productions 
in  1956,  citing  the  figure  as  negative  costs, 
which  will  reach  $100,000,000  with  the  addi- 
tion of  distribution  and  advertising  costs. 
He  said,  “We  are  going  to  release  this  year 
at  least  24  of  the  34  CinemaScope  produc- 
tions scheduled  for  shooting,  because  we 


know  the  public  is  demanding  them  and  the 
exhibitors  need  them.” 

He  added : “This  unparalleled  investment 
and  our  introduction  of  CinemaScope  55  is 
an  expression  of  our  faith  in  the  continuing 
prosperity  of  the  American  economy  and 
the  motion  picture  industry.” 

Mr.  Gehring  addressed  his  remarks  prin- 
cipally to  the  exhibitors  present,  asking  them 
to  equip  for  magnetic  sound.  He  said  that 
priority  in  the  releasing  of  “Carousel”  will 
go  to  the  theatres  equipped  for  stereophonic 
sound.  For  those  12,803  theatres  in  the 
U.  S.  and  Canada  equipped  only  for  optical 
sound,  he  urged  the  installation  of  the  new 
sound  reproducer  that  allows  use  of  one- 
track  magnetic  sound  with  ordinary  optical 
equipment.  He  added  pointedly  that  because 
of  the  width  of  the  single  optical  sound 
tracks,  CinemaScope  prints  so  equipped  suf- 
fer a 10  per  cent  reduction  in  picture  width. 

The  demonstration  footage  from  ‘‘Car- 
ousel” and  “The  King  and  I,”  covering 
musical  and  dramatic  sequences  and  indoor 
and  outdoor  scenes,  was  enthusiastically  ap- 
plauded by  the  assembled  showmen  who 
obviously  agreed  with  Mr.  Zanuck  that  the 
reduction  from  55mm.  to  35mm.  had  re- 
sulted in  improved  color,  definition,  and  total 
loss  of  grain,  even  on  the  huge  Roxy  screen. 

Shortly  after  the  Roxy  demonstration, 
Charles  Einfeld,  vice-president  in  charge  of 
advertising,  publicity  and  exploitation,  re- 
vealed that  promotional  campaign  on  “Car- 
ousel” will  be  the  company’s  biggest  since 
“The  Robe,”  and  will  be  budgeted  at  Sl,- 
200,000.  With  holdover  week  advertising, 
he  said,  this  could  go  to  $2,000,000. 

Meanwhile,  in  the  course  of  this  week, 
similar  CinemaScope  55  demonstrations 
were  held  in  Chicago.  Los  Angeles.  Boston, 
San  Francisco  and  Indianapolis. 


A GUEST — and  friend  for  CinemaScope.  A. 
Montague,  Columbia's  general  sales  manager, 
left,  above,  is  taken  in  hand  by  W.  C.  Michel, 
20th-Fox  vice-president. 


THIS  CURIOUS  VISITOR  to  the  20th-Fox  demonstration  in  New  York  last  week  of  its 
new  55mm  CinemaScope  was  greeted  naturally  by  a phalanx  of  executives.  Jack  L. 
Warner,  second  from  left,  who  heads  his  company's  production  efforts,  is  seen  with 
friends  Spyros  Skouras  I20th-Fox  president!,  William  Gehring  {assistant  general  sales 
manager! . Al  Lichtman  I distribution  director!,  and  Charles  Einfeld  (advertising  vice- 
president! . 


12 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  28,  1956 


IT’S  HAI\DS  ACROSS-TOA 
ALLIED  SEE  EYE  TO  EYE 


. . . Organizations  join  forces 
on  two  important  proposals, 
with  joint  platform  citing  unity 
on  arbitration,  divorced  circuits 

For  some  time  now  it’s  been  an  off-again- 
on-again  romance  between  Theatre  Owners 
of  America  and  Allied  States  Association, 
tor  so  long,  in  fact,  that  their  most  recent 
parting  of  the  ways  last  Summer  elicited 
more  concern  than  surprise.  It  seemed  to  be 
just  one  of  those  things  resulting  from  dif- 
ferences in  background,  interests,  etc.  etc. 
Even  their  best  friends  said  so — privately, 
of  course. 

Wednesday  this  week  came  the 
bombshell  and,  as  is  usual  under 
such  circumstances,  the  best  friends 
were  almost  the  last  to  know.  The 
bombshell  was  reconcilation,  the  ex- 
tent of  which  can  be  realized  by  the 
fact  that  the  announcing  press  re- 
lease highlighted  the  very  two  issues 
which  in  the  past  have  caused  all  the 
trouble:  arbitration  and  the  activi- 
ties of  the  divorced  circuits.  Hereto- 
fore, in  their  most  friendly  periods, 
the  two  organizations  have — in  the 
interests  of  friendship — more  or  less 
pretended  these  things  did  not  exist. 

The  reconciliation  was  announced  in  a 
three-page  statement  on  the  TO  A letterhead 
for  release  Wednesday  which,  one  observer 
pointed  out,  was  barely  two  weeks  before 
the  Senate  Small  Business  Subcommittee 
liearings  are  scheduled  to  start. 

It  reported  for  the  first  time  a meeting 
(which  obviously  must  be  regarded  as  hav- 
ing been  secret)  in  Washington  January  18. 
In  attendance  were  a TOA  team  led  by  pres- 
ident Myron  Blank  and  comprising  Walter 
Reade,  Jr.,  and  general  counsel  Herman 
Levy ; and  an  Allied  team  led  by  president 
Rube  Shor  and  comprising  vice-president 
Horace  Adams  and  general  counsel  Abram 
F.  Myers,  who  also  is  Allied  board  chairman. 

Joint  Platform 

The  six  men  adopted  a joint  platform, 
agreeing  most  importantly  on  two  points : 
■'That  TOA  will  represent  to  the  Depart- 
ment of  justice  and  to  the  Senate  Select 
Committee  on  Small  Business  that  it  will 
approve  a plan  of  all-inclusive  arbitration, 
including  arbitration  of  selling  policies  and 
film  rentals;  and  that 

“Allied  will  join  with  TOA  in  urging  to 
the  Department  of  Justice  and  to  the  Senate 
Select  Committee  on  Small  Business  that 
the  theatre  circuits,  including  the  so-called 
divorced  circuits,  be  permitted  to  produce 


and  to  distribute  motion  pictures  with  pre- 
emptive rights  for  their  own  theatres,  which 
they  now  own,  and  legal  replacements  there- 
of, and  not  to  theatres  they  may  thereafter 
acquire.” 

Significantly,  the  platform  has  a third 
point  which  might  otherwise  be  taken  for 
granted : “And  it  is  further  agreed  that  we 
shall  use  our  best  efforts  to  bring  about 
these  results.” 

The  platform  thus  enunciates  in  spare 
style  two  dramatic  reversals  of  policy,  those 
policies  being:  TOA’s  previously  staunch 
and  well-publicized  approval  of  the  newest 
arbitration  plan  that  excludes  film  rentals, 
and  Allied’s  similarly  staunch  and  well-pub- 
licized opposition  to  the  burgeoning  activi- 
ties of  the  divorced  circuits,  to  say  nothing 
of  the  organization’s  particular  disaffection 
for  anything  smacking  of  “pre-emptive” 
rights  to  pictures. 

Boards  Approve 

The  reconciliation  announcement  further 
reports  that  the  platform  has  been  approved 
In'  the  boards  of  directors  of  the  two  organi- 
zations and  that  on  Tuesday  “pursuant  to 
the  platform.”  Mr.  Blank,  Mr.  Shor,  Mr. 
Levy,  Mr.  Myers  and  Trueman  T.  Rem- 
husch.  Allied  exhibitor  leader  from  Indiana, 
met  with  Justice  Department  officials. 

The  release  continued : “TOA  has  notified 
the  distributor  representatives  of  the  (ar- 
bitration) drafting  subcommittee  that  its 
(TOA’s)  board,  the  members  of  whom  were 
polled  by  telephone,  has  voted  temporarily 
to  withdraw  its  approval  of  the  arbitration 
plan  and  to  give  the  plan,  in  view  of  changed 
industry  conditions,  full  consideration  and 
revaluation  at  its  next  meeting,  commencing 
March  4.” 

Disagree  on  Draft 

A distributor,  close  to  the  various  arbi- 
tration proceedings,  Wednesday  reported 
that  when  the  TOA  arbitration  committee 
met  with  the  distributor  negotiators  January 
11,  just  one  week  before  the  momentous 
Washington  meeting,  the  TOA  men  pre- 
sented all  sorts  of  arguments  against  the 
idea  of  presenting  the  then  mutually  agree- 
able arbitration  draft  to  the  Justice  Depart- 
ment in  time  for  the  Senate  hearings. 

The  reconciliation  notice  concludes : “The 
appropriate  officers  of  TOA  have  been 
authorized : 

“1.  To  make  every  possible  effort  to 
broaden  the  scope  of  arbitrability  so  as  to 
make  arbitrable  any  and  all  issues  arising 
out  of  the  customary  film  licensing  contract. 

“2.  To  do  everything  possible  to  bring 
more  product  on  the  market. 

“3.  To  do  everything  possible  to  stem  the 


tide  of  ever-increasing  film  rentals,  even  to 
seeking  the  arbitration  of  film  rentals. 

“4.  Especially  in  view  of  the  acute  seller’s 
market  which  has  developed  since  October, 
1955,  and  because  of  harsh  trade  practices 
that  have  developed  since  that  time,  to  with- 
draw approval,  temporarily,  of  the  proposed 
system  of  arbitration  so  that  the  entire 
matter  may  be  reviewed  and  revaluated  at 
our  board  meeting  starting  on  March  4,  and 
that  the  interim  period  be  used  to  attempt 
to  accomplish  all  of  the  projects  above 
outlined.” 


New  Bill  Would  Relax 
New  York  Sunday  Law 

ALBANY : Sunday  entertainment  and 

sports,  including  motion  pictures,  could  start 
at  1 :05  P.M.  instead  of  the  present  2 P.M. 
under  the  terms  of  a bill  introduced  by  Sena- 
tor William  F.  Condon,  Republican,  of 
Yonkers.  The  measure,  which  would  amend 
the  penal  law  and  take  effect  immediately, 
has  been  referred  to  the  Codes  Committee. 
As  described,  the  bill  relates  to  baseball  and 
football.  It  would  affect  entertainment,  too, 
in  any  locality  where  local  ordinances  did 
not  conflict. 

Cinemiracle  to  Use  RCA 
Sound  Recording  System 

RCA  stereophonic  film  recording  equip- 
ment, including  the  industry’s  first  transis- 
torized seven-track  mixer  amplifier,  has  been 
leased  by  Cinemiracle  Corporation  for  use 
with  its  new  wide  screen  motion  picture 
process,  it  was  announced  this  week  by  El- 
mer Rhoden,  president  of  Cinemiracle,  and 
H.  D.  Bradbury,  of  RCA.  He  said  RCA 
expects  to  begin  delivery  of  the  amplifier 
and  associated  location  recording  equipment 
early  this  year.  Mr.  Rhoden  said  Cine- 
miracle also  expects  to  introduce  its  new 
film  process  early  this  year. 

Goldwyn  Gives  $75,000 
For  New  PCC  Building 

HOLLYWOOD : Samuel  Goldwyn  has 

given  the  Permanent  Charities  Committee 
$75,000  with  which  to  establish  its  own 
permanent  building  at  La  Cienega  Boule- 
vard and  Rosewood  Avenue,  it  is  announced 
by  Y.  Frank  Freeman,  chairman  of  the 
committee.  The  organization  was  founded 
in  1940  at  Mr.  Goldwyn’s  suggestion.  Mr. 
Freeman  also  said  that  Mr.  Goldwyn  already 
has  subscribed  $30,(KX)  to  PCC’s  current 
campaign  and  that  his  contributions  since 
1940  exceed  $350,000. 


MOTION  PICTURE  HERALD,  JANUARY  28.  1956 


13 


MONDAY 

THRU 

FRIDAY 

9:30-9:55  P.  M. 


Exclusive!  An  Important  First  in  Motion  Picture 

20lh  HIRES  CBS-RADIO’S  O 
PROGRAMS  TO  SELL  ROD 


BING  CROSBY 
SHOW 


• • f • ^ 


EDGAR  BERGEN - 
CHARLIE  McCarthy 
SHOW 


CONTINUOUS  EXPOSURE 
ON  THESE  8 SHOWS 

I Begins  February  8th 

J Blankets  202 -Station  Network 

I Totals  116,085,000  Impressions 

20th  puts  the  top  names  in  radio  to  work  for 
you  to  attain  total  saturation  for  “Carousel" 
in  CineniaScope  55  at  the  in-home  level. 


AMOS  ‘N’  ANDY  ■ JACK  CARSON 

SHOW  ■ SHOW 


PETER  POTTER’S 
JUKE  BOX 
JURY 


MONDAY 

THRU 

FRIDAY 

9:05-9:30  P.  M. 


I 


I 

i 

I 


“I  am  so  very  proud  to  he  a member  of  the  organization  that  is 

forward,  to  an  ever  brighter  future  for  us  all.” 


1 


Exploitation  ! 


« # 


MONDAY 

THRU 

FRIDAY 

7:05-7:30  P.  M. 


ICTURE  IN  THE  NEW 


DE  LUXE 


Look  to  20th  for 
imaginative,  pioneer- 
ing merchandising 
plans  which  hack  up 
great  motion  pictures 


LLITV 

IN’S 


— Spyros  P.  Skouras,  President 
20th  Century-Fox  Film  Corporation 


GERS  and  HAMMERST 


THE  FIRST  MOTION 


y-  a 


yr 


COLOR  by 


This  in  addition  to  the  full- 
scale  magazine^  newspaper, 
TV  and  billboard  cam- 
paigns. You’ll  know  what 
mass  penetration  really 
means  when  you  check  the 
pre-sold  figures  20th  is 
building  on  this  great  at- 
traction-over one  billion 
impressions! 


CURT  MASSEY 
SHOW 


GALEN  DRAKE 
SHOW 


MITCH  MILLER 
SHOW 


always  planning  ahead  and  moving 


De  Mille  Asks  Vigilance  to  Fight 
Corrupting  Forces  in  Industry 


HOLLYWOOD:  Those  who  make  films 

must  never  forget  they  are  "responsible  as 
artists  and  as  molders  of  men's  thoughts," 
Cecil  B.  De  Mille  said  this  week  when  he 
was  honored  at  a banquet  given  by  the 
Screen  Producers  Guild  at  the  Beverly 
Hilton  here.  He  received  the  guild's 
annual  Milestone  Award  in  recognition  of 
his  contributions  to  the  development  of 
the  screen. 

Mr.  De  Mille  asked  for  vigilance  against 
forces  that  threaten  to  "corrupt"  the  in- 
dustry from  within  and  "to  cramp  and 
stifle  it"  from  without.  "Our  greatest  dan- 
ger from  within  the  industry,"  he  said,  "is 
the  worship  of  the  golden  calf — the  temp- 
tation to  care  nothing  about  what  we  put 
on  the  screen  as  long  as  it  makes  money." 

To  appeal  to  the  lowest  instincts  of  the 
public  for  the  sake  of  the  box  office  is 
"treason  to  the  human  spirit  and  treason 
to  the  art  we  serve,"  Mr.  De  Mille  sa  id.  He 
added,  however,  that  film  makers  must 
also  resist  pressures  that  would  have  them 
"distort  the  truth  by  showing  a picture  of 
the  world  which  is  false  because  it  leaves 
out  the  fact  that  life  has  a seamy  side." 

Some  well-meaning  people  want  art  to 
be  so  antiseptic,  he  continued,  they  would 
"repeal  the  very  definition  of  art  as  a 
mirror  held  up  to  nature"  if  there  were  no 


CECIL  B.  DEMILLE 


resistance.  "These  good  people,"  he  said, 
"sought  very  hard  to  get  their  way,  some- 
times by  censorship,  sometimes  by  organ- 
ized and  disciplined  pressure  groups.  I 
stress  the  fact  that  these  people  are  good 
and  well-meaning,  but  they  know  not  what 
they  do. 

"Neither  motion  pictures  nor  any  other 
art  has  the  right  to  corrupt  morals,  but  it 
has  the  right  to  be  judged  as  an  art  and 
by  judges  who  know  what  they  are  talking 
about." 


New  England  Variety  Club 
Names  Smith  Chief  Barker 

BOSTON : Pliilip  Smith,  president  of  Smith 
Management  Company,  has  been  elected 
chief  barker  of  the  Variety  Club  of  New 
England.  Others  elected  were  Michael  Red- 
'tone.  president  of  Redstone  Drive-in  Thea- 
tres, and  Kenneth  Douglass,  president  of 
Capitol  Theatre  Supply  Company,  vice-presi- 
dents ; William  S.  Koster,  executive  di- 
rector: James  Marshall,  treasurer,  and 

George  Roberts,  secretary.  Directors  are : 
Richard  Berenson,  Reuben  Landau,  Arthur 

H.  Lockwood,  James  Mahoney,  Benn  Rosen- 
wald.  James  Stoneman  and  Arnold  Van 

I. eer. 

Oklahoma  Theatre  Owners 
Appoint  Committees 

OKLAHOMA  CITY:  At  a recent  special 
meeting  of  United  Theatre  Owners  of  Okla- 
homa, Inc.,  Ed  Thorne,  president  of  the  as- 
sociation. appointed  the  following  commit- 
tees : Red  Slocum,  convention  chairman ; 
Glenn  Thompson,  Olie  Brownlee  and  H.  D. 
Cox,  greeting  committee;  Bob  Busch  and 


.\thel  Boyter,  trade  show  committee ; Ed 
Thorne,  B.  J.  McKenna,  and  Norman  and 
Earl  Sniiler,  special  convention  committee ; 
Gordon  Leonard,  Paul  Stonum,  Anadarko 
and  Max  Geinsibler,  and  Hollis  Herrod,  spe- 
cial events  committee,  and  Richard  Thomp- 
son and  Fern  Rice,  city  registration  com- 
mittee, The  general  convention  committee 
includes  Ray  Hughes,  Red  Slocum,  Paul 
Stonum,  C.  F,  Motley,  Harold  Combs, 
Richard  Thompson,  Earl  Snider  and  Avce 
Waldron..  The  transportation  committee  in- 
cludes George  Grube  and  Skeve  Geer 
Dillender. 

Booking-Buying  Unit  Meets 
At  Cleveland  in  February 

Sidney  L.  Cohen,  president  of  the  recently 
organized  National  Association  of  Film 
.Service  Organizations,  announces  that  a full 
membership  meeting  of  the  buying-booking 
unit  will  meet  at  the  Hotel  Cleveland,  Cleve- 
land, February  18-19.  Following  a policy  of 
frequent  meetings,  the  members  will  get  to- 
gether during  1956  in  Atlanta,  Dallas,  St. 
Louis  and  Denver,  Mr.  Cohen  added.  An 
organizational  committee  is  now  preparing 
an  application  for  incorporation. 


Directors  Guild  Studies 
Cooperation  on  Code 

HOLLYWOOD:  In  sequel  to  the  sug- 
gestion of  John  Farrow  that  the  talent  guilds 
set  up  a means  of  aiding  the  Production 
Code  Administration  with  their  own  system 
of  ethics  and  discipline,  George  Sidney, 
president  of  the  Screen  Directors  Guild,  has 
been  ordered  by  the  guild  board  to  contact 
Y.  Frank  Freeman,  chairman  of  the  board 
of  the  Association  of  Motion  Picture  Pro- 
ducers, on  arranging  a meeting.  There, 
producers,  directors.,  writers  and  actors  guild 
officers  will  examine  the  Code  and  discuss 
ways  in  which  talent  can  share  in  the  re- 
sponsibility for  its  observance.  Mr.  Sidney 
said  in  part,  “There  definitely  must  be  a 
Code  and  it  should  be  administered  by  joint 
effort  and  in  the  interest  of  the  entire  in- 
dustry." 


Richard  Walsh  Dinner 
Set  for  January  31 

HOLLYWOOD : Richard  F.  Walsh,  inter- 
national president  of  the  lATSE,  who  was 
recently  elected  vice-president  of  the  AFL- 
CIO,  will  be  honored  January  31  at  a testi- 
monial banquet  at  the  Beverly  Hilton  Hotel 
here.  Some  1,000  members  of  the  film  and 
television  industries  are  expected  to  attend 
the  dinner. 


Blumenfeld  Heads  North 
California  Exhibitors 

SAN  FRANCISCO:  Abe  Blumenfeld  of 
Blumenfeld  Theatres  has  been  elected  presi- 
dent of  the  Northern  California  Theatre  As- 
sociation, the  group  has  announced.  Other 
officers  named  were:  Homer  Tegtmeier.  first 
vice-president;  I